USMC web sling set up for hunting

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Roughwater, Mar 22, 2012.

  1. Roughwater

    Roughwater Well-Known Member

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    Hopefully there are a few USMC vets here that used the old style Web sling set up during rifle qualification and qualification training. It seemed to be a very effective way of steading a rifle in any position to assist in accurate shooting. Yet in all the years I have hunted I never really seriously considered using a sling as we did in the corps for hunting. What got me to thinking about this is that I just purchased a Elk license for the Colorado draw and would like to take longer than normal shots. My hunting buddy is considering buying a bipod for his rifle to this end which got me to thinking about possibly using a sling instead like we did in the corps.

    Sorry to draw that question out so long but the question is: has anyone here tried using those old marine corps rifle qualification sling techniques for steading their rifles for long range hunting? I guess the other part of that question is would a bipod be more practical?
     
  2. grit

    grit Well-Known Member

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    I've tried both. I found the sling effective, the bipod and rear bag much more so.
     

  3. Roughwater

    Roughwater Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Grit.

    We will be backpaking our camp in several miles so weight is a major consideration, but if the votes lean mostly toward the bipod, then that's what I'll probably go with.
     
  4. grit

    grit Well-Known Member

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    I understand. It's difficult to justify the size and bulk of a bipod when you cut your toothbrush in half to save an ounce. A truly lightweight version is badly needed. There's a market niche and money to be had. Sure doesn't seem like a great chore to make a carbon fiber unit.

    Personally, I nearly always carry a bipod. I shoot off them so much the weight and bulk is worth it to me. That said, you could do a whole lot with your pack and what you already carry. Backpack for a front rest, tightly rolled pair of socks or other article of clothing for a rear rest would be very versatile and effective.

    In my experimenting, I found the sling effective to six hundred-ish. compared to the bipod, it's an, "I'll make it work type of stability". This is too limiting for me. I have not practiced with the sling extensively. A real expert would likely do better. A friend of mine, Tyler, hunts with a sling extensively. You might send him a PM. He goes by 7mmstak here. He chooses to limit his shooting to 600 - 700 yards.
     
  5. angus-5024

    angus-5024 Well-Known Member

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    shooting with a sling, mind you not a USMC sling, I feel pretty good to 500 yards. With a backpack 700 yards. with a bi-pod 1k. I hike some nasty stuff and I always find it worth the weight.
    If your backpack has eccessory loops eberlestock makes a pretty lightwieght front rest that straps right to the exterior of your pack (so it doesnt take up valuable space).

    I totally agree, a lightwieght model is despratly needed. Guys pay $2000-$3000 for a spotting scope for sheep hunts, so why not pay $350-$450 for a really lightweight bi-pod. I think that a carbon fiber/titanium model would fit the bill.
     
  6. 1100 Remington Man

    1100 Remington Man Well-Known Member

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    As a Ex-Marine all I take on Backpack hunts is the sling. Yes its a weight thing. To tell the truth 99% of all Big Game is shot under 300 yds. My last MT Deer was shot at under 200 yds, we all practice for the long shot but most end up being shot in short range.........
     
  7. sp6x6

    sp6x6 Well-Known Member

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    I do a lot of high country,and my preferred bipod is my Atlas, with QD plate,12 0z. Rides in pouch unless I think I might need it quick,then on rifle. I have another rig and mount for son for a snipepod 6-8 oz. This unit is a prone to sitting, more like shock corded alum,arrow size rods.You more balance on it. I have found very useful, back against tree,elbows on knees and bipod. When I am at timberline in 2' snow, flip out and gets me out of snow for a mountain buck. I have probably had a 1/3 of my game taken at 500+, my son more so for 16 yr.old 8 of 11 game taken from 300 to 800.Depends on area and type hunting you do.With bow I have had bulls at 3 yrd,9yrd, thats the fun stuff
     
  8. grit

    grit Well-Known Member

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    My perspective is different. 99% of the game I've shot over the past several years has been between 700 and 1200 yards. I'm prepared to go further. I hunt for the shot almost as much as the animal.

    SP, I'll check out those bipods. Thanks for the info. I went Harris years ago and haven't looked at anything else.
     
  9. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    Its a great idea in concept but the problem lies in execution and end user cost.

    Would have to be a composite (metal/fiber unit) because the saddle would have to be alloy. True carbon fiber parts are actually baked like cookies. It would be very expensive, probably 3 times what a conventional bi-pod (Harris) costs today. There are other less expensive ways to cut weight. The expense would limit sales appreciably. Sort of like buying an S&B scope. Not for everyone......:)
     
  10. sp6x6

    sp6x6 Well-Known Member

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    The Snipepod is in cost factor like a Harris. I have used one for years. The Atlas is 12 0z. and twice the Harris at 3 times the cost, and hard to get because miltary and LE are first. I t is more capable. The snipepod is light and takes some user skill to optimize.As in not a flick and shoot like Harris, but light, 6 0z. prone, and works. Myself and son have taken quick ,set up shoots on it to 600, when nothing else was handy. I use bipods with terrain to optimize set up. Here is my ATLAS on a log, with my Outddorsman , pistol grip tripod,homemade saddle holding rear,at bear alley
     

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  11. grit

    grit Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the pic. Diggin bear alley.
     
  12. sp6x6

    sp6x6 Well-Known Member

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    Been many a bear rolled down bear alley:D
     

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