Which Garmin to buy?

Discussion in 'Maps, GPS and Google Earth' started by blacktails, Nov 2, 2010.

  1. blacktails

    blacktails Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2007
    Need a good, reliable GPS for using when hunting, especially in dense woods. From what I've read, these 3 Garmin models seem like the best candidates: Garmin 60CSx, eTrex Vista HCx, and the GPS Map 62s. Played around with a "gift" Bushnell Backtrack while hunting the last couple of weeks, and I wouldn't trust that thing at all. While just simply testing it out, the "compass" would not consistently match up with my handheld compass (sometimes not even close), and the GPS feature would most times tell me to go a different way even though I could actually see the spot I had tagged. Up to 35 degrees off sometimes when my target was only about 300 yards away, which could mean a LOT of extra walking.

    Out of the 3 Garmins, is one better than the others, and which one would be the best choice? All are in my price range, but I'm always looking for the best value for my money. Thanks.
     
  2. mike06

    mike06 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    62
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    I have the 60csx and been using it for over two years now. I can make my own maps and it is very good. The 62's are the 60 series replacement. If you look hard enough you can find the 60csx for under $200.00 .
     

  3. luvs2hnt

    luvs2hnt Member

    Messages:
    15
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2010
    It's really up to you wich you like the the best...I run the 60 csx but whould love the 62 version .... you can't loose with any of them the 60 -62 series will get signal indoors wich helps in thick west coast timber...
     
  4. I'm in the big woods 6 months a year for a living and I recently upgraded from a Lowrance iHunt to a Garmin Oregon 450, and I can say with all confidence that the Oregon is the biggest improvement in equipment that I've ever experienced. That thing is awesome in every aspect. Free downloadable topo maps online, big color touch screen, small, light, accurate. Just awesome.
     
  5. Steyr Luxus

    Steyr Luxus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    117
    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2010
    As you have indicated there are several different types of GPS units available. You must ask yourself do you need radio communication built-in with your GPS (i.e. Rhino), a unit which allows you to download/print maps and interphase with a computer using various mapping programs, moving map display, coloured display etc. Each GPS unit has a multitude of features which you may or may not ever use. I personally own a Garmin Map 76 which I use very frequently as a member of a GSAR team. It has features which enable the GSAR team to expedite to a specific search area. I additionally own an Eagle explorer. One must practice using the GPS and become familiar with all the features available to become proficient in its use. It is NEVER TO BE USED AS A SOLE SOURCE OF NAVIGATION it must be backed up with a manual compass and maps. So in order to get the most out of a GPS unit you must also be proficient in orientation skills (i.e map and compass). The mapping program which I use to interphase my GPS, create my own maps and waypoints etc is called Ozi Explorer. Some other post indicated receives well in thick timber overcast conditions, rain etc is just not true as the GPS uses satellite triangulation a minimum 3 satellite signals to give you your current position such that the more satellite station signals it can receive the more accurate you position will be given. I have personally observed my GPS becoming useless due to weather conditions and thick timer therefore reverting to my map and compass. Even with a GPS unit functioning correctly you must always cross reference to your printed map. Without this simple step you become a potential customer for GSAR teams no matter what your experience level on the water, land or in the woods. Be prepared for your outdoor adventures and file a trip report with your family, friends or local authorities as it makes finding you that much more easier when you are lost or injured as cell phone reception is also affected by weather conditions, dense forests etc.

    To sum up It's really up to you which GPS you like the the best.
     
  6. 30-378-Roy

    30-378-Roy Member

    Messages:
    13
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2011
    I own a Garmin 62st ...
    Worth every penny , plus u can get bird eye with it
    For a monthly fee
     
  7. mike06

    mike06 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    62
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    I agree with Roy. I also have a 62st very fast and reception is great. I am sure if you own a 76 and know the capabilites of it. The 62st just makes things twice as good. The only negative I have so far is that when I unplug from usb power the unit shuts down unlike my 60csx and other nuvis that I own there is no option to leave the unit on unless I am missing something.
     
  8. GPSmaps

    GPSmaps Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    91
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2009
    Blacktail - The 3 GPS receivers that you mentioned are the best 3 in my opinion. Can't go wrong with the 60CSx

    The advantages of going to the new model (GPSMAP 62s) is you have Garmin's new software and a better processor to handle more map data. The new software allows you to import Raster maps and Garmin's Bird's Eye imagery

    If you ever see yourself wanting some of these capabilities then you should get the 62s
     
  9. Magnumitis

    Magnumitis Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    406
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2010
    I don't know much about them (any GPS), but my first and only one is a Garmin 60CSx and I love it. It has already helped out a lot both hunting and on the farm.
     
  10. NW Hunter

    NW Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    372
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2010
    I elk hunt Mt. Saint Helens every year and the 60CSx has not failed me.
     
  11. Tactical.20

    Tactical.20 New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
    I bought the 60. We tried to download the topographical map from the disk that came with it, but couldn't figure out how to transfer it from pc to the Garmin unit. Do I need a chip in it to do it? I figured I would be able to down load the map with the computer.
    This thing is harder to use than I thought it would be, the book doesn't seem to explain some info good enough for an inexperienced person as myself.
     
  12. GPSmaps

    GPSmaps Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    91
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2009
    Yes, if you have the 60CSx you would need a chip in it to store map data. Or did you get the 60?

    Yes, downloading maps to the GPS can be frustrating and time consuming. That's why we offer pre-loaded chips that you can just plug into your GPS and have all the statewide hunting data you need.

    Check it out in the LRH Gear shop
     
  13. Tactical.20

    Tactical.20 New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
    yah it is the CSx one. I had trouble with running it even with the book it is complicated. I can see I would need to use it a lot to beable to use it while huntin in the mountains. The book doesn't seem to explain things very good. I couldn't see anywhere where it said to install a chip to retain the topo map in the unit. Thanks for your help! If my friend can't find a chip for me, I might order one from you!
     
  14. dumbear

    dumbear Active Member

    Messages:
    42
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    The 62 and 78 series are the latest & greatest. I have the 78S which floats and its very very good. I will not tell you that you should not buy the 60 series as they are a very good gps and have lots and lots of loyal happy owners. The 62/78 series is the current technology.