The elusive Porcipine @ 565yards.

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Coyboy, Jan 28, 2006.

  1. Coyboy

    Coyboy Well-Known Member

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    I went out to pull some tree stands and thought I'd grab the savage 11 in 204 for the ride. It turns out the access gate to the area was closed so I couldn't drive down the old logging trail so I decided to stop in an old sand pit and check zero.

    We'll things were not good when I couldn't hit a soda can at 100 yards. I then remembered I had the scope off and had never rezeroed after putting it back on. So I got it on realativly close thinking I could fine tune at my range later.

    Well half way home on a gravel road that cuts through a large marsh I see the signature outline of a porky in a poplar tree. I grab the lecias and get the distance across the marsh to the tree he is destroying. The scope on the gun is low end, I don't trust the click value so I have holdover values in inches taped on the stock.

    Well I know my zero is not perfect so I figure the drop around 38- 42 inches and send a 40 grainer on it's way. I hear it hit some limbs. Round 2 I see limbs fall. Round 3 nothing. Round 4 another limb falls. This gets him moving down the branch and I can see Mr. porkey coming into an opening for a clearer shot. I also picked up on the last branch I hit was about 6 inches right of the porky, there was a very slight breeze from the left but I really wasen't paying much attention to it untill now.

    I hold my elevation and about 6" of breezadge, round 5 hits him hard and he spins upside down hanging on the limb. I am about to send number 6 when he does the one arm hang and falls to the ground.

    Well that makes 2 for the year. I have a long way to go to break my record year of 109. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/blush.gif

    It's going to be fun trying. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  2. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    That is interesting that it would realize it was being shot at so far away.

    Did you ever figure out any way to make any money out of shooting pocupines?

    I went out today to shoot some ducks and squirrels. Killed one wood duck that fortuanely fell on land so I did not have to wade into the river. (I had to wade last week to get a goose and it was really cold). Then I got out my 17 Rem and decided to try it with a bipod on it for the first time. Shot 8 times at a squirrel on the ground at 100yds and never came close enough to scare it. Squirrel did not run until I gave up shooting and started walking toward it. I guess the gun doesn't like bipods.
     

  3. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    We in Wisconsin are somewhat limited in our choice of live targets compared to our western bretheren. And I have no porcupines on my land but I have shot about 20 gray and fox squirrels so far since deer hunting is over. I use my Volquartzen .17 HMR.

    The latest fox squirrel, which I shot last Sunday, was black on its entire underside including its face. I am having it mounted.
     
  4. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    When you get it mounted take a picture so we can see it.
     
  5. Dave King

    Dave King Well-Known Member

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    Len

    That's a "skid mark" from crossing pastures!
     
  6. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    Dave

    Black not brown! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif
     
  7. Dave King

    Dave King Well-Known Member

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    oh... nevermind! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/blush.gif
     
  8. Coyboy

    Coyboy Well-Known Member

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    buffalobob, I don't know if the porcipine knows whats happening, but the disturbance from the bullet impacts get them moving.

    No I haven't figured out how or where to sell the quills or hair.
     
  9. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    Well, I'm getting ready to retire so I might be able to start a second career as a porcupine skinner if the pay is good. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  10. lovdasnow

    lovdasnow Well-Known Member

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    all i have to say is DANG!!!!!!! 109 of those critters, was that a typo? over here I've maybe seen 1-2 in 18yrs of hunting hard.....wow, nice work!
     
  11. Coyboy

    Coyboy Well-Known Member

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    lovdasnow, Where are you at? There are many more in the woods than a guy realizes. I had no idea until a guy took me with him. Drive logging roads looking in the trees, spring is best, it's getting warmer but before full leaf-out.

    One of my retired niegbors has killed a hundered porkies, every year for the last 15 years. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

    Now thats a lot of vermon!
     
  12. lovdasnow

    lovdasnow Well-Known Member

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    i live in western oregon, near salem. I know they are around here, but ya never see them.
    any tips on getting them would be great, sounds like a lot of fun!
     
  13. Coyboy

    Coyboy Well-Known Member

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    lovdasnow, Sounds like your in an area with a lot of conifers, correct me if i am wrong. I'll tell ya what I know.

    Here in WI the porcipines go into a semi hibernation. Usually they hole up in a hollow tree, or a clump of heavy grass. Any where they can conserve body heat. When the temp rises above 25 degrees or so some will come out and feed others won't. So the warmer it gets during late winter and early spring the better your chances.

    In fall and early winter most porcipines I find are in conifers, with some in oak and poplar. During the middle of winter and late winter, most will be found in red oak, some in poplar. They will concentrate mostly on oak until about mid april when they switch over to mostly poplar. Some trees are more palitable to them at different times of year.

    Timing is everything early spring to leaf out is by far the best time. It's getting warmer, there hungery, and breeding season starts in may. Good days in jan. and feb. result in 2-3 porkys. Good days in late april early may net 15-20.

    Drive the back roads/logging roads and look in the trees. It's best if the area you hunt has areas of grass and marshes. This helps so you are not looking straight up, but out towards the horizon line more. Porkeys also like the marshy areas. Not sure if it has somthing to do with water, hibernating grass. Recently logged areas have good hunting, it opens up the forest and concentrates the critters into the remaining forest. Areas that are sellect cut and not clear cut also help the viewing. It takes a little bit to spot them, I usually drive a course of travel about 30-40 miles keeping my speed around 30 miles per hour if the road allows. some times it's esier to pick them out of the tree limbs when you are moving.

    good luck. Jim
     
  14. screech

    screech Well-Known Member

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    coyboy. You seem kinda like an expert on porcupine killing so What do you look for when all you have is evergreens. know there here but the only time I have seen them are at night in the headlights.