Devcon 10110 vs 10270?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by TheRoaminRaider, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. TheRoaminRaider

    TheRoaminRaider Well-Known Member

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    Aug 1, 2010
    I'm pretty sure I know the answer to this, but better safe than sorry.

    I was about to order some 10110 steel putty when I saw the 10270 stainless steel putty, and then I got to thinking. I guess I have always thought that the difference between the devcon steel and the devcon stainless was really just cosmetics (color matching), something that really wouldn't apply to bedding a rifle. But when I saw that the price of the 10270 was nearly double the 10110, and that it was "non-rusting" and certified for food production, I thought there maybe something more to this.

    Is there any benefits to using the stainless putty over the regular steel putty when bedding a stainless rifle? How about a blued or otherwise-coated rifle? Any drawbacks to either? Or am I just way overthinking this now, and there is no real difference? (at least was it comes to bedding)
     
  2. Bob J

    Bob J Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    57
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2011
    Have used the 10110 Devcon to bed a number of rifles without a problem... Can't imagine anything that the SS version would add that would be worth the extra cost...
     

  3. Gene

    Gene Well-Known Member

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    1,326
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    Jan 23, 2007
    Me too; always use 10110, and no problem with it. Never heard of 10270, so I googled it, and here is what I found:

    Description: A stainless steel-filled epoxy for rebuilding and repairing stainless steel equipment.
    Intended Use: Repairs cracks, dents, and breaks in stainless steel machinery or castings; rebuilds dairy equipment; repairs stainless
    steel holding tanks
    Product
    features:
    Acceptable for use in meat and poultry plants
    Machinable to metallic finish
    NSF® Approved (Certified to ANSI/NSF61)
    Resistant to chemicals and most acids, bases, solvents, and alkalis

    Sounds like its for use in stainless steel equipment, not gun stocks.