Bore Snake...any problems with using?

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by bbush, Jun 13, 2011.

  1. bbush

    bbush New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Joined:
    May 8, 2011
    I was wondering if anyone has an opinion on the use of a bore snake and the damaging of a rifle's barrel. I was on another website and came across a post that was saying that bore snake's can cause damage to rifle barrels especially in the throat area. The post also said that the bore snake can "grind powder residue and other contaminants" into the barrel's rifling. It is just hard for my to imagine that a bore snake would be that hard on a barrel, especially when you consider that the hardest thing on one is the bronze pull through handle and barrel scrubbing brissels. To me, it would look like the action of a bullet going down the barrel would "grind " continants into the steel more than the pull through action of a bore snake. I have a new bore snake that I was planning on using while sighting in a new rifle this weekend, but after reading the post on the other website, I am having second thoughts.
     
  2. ICANHITHIMMAN

    ICANHITHIMMAN Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,380
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    I use them on all my ARs and pistols as well as my M1a never had an issue. I dont use them on any of my LR rifles but I would. Sounds a bit crazy to me what site was it?
     

  3. MTBULLET

    MTBULLET Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,056
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2007
    I have one in every gun case i own. Best thing for "in the field" cleaning I've found.
     
  4. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,812
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    I won't use one anymore for regular cleaning! After the brush all the crude that was loosened is now in the tail section so the next trip down you drag all that through your chamber, neck and throat which is the area your trying to protect with bore guides and quality cleaning rods that are themselves CLEAN! Just my opinion, I do carry one in the mountains just in case I need it though like MTBULLET.
     
  5. MTBULLET

    MTBULLET Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,056
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2007
    I agree the "tail" can get dirty, but a good "shaking" can get most of the loose stuff off. And, I clean mine regularly in the dish washer. (dont tell my wife!)
     
  6. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,812
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    :D:D:D
     
  7. LouBoyd

    LouBoyd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    770
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2007
    I don't use bore snakes. The problem is keeping them clean. I live in Arizona whch has lots of blowing sand. Many types of sand have sharp edges and are harder than arrel steel. I keep my cotton patches in small ziplock bags and woldn't consider re-using one. It's not practical or cost effective to use only fresh bore snakes. If an oily used snake is left in a range bag it will pick up lots of fine sand. Would you use 600 grit carborundum cloth. for patches?

    I don't buy the concern over powder residue causing throat damage. It's hot high pressure high velocity propellant that eroads throats. that has very little to do with cleaning techniques.

    If I'm carrying a rifle in the field in conditions with blowing dust I put a finger cot (available at any drugstore) over the muzzle. Shooting sand out of a barrel with a bullet does more damage than pushing it out the bore with a wet or dry cotton patch but that's more damaging than not letting sand in the barrel to start with. The cots are cheap and will also keep out rain or snow. If you forget to remove one it only has a small effect on accuracy.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2011
  8. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

    Messages:
    8,853
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    I pulled one through one of my LR rifles and had the most horrible feeling come over me. I almost swooned.:rolleyes:

    It was raspy as all get out requiring a stout pull. Regarding pulling it straight the vision of the old hand forged barn door hook being blown over the years cutting a deep arc in the barn door.

    One pull through was all it took for me. Almost had to up my meds!:)
     
  9. Tikkamike

    Tikkamike Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,337
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2009
    Just keep the bore snake in a plastic bag then^^

    I use them a lot I actually take the brush out of them and keep them in my pack incase I get something in the barrel when hunting.
     
  10. LouBoyd

    LouBoyd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    770
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2007
    You can, but where did whatever abrasive material that was in the bore before you pulled the snake through go? I never reuse a patch. Putting a bore snake in a bag doesn't clean it. Maybe if you wash a bore snake after each use it wuold be abrasive free but that's more effort than using fresh patches.
     
  11. rscott5028

    rscott5028 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,608
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2010
    They're great as a fallback out in the field.

    But, they aren't a replacement for a proper rod and bore guide.

    -- richard
     
  12. carbinero

    carbinero Member

    Messages:
    18
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2009
    I'll estimate I shoot 100 rounds every other month and clean with the snake afterwards using Weaponshield, Prolix, or other similar CLP. I clean the snake afterwards, dry it, and pop it back in the original plastic packaging. I clean with rod and patches once a year. This is with all of my barrels, none of which is a premium custom. Used to use rod and patches everytime, but then realized it took longer to get them shooting accurately again!

    Just googled this up, from calguns:

    "The military may use CLP to clean their bores but that is for reasons of convenience and logistics. Military snipers do not use CLP to clean bolt guns.
    http://lightfighter.net/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/4706084761/m/661103431?r=650104431#650104431

    That was in reference to teflon which, when used in the CLP, could leave an undesirable residue.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2011
  13. davkrat

    davkrat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    655
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    Used mine pretty religiously for years. For a shotgun I don't see any reason to use anything other than a boresnake. Once I switched over to shooting solid copper ETips I noticed the boresnake was not getting the copper out. I now use the old rod and jags about every 3 or 4 trips just to get the bore back to bare metal.

    The boresnake is great at the range and during break in of a barrel it's so much quicker to swab the barrel out. I also believe that all that surface area helps cool down a barrel. I think they're great for light cleaning and keeping carbon build up down which should make copper removal easier. Add in a good cleaning with standard tools every now and then and you should be fine. If they get dirty just toss them in the washer in a mesh "lingerie" bag.