Wolves Dying!?!

Discussion in 'Wolf Hunting' started by geo4061, Nov 7, 2016.

  1. geo4061

    geo4061 Well-Known Member

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    I was watching a National Geographic Special on Yellowstone. They said half the wolf packs had died. The cause was a mite. This mite burrows under their their skin and causes their fur to fall out. Much like the Mange. They soon die. They showed pictures and a lot of them looked terrible. Maybe prayers have been answered. Have you seen this? Have you noticed any increase in deer or elk herds?
     
  2. RockyMtnMT

    RockyMtnMT Official LRH Sponsor

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    We can hope. I will be down in SW MT next week elk hunting. We have seen quite a few wolves the last couple of years there. I would like to shoot another this year but it won't bother me if we see none.

    Steve
     

  3. Mike 338

    Mike 338 Well-Known Member

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    Disease is "the" factor in canine population reduction. To many dogs... disease takes over and populations crash. disease and poison are the only real controls that have ever worked.
     
  4. NEMTHunter

    NEMTHunter Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like nature is taking it coarse again. Thats the same thing that happens to the PD on the CMR. They will not let you shoot the PD's. Then after a bit they are gone from a disease they get. Happens when there to many in one spot.
     
  5. Frank in the Laurels

    Frank in the Laurels Well-Known Member

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    I don't think local residents will be shedding any tears or showing much concern !!
     
  6. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

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    Nailed it.
     
  7. wyowinchester

    wyowinchester Well-Known Member

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    Don't bet on it yet.
    They've lied before about these wolves in the past. I would not put it past them to create their own little world to try to keep them listed.
    Nal't Geo just takes thousands of pictures and makes up a story for their own cause.
     
  8. kyron

    kyron Well-Known Member

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    They were brought to the brink of extinction by bullets and traps, not disease. The trouble is to few people realize there were good reasons for that.
     
  9. Scratch

    Scratch Well-Known Member

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    Could not happen to a nicer species :D

    I do know 18 wolves died this September here in WY from lead poison and the aid of a aircraft gun)
     
  10. Mike 338

    Mike 338 Well-Known Member

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    Actually it was neither shooting or trapping although trapping was done for specific depredation issues and shooting was more a matter of opportunity. Disease is natures way of crashing a population however disease seldom wipes a species out in an area and once crashed, it begins it's cycle of equilibrium again. What got wolves out of the lower 48 was the U.S. Dept of Ag using poison baits and M44's. No doubt private ranchers claimed their share using poison as well. Even with radio collar tracking (which wasn't even thought of back in the day) of a pack, your not going to wipe out a the pack by shooting or trapping although it will give you a sense of control and makes for excellent conversation around the fire.
     
  11. mtmuley

    mtmuley Well-Known Member

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    Jesus Mike 338, you can't post educated, factual information about wolves here. mtmuley
     
  12. D.Camilleri

    D.Camilleri Well-Known Member

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    The wolf mite started when a lone wolf consumed a diseased Hillary supporter visiting YNP. All things are subject to evolution.
     
  13. geo4061

    geo4061 Well-Known Member

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    The wolf is a very social animal. The mite is spread trough contact. They greet each other by rubbing up next to each other. They said half the packs had died and it was still spreading. They showed several wolves that were infected. This is a nasty, terrible, slow suffering way to die. Mother nature will take take of over population problems thru disease or starvation. PETA and anyone that thinks hunting is not necessary for population control should be forced to watch films like this.
     
  14. Mike 338

    Mike 338 Well-Known Member

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    I probably shouldn't mention how canines are able to spontaneously increase their litter size/count when environmental factors are favorable and canine density is low. Basically, when there's plenty of groceries around, if you shoot one, you get two pups in it's place. A void causes a pack to split, introducing another breeding pair in the area. Coyotes do it better than the others. It's pretty much like pruning a willow. They just come back better. Should you shoot one to fill your tag? Absolutely. Just pointing out that maximum effort and an itchy trigger finger doesn't trump a good durse of pestilence.