Carry gun for elk

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by ATH, Dec 5, 2005.

  1. ATH

    ATH Well-Known Member

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    The wife is giving me an elk hunt for Christmas. Sounds like a good excuse to buy a new gun. I've done primarily muzzleloading, so please excuse some ignorant questions.
    I've decided on 300 WSM. I've always liked the Rem700 action, and all signs are they're accurate, so that's the combo I want (is there a better action?).
    This is where I get fuzzy. My buddy has a VLS in 308 and it's nice and stable. But I wonder what I should want to lug around the mountains. What's considered a good weight for this purpose? I'm willing to add an extra couple lbs onto this number as I'm in considerably better aerobic shape than average (ie, can run 2+ hours at 5:40/mile) and so not concerned with getting around at altitude. I want something I can enjoy shooting too, not some 5lb short-barreled mtn gun than will knock my shoulder off.
    Any advice on how to set such a gun up would be appreciated. I'm looking at 500yd capability or so.
     
  2. sewwhat89

    sewwhat89 Well-Known Member

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    Do a search for 7 WSM LSR. If you are going to have a gun built that is. If not, check out Remington M700 LSS in 300 WSM. M700 LSS

    Just my opinion.
     

  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    How bout this 'un? Only 16#!

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/mulhernric800/detail?.dir=14c7&.dnm=88be.jpg&.src=ph

    /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    Oh...and as for that "great shape" you're in! Forget it! When you leave the flatlands and go to 9000'....you'll know it! That's where SUPERMAN took his initial training and he had a hard time up there!! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  4. peppy1hunting

    peppy1hunting Well-Known Member

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    I went on one this fall in Utah. Used a Browning A bolt Medalion. Have a Leupold 4x14x40 30mm with Boone and Crocket plex. I worked up a load during summer to match plex and was comfortable out to 600 yds. Took a nice 360 class bull at 450yds -one shot. I don't claim to be an expert but did a nice job for me. Most of it is shot placement and practice in my opinion. Hard to squeeze a tight shot when your puffing for air so physical shape is also important. I live in Utah so used to altitude but definitely a factor if not used to that. Hope you get that 400 class bull!
     
  5. budlight

    budlight Well-Known Member

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  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Don't like them stainless rifles! They'd shine like a "diamond in a Billygoats arse" in bright light!! Them elks would cross the divide iffen they caught that reflection!! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  7. ATH

    ATH Well-Known Member

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    RMulhern, that's a nice gun though 16# is a bit heavy and I think I'd like a scope for this hunt! And trust me, even coming from the flatlands a nationally-competitive runner can climb with a native any day. I've been to altitude before, and while my heartrate goes up a bit exertion is not an issue unless I'm trying to run the elk down.

    I like the looks of the 700 SPS, Budlight. But the site doesn't list the 300 WSM as one of the option...is their listing incomplete? The available calibers for all of the 700s looks a lot sparser than I would expect.

    Thanks everyone.
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    ATH

    Well...undoubtedly...you'd be a step up on me being as how I'm 65 but over the years I've learned to take my time...stop....blow....and go again! I never did like hunting elk with "track shoes" on anyway! Them "buggers" got lungs akin to an elephant and I figured they could outrun me a long time ago but not my bullets! So...I find a good place, sit on my arse, drink coffee, eat Moon Pies, drink more coffee, glass with good Zeiss glasses, and thank the Good Lord for the day I'm having!!

    IMO....a man hasn't lived UNTIL he's sat on top of a mountain and observed the GLORY THAT GOD HATH MADE before his eyes!! I hope I have many more of those moments! My Dad is working on 91 yrs. so maybe I'll get lucky!!

    Hope you enjoy that hunt!

    HOLD HARD & STAY CENTER! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    Oh...from what I've read over the years....if one isn't a native of high altitude country....it takes a full two years or more for a "flat-landers" body to build up enough red corpuscles to be equal with a native what's been born/bred in the High Country!

    FWIW!
     
