4.00" OAL extended magazine. DIY?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by angus-5024, Mar 26, 2013.

  1. angus-5024

    angus-5024 Well-Known Member

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    I have a .338 RUM that I would like to put an longer mag in, but dont feel like paying $200 for a gun smith to install it, when the guys in these parts will probably just use a dremel anyways.

    So my question is, has anybody done this themselves? I know that I would also have to machine the bolt stop down. Can I do it with a dremel (im pretty good with power tools.)?
     
  2. Daveinjax

    Daveinjax Well-Known Member

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    You could do it yourself but my smith only charged me $50 to mill out the back for my wyatt magazine box and I filed the bolt stop myself. Looks a whole lot neater than if I had tried to freehand it . If you try it yourself be very careful not to heat it and loose the temper around where you grind. I was happy to pay to have it professionally milled.
     

  3. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Sorry . A dremil ? No self respecting smith would use one.

    I have had to clean up after someone used one many times and it cost much more to fix a
    mess than to do it right the first time.

    I know it looks easy and it is with the right tools. But It is very easy to screw things up with a dremil
    beyond repair and if you ever try to sell it you will almost have to give it away if they spot the work
    done with one.

    Just a suggestion.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  4. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    You can do it with Dremel Tool. It'll look like chit, the box many not fit well, and the value of the rifle/receiver will be lower than before you did it. Have you considered a chisel and a 3# hammer? A Dremel Tool a 'power' tool? More like a "trouble maker"!
     
  5. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    You could save a bunch of grinding if you bulked out most of it with an Air Arc or Plasma cutter. Not!

    Use a mill. You could probably get it done for free at your local community college or even high school as long as they have a decent metal shop program.
     
  6. angus-5024

    angus-5024 Well-Known Member

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    all right all right, I kinda figured as much. The smith in town here is, well... nice but lacking in proffesionalism. The nearest smith is 2.5 hours away. I guess its worth it. Ohh the lengths we go to make our guns a better system.

    Thanks guys!
     
  7. angus-5024

    angus-5024 Well-Known Member

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    " You could probably get it done for free at your local community college or even high school as long as they have a decent metal shop program. "

    I like this idea. Im always one to give kids a chance to try something, with pay.
     
  8. Daveinjax

    Daveinjax Well-Known Member

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    Milling the action to fit the box is not precision work and a local automotive machine shop could do it for you if you have the instructions and explain it. Might get lucky and the machinist be a gun guy.
     
  9. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    Just try walking into any school today, with a disassembled firearm! Even the schools with gunsmithing programs keep pretty close controls on what is coming in.
     
  10. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    It's done all the time. A stripped receiver or a barrel blank is not a firearm. Raw bolt rifle parts don't even look like a gun. A high school student probably couldn't bring it in but when the metal shop teacher is approached by an adult with a little one off project they will usually bend over backwards to help a guy out. Common sense says leave it in the car until you get approval from the teacher.

    When my son was taking the machine shop program at both the high school and then later college he did gun part projects all the time. He was fitting barrels and muzzle brakes at the college. We still have the working cannons he built in 2009.

    The college machine shop teacher also frequents our shop and Brady still volunteers on their shop night. He says other guys are bringing in gun parts all the time.

    Right now the class project is billet AR lowers on the schools CNC.
     
  11. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Thats great but Be careful !!!!! that is manufacturing and we all know what the current administration thinks about
    that. if he is building lowers he also needs a manufactures license to stay out of trouble.

    Just a warning.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  12. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    It's only a couple (3 or 4) of advanced students in the project. They are not for resale. You can legally build your own gun.

    That would be an excellent idea for a college machine shop school to do to help finance the program. The school would just have to set up a corporation of some kind and it would have the license. A thousand matched set of billet upper and lower would get the whole program funded pretty nicely. And what a great foundation for the students to be able to spring board themselves into firearm manufacturing or to work for a manufacturer. American manufacturing is the back bone of this country.

    We had a construction program when I was in high school and we built and sold new homes. The homes were cutting edge with solar and advanced features coming from the schools electricity program. That program was completely self sufficiant and the school made tons of money off that. A good percentage of those students ended up in the trade.
     
  13. Frank7mm

    Frank7mm Well-Known Member

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    I would not suggest taking it to a high school even just the action. Most schools have a strict no firearm policy even in the machine shop.
     
  14. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    Our middle school requires every student to take a rifle markmanship class. They use some really high end olympic target air rifles and shoot them indoors at school.

    A receiver without a bolt is just a piece of tube. You still need permission to actually bring it in.