Why certain actions?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by foreign, Jun 14, 2013.

  1. foreign

    foreign Well-Known Member

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    So have been thinking about this and can't come up with a set reason apart from custom parts. My question is what makes a certain action the main one that people customize? 700's for example. Is it just the aftermarket parts. What makes a 700 any better than a savage, axis, mossberg, ruger, Winchester, ect? If I have a lathe and can blue print them all and thread my own barrel and chamber ect why not start with something like an axis for accustom rifle and save a few $100?
    Thanks for the thought gentalmen.
     
  2. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    After market support for upgrade options, i.e. stocks, trigger, mags, etc ...
     

  3. Joel Russo

    Joel Russo Official LRH Sponsor

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    It's like modding a small block or big block Chevrolet.
     
  4. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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  5. foreign

    foreign Well-Known Member

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    That seems to make sence. I have a fee spare savage barrels and was thinking of getting some axis actions to put them on.

    JE. Do you know of any book with reference to what different actions "like"? I don't smith commercially (want to) so I don't have the experience or means to experiment personally. I know savage likes the tang floating and Remington fully bedded. Any other info out there?
     
  6. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Each action responds differently to changes and each smith has his opinion as to what to do
    in order to make them shoot. That is the reason that some smiths specialize in a certain action.

    In general I find the 700 Remington to be the least finicky and it responds to any or all accurizing

    I do a lot of Weatherby Mark 5s and they do well with the same basic accurizing but normally
    require a different Bedding requirement. The Winchesters and Mauser are about the same.

    As you stated the Savage require different bedding, head spacing and truing to bring them into
    there own (They can be made to shoot very well).

    The only action I have trouble with is the M77 Ruger. Every now and then I have trouble figuring
    out how to get them under 1/2 MOA. Some Smiths Have figured them out and do well. The angled
    recoil lug is the main problem and applies some tricky dynamics's to the action.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  7. villarreal

    villarreal Member

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    I think people first discovered Remington faster Lock-time, then the aftermarket parts are the product of it.

    G.
     
  8. foreign

    foreign Well-Known Member

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    JE cooktop give me a brief run down on want the savage actions need since I have a few of them. And there's lots o info on remingtons. Thanks
     
  9. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    I will tell you what works for Me. Others may have other ideas on how to make the Savages
    shoot.

    First I go through the action and dimension everything to see if all the basic parts are Ok.

    Bolt to action fit is where I find most of the problems (I have found .005 to .007 thousandths
    difference in the bolt diameter from one end to another).

    After Blue printing the complete action the next thing that I do is to do away with the barrel nut
    and buy an after recoil lug There are Two sizes so be sure you buy the right one (The factory recoil lugs are terrible because they are punched out and are not the same thickness overall).

    I find that very close Head space compresses the flex washer behind the bolt guide. So I head
    space where the bole will just barely close on a go gage (Don't force it because the head space gage is very hard and could damage your chamber) If you want .001 to .002 thousandths
    more than a go gage ,use brass shim stock between the bolt and the head space gage. (it
    wont compress like tape will.

    Buy eliminating the barrel nut you can increase barrel shank size around the chamber and do
    a better bedding job.

    With the bedding screws so close together I do a full bed under the action screws and do nothing
    under the Tang where the safety is. I encapsulate the recoil lug 100 % and do not clearance any
    part of it Unless you intend to shoot rapid fire for 10 or more shots in quick secession.

    I also bed between 1/2 and 1'' in front of the recoil lug depending on the barrel contour. The heavier
    the barrel the more support it can use. (Caution: don't bed past where the barrel shank starts to taper or it will push on the action when it starts to warm up).

    After bedding is cured 24 to 48 hrs torque bedding screws to 45 inch pounds and test fire sometimes you can tune the action bu increasing the torque in 5 inch pound increments to improve accuracy
    but don't exceed 65 inch pounds.

    For the rear trigger guard screw I apply a little Locktite and just hand tighten it just enough to hold
    (No More).

    I do not use the barrel nut for many reasons, Others do and have there way of doing this maybe
    they will chime in.

    I hope this helps you.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  10. foreign

    foreign Well-Known Member

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    JE. Thank you so much for the detailed explanation. Means alot that you took time out of your day. Gentleman and a scholar. I will try some of that when I get home. Much appreciated.