  9. Dave King

    Dave King Well-Known Member

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    I'm a flatlander too and hunt not too far from Rick Mulherns haunt near Antonio at about 10,000 ASL. This last year I took my 375H&H (basically a custom barreled Sendero) and had no problems with walking and stalking for miles. I'm of the mind that it's not so much the weight of the rifle but the manner in which you carry it and what you're accustomed to carrying. I'd imagine this years' rifle weighed in at about 12lbs (my spare, left in camp, rifle weighs about 15lbs) and I carried a pack for about 20 to 25lbs more without grief. It takes about two days to get acclimated to the camp site, a little more water and no undue hard labor is best.

    Get whatever gun you feel would work well at your flatland site and carry it in the mountains. Better to have a trusted and known rifle than a seldom used stranger.

    P. S. I can run from the couch to the refrigerator or bathroom in about 15 seconds (and then a short rest and I can run back to the couch!) and that's about all the further I've run in several years so you're probably in fine shape.
     
  10. budlight

    budlight Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    I like the looks of the 700 SPS, Budlight. But the site doesn't list the 300 WSM as one of the option...is their listing incomplete? The available calibers for all of the 700s looks a lot sparser than I would expect.

    Thanks everyone.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Really a sparce choice of calibers. the model 7 comes in the 300Rem shor mag. But it only comes with a 22 inch barrel maybe ask them if they would make you a 26.

    Don't worry about brushed stainless - It does not reflect the sun light. I have a couple of them.

    I did a search on 300 WSM Sako makes a nice wood stock stainless. Click on the first box and you can pull up their line of rifles. I've got a gun collector friend that has a set of every caliber that Sako made. It's like a 22 gun set. I keep asking for the 416 Rem from him. couple of years ago he gave me a custom 458 American

    Another choice is what I have done in the past. Just pickup a used 700 and ship it off to a gun smith and really have it made into what you like. I don't even claim to be as healthy as you and I hump the mountians with my 8.5 pound barrel target guns.

    http://www.sako.fi/
     
  11. ATH

    ATH Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like I'm buying used and spending the difference on smith work.

    Actually, it takes about 3 wks at altitude to get your RBC count up to peak levels. Living for prolonged periods of time at altitude causes other increases in fitness that account for the differences you see between natives and "imports". For people exerting themselves regularly, this may include an increased capillary density or heart capacity. Off topic, but interesting for elk hunting! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif
     
  12. LB

    LB Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't want this to be taken as a negative. I see a lot of comments about the "reflective" nature of stainless steel. In my opinion, the movement is what attracts attention, not the flash. Reflection occurs all over the place, a natural condition, and an elk wouldn't necessarily be scared out of his wits, seeing the flash off the end of a ss barrel, or scope lens, or a shooters glasses. There are many shiny things in the woods, like ice, wet rock faces, stuff like that. In my opinion, an animal is likely to pay this as much attention as a gunshot, which is hardly none, sometimes.

    Short answer: brushed or glass beaded s/s barrels, as an attention getter: overrated.

    Good hunting. LB
     
  13. budlight

    budlight Well-Known Member

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    My house is at @5000 feet I used to live at 7200 feet. I'm pretty aclimated after 17 years. I have friends come up from sea level and you start hicking around over 8000 feet and they die out pretty fast.
     
  14. zupatun

    zupatun Well-Known Member

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    Re: Carry gun for elk--altitude

    Got stationed in Denver when I was a butterbar LT. and went out for a run--got a headache after a mile and I was in "good" shape--I could run that 5:40 mile for at least three of them on the flatlands. Nowadays I'm 35lbs heavier, 12 years older and get to hit the slopes at about 4000' higher than denver (sleep at 9000' and snowboard from 12,000 to 8,000 all day). I feel much more acclimated (but damn sore) after two days (even though I know it actually takes longer) or more quickly than I did back then and my miles are in the 8:30 range cause I'm not all sudden like anymore. Go figure.

    I carried my tikka .308 VarmintSS with plastic stock and Lupy 4.5x15x50 scope with bipod all around PA last week up and down the hills about 8-10 miles each day. Started 1/2 hour before sunup and quit half an hour after sunset. I just kept switching hands, but by the end of the day my right hand was a little tired--that's the one that always got tired rock climbing too--no surprise there. Overall with bipod and scope the thing weighs in around 11lbs. A little tired, but I could do it some more and didn't hate the gun. Just my 4 cents.