6.5 grendel for elk?

Discussion in 'Elk Hunting' started by mongoose, Apr 20, 2008.

  1. mongoose

    mongoose Well-Known Member

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    what do folks think about using the 6.5 grendel for hunting at less than 300 yards?

    I know the range is subjective; just getting an idea if the round have enough "oomph".
     
  2. britz

    britz Well-Known Member

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    Not an expert on elk, but I know they are hard to kill. IMO, if you are going to spend the cash on an elk trip, just add in another 600 for a bigger rifle. You are stretching the Grendel to the limits with Elk IMO.
     

  3. mongoose

    mongoose Well-Known Member

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    Thats about where I'm at...elk don't normally just drop and if they do chances are the trauma will ruin a good portion of the meat...in my xp.
     
  4. Tracer

    Tracer Well-Known Member

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    Mongoose I personally believe that the 6.5 is a bit light up front for taking on mature bull elk! I also think, that a distance of 200 yards would present a more satisfactory result, as elk don't just fall over dead when struck by your bullet.

    Now over the last several decades, I have hunted elk in several states and used several calibers. Those being a 25-06, 270 Winchester (simply to light really), 7mm Rem mag, 300 Win mag, 338/06, 338 Win mag and even the .375H&H. I preferr to hunt those bull elk with a .338 Win mag and 225 grain bullet or my backup rifle, that being a .338/06 with 210 grain bullet. Those mature bull elk are very tough animals to put down and I have never put one down on the first shot and had it drop in it's tracks, never.
     
  5. JPRITT

    JPRITT Well-Known Member

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    I have pondered and pondered on the Grendel. I personally like the caliber but IMO it only really fits the purpose it was designed for. Shooting people. I've looked at it for a windy day varmit gun. Short range deer gun. Back up target gun. etc. etc. And when it comes down to it, there are just too many superior cartridges out there to "settle" on the 6.5 Grendel. If you are purposely hunting elk with a AR platform rifle. The 338 Federal would be a better choice. Or a 260 rem. 7/mm08 , 308, or bigger. prefferably bigger. I would just hate to have that sinking feeling of knowing I just shot an animal and I didnt see it go down do to a poor Caliber choice. IMO there are just too many suitable calibers to consider this one.
     
  6. Tracer

    Tracer Well-Known Member

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    Now over the years, when younger hunters asked me about hunting big game mainly elk, I tell them that the 30-06 caliber with 180 grain bullet would be my minimum choice. I have personally seen and range the distance of a bull killed in Wyoming at 445 yards. The choice of the bullet by the hunter was a 180 grain Nosler partition.

    So those of you who might have the magnum itch, remember the Old Soldier is no slouch when it comes to shooting far down range and getting the job done. These days my favorite highcountry rifle is a model 70 Winchester (old 30-06) that was wildcated into a .338/06 and the rifle with scope weighs under 7 pounds. Shooting 210 grain bullets, it is a bonified 350 yard elk killer.
     
  7. travisch

    travisch Member

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    I've killed 4 elk with a 6.5 BRM built by Eben Brown of Eabco from 40 to 300 yards. Its all about bullet type and shot placement.
    This round is basically a 30-30 thats been necked down to 6.5 with the shoulder moved up. I use 38 grains of VV160 that pushes a 140 grain berger VLD at 2500 fps. I think this is slightly less then the Grendel. My point is that the 6.5 is fine but take a look at bullet performance. A 400 yrd shoulder shot on an elk with this round would be questionable but if its a shoulder hit you didn't do your part. Some people will flame me for using a berger which is considered a match bullet which is fine as we're all entitled to our opinions. I've killed a lot of animals with match grade bullets and I prefer the multiple wound channels when the bullet fragments.
     
  8. bwaites

    bwaites Well-Known Member

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    This question has been debated many times, and in a particularly long thread on Grendel forums.

    The Grendel is capable of taking elk, and it has done so, but shooting a big bull elk, especially a trophy type bull, at 400 yards is more than questionable. Can you kill the elk with the Grendel, yes! Is it a great caliber to do so, not in my opinion, and I just returned from a clinic where I was regularly dinging an 8" gong in 25 mph winds and snow with mine.

    Great shot placement, it will do the job, but then, so will a .22!

    Bill
     
  9. elkaholic

    elkaholic Well-Known Member

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    If you limit your shots to 300 yds. I wouldn't hesitate to use it on elk providing you are using the right bullet. I have killed in excess of 25 bulls with a 6.5-06 A.I. most of which were 300-600 yds. and had none get away. Shot placement should be the same whether you are using your 6.5 or a 300 ultra. (in the heart/lung zone).....Rich
     
  10. travisch

    travisch Member

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    Here is a 5x5 bull my son shot last year with a 6.5 BRM which is almost identical to the Grendel. 256 yards with 140 grain Berger at 2550 fps.
    [​IMG]
     
  11. winmag

    winmag Well-Known Member

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    Well IMO youd bennifit from a larger caliber, but if thats what you have and you already stated that you have a self imposed range limmit of 300yds, I see absolutely no reason why it wouldnt work with a tough bullet. Heck Ive whitnessed a bunch of elk killed with a 264win mag. Ive seen em killed with a lot smaller than that too. Not my first choice of caliber, but ya it'll work. Just choose your shot wisley and dont be affraid of follow up shots if needed.
    An elk will run off with a well placed shot from a 338 just as fast as with a .264, if he decides he wants to. Elk are funny critters. They have a knack for deciding when and where to die. (and usually its a long way away from anywhere in a deep dark nasty hole:D). As long as its a legal caliber, and you know your rifle and its capabilities, and limmits, and you find a happy medium between the two. Take care in shot placement, and youll be fine. Best of luck to you.

    Hey Travisch, If you edit your pic to about 1/4 that size we could see all of it w/o having to scroll way to the right.
    Id realy like to see the whole thing. Just a thought. Thanks for the pic tho.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2010
  12. Don Ward

    Don Ward Well-Known Member

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    We hosted an elk hunt with a writer using the 6.5 Creedmoor with our stock and scope, & 129gr SST. The hunting was slow and the only opportunity was at just over 600 yards. A calm broadside bull, good light, almost no wind, and a good shooting position resulted in a perfect hit. The 129gr passed through and the bull ran about 30 yards and piled up.

    With that placement, about any legal cartridge would probably have the same results. The medium size 6.5s aren't an ideal elk round for capitalizing on every opportunity, but used within their limits are certainly capable. We've taken a lot of elk with a 264 w/140gr at ranges where the speed is similar to the medium size 6.5s at closer range and it has proven very effective. That said, the 7mm with a 180 is our go-to elk set-up.
     
  13. Tyler Kemp

    Tyler Kemp SPONSOR

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    Now that is a huge picture! Very nice work by your son!

    At the reduced velocities, using a tough bullet may actually work against you, if it is meant for higher velocity cartridges.
     
  14. River Runner

    River Runner Member

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    I'd sure hate to see a trophy bull standing broadside at 500 yards when I've got a 300 yard rifle in my hands. I've usually found that the guns and ammo are the cheapest part of hunting.

    Sounds like an excellent excuse for a new rifle???