Best rest when developing a load?

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by RangerBrad, Nov 1, 2011.

  1. RangerBrad

    RangerBrad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    290
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2010
    Hey fellas, Worked on a 25-06 load this weekend using berger bullets and going from 51 gr to 54 gr of H4831 powder one grain at a time. they all shot less than 1 moa with most in the .3 to .6 moa area. that evening I made up 6 loads of 54gr and 6 loads of 51gr to test agin as the 51 gr shot best that morning and I just wanted to see if I could duplicate. However That evening all 4 groups( both 51 and 54 gr) were outside of 1 moa. (1 to 1.2 moa) The only diffrence is that in the morning I was using a swivel type rifle rest and in the evening I used a bipod because it was steadier. All shots were taken at rifle range with no wind and off wooden shooting tables. All I guess is that the recoil of the rifle on the bipod on wooden table is what did it. Is this common and what kind of rest do yal recommend? Thank's, Brad
     
  2. Sully2

    Sully2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,480
    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    I use a bipod with sandbag at the butt....and at other times a front and rear sandbag(s).

    The only important thing is that the rifle be "restrained" i.e."sandbagged" to the point where it cant move at all.
     

  3. RangerBrad

    RangerBrad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    290
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2010
    That evening I had it on a bipod with my coat rolled up under the butt. It was very stable while aming however It would plumb come off the table when fired. Brad
     
  4. dirtball

    dirtball Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    764
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    When ever I shoot a bi-pod off of a solid (wood, concrete, or a rock) surface I ALWAYS put something like a piece of carpet or a shirt between the bi-pod and the hard surface, it seems to dampen that initial bounce as the gun is being fired.

    Dave
     
  5. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,313
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    It may not be the best method for testing, but I use the Lead sled from Caldwell because it is
    consistant shot to shot and rifle to rifle.

    After the test are complete Then I verify the zero and group size with what ever type of rest I
    will be using in the field. (Bipod,shooting bag,off hand Etc.)

    Also by using the same system I can compare loads at a later date or a different batch of the
    same powder.

    For consistant results use consistant methods.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  6. Tikkamike

    Tikkamike Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,362
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2009
    not all rifles respond well to a bipod. sometimes if not floated enough. it will cause the barrel to touch the stock when it whips and that will cause inconsistency from shot to shot. You need to find a solid, comfortable and repeatable rest when doing load developent. I fint that a good bag under the recoil lug and a rear bag make for a great combination. once you have a good load that you have proven try shooting your rifle from a bipod and see how it shoots, it may or may not work out for you.
     
  7. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,210
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2011
    The human needs to be part of the equation so I always shoot from a field expedient rest or bipod when evaluating ammo/loads.

    It really doesn't matter if you can shoot .020MOA at one thousand with it strapped to some type of sled if you can't hit the target with it under actual field conditions.
     
  8. Tikkamike

    Tikkamike Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,362
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2009
    You need to find out if that load will actually shoot first. You might be throwing out a perfectly good load because it doesn't shoot from a bipod and you do t know it.once you know the rifle is capable Then try it from a bipod or whatever position you wish.first things first though and limit the variables as uch as possible and stay consistent
     
  9. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,210
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2011
    I disagree. It's irrelevant how well it shoots strapped to a sled if you can't hit the target with it under actual field conditions.
     
  10. RangerBrad

    RangerBrad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    290
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2010
    I understand and agree that I need to shoot it under field conditions however, this exercise that i'm doing now is for load development purposes only, just trying to get tighest groups with highest velocity. Thank's for the info fellas, Brad
     
  11. Tikkamike

    Tikkamike Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,362
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2009
    I dont shoot using a sled, however the point I am trying to make is if you are working up a load for a rifle you dont know if that rifle shoots well off of a bipod or not. Because some rifles will shoot great until you put them on a bipod, they just do not react well to all that weight being out on the end of the forearm, This isnt as much of a concern if your barrel is fully floated but if its not then it will change everything usually. So you need to find a load that you know the rifle is capable of shooting accuratley and consistently then once ythe rifle has proven itself go to the range and put it to the test with a bipod or sticks or whatever you like to shoot from.
    Otherwise when your load doesnt shoot right you have no idea why, but you blame it on the load... in reality it could be your barrel bouncing off the forend of your stock....so NO it is not irrelevant
     
  12. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,637
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2007
    I do all load work up and testing from a field position. On a bipod scratched solidly into the dirt and a good solid bag under the rear. But also I don't waste much ammo at 100 yards. Take your loads to 200 or 300 to fine tune to 1/2 moa then take them on out.

    Jeff
     
  13. Tikkamike

    Tikkamike Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,362
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2009
    so everyones just going to pretend all rifles should shoot well from a bipod?
    BTW "Field Position" does not mean bipod for everyone, I shoot from a pack when hunting most of the time.
     
  14. Dean2506

    Dean2506 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    104
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2011
    when working up a load i like to take myself out of the equation as much as possible. Once i find the loads i like then i practice with those loads in field conditions. If I know the capabilities of the gun load combo then I know any error is my fault.