Straight Back - Behind the Rifle

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous LRH Video' started by Len Backus, Aug 28, 2010.

  1. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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  2. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    I don't disagree with anything shown or stated on the video.

    Its all well and good for the range and where possible in the mountains. Each of my 'hides' allows for convenient straight behind the rifle. Hit consistency is noticeably greater than when I have only a chance to flop down and shoot.

    It seems that the bigger the cartridge/cal the greater the importance of being straight behind the rifle.
     

  3. 4xforfun

    4xforfun Well-Known Member

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    OK, I'll disagree. :D

    You are not "behind" the rifle when you shoot off hand.

    You are not "behind" the rifle when you shoot sitting or kneeling.

    Why the change for prone?

    Just askin!!
     
  4. Jumpalot

    Jumpalot Well-Known Member

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    Being straight behind the rifle in prone will help maintain your sight picture. If you're right handed and you lay angled to the left like most do, when the rifle recoils it will end up aiming to the left when it settles.
     
  5. 4xforfun

    4xforfun Well-Known Member

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    I am going to continue to be the devils advicate here. On your point, I agree. In 1K BR, during the sighter period, I am trying to find that exact spot,
    where the gun returns to the mothball. I usualy need to get more behind the gun to acheve a perfect sight picture.


    BUT....since this is true, why not get behind the gun when kneeling, sitting , and off hand?
     
  6. Willys46

    Willys46 Well-Known Member

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    You tell me how it would be possible to get straight behind it when sitting, kneeling and standing..

    When position shooting, you HAVE to use the skeleton structure to support the gun..With a bipod you do not have to worry about support, just managing recoil. Since shooting pron, and bipod is boiled down to recoil management for quick follow up shots or watching impact, why not be in the preferred position for it..Straight back.

    I used to angle slightly, its more comfortable. But when i switched to straight behind, I could start seeing impacts and trace. I also was not fighting to get back on target especially during competitions.

    Try shooting 12, 1.5" dots at a 100 yrds. 2 shots per dot..in less than 60 sec! if you do not have good technique (behind the gun) then your going to struggle!

    Just my thoughts
     
  7. 4xforfun

    4xforfun Well-Known Member

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    Good points all. Like I said, I was just playing the "bad guy". I have never tried this position. I WILL try it in "F" class next year.

    Thanks for sharing.
     
  8. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    The Army teaches guys reflexive fire to square up with their target from the standing position (with individual weapons and not crewed served weapons for obvious reasons), so you are "behind" the rifle. This is for two reasons: 1. To mitigate the effects of recoil and get back on target faster and 2. If you take a center mass hit moving forward the plate will stop the round from penetrating (hopefully). The weakest spot on the individual body armor is on the sides, epsecially under the arm pits. This method is extremely effective at typical engagement ranges we faced in Iraq.
    If I am firing from the sitting or kneeling position it's for several reasons:
    a. The terrain or vegetation will not allow me to get lower, but I will use a tripod. sticks, or front rest of some sort and get as directly behind the rifle as possible.
    b. I need a fast more precision shot without a rest. In this case the standard firing positions apply and you use your bone support structure.
    c. They make us use (c) on our qualification range.:rolleyes:
    The limiting factors on the position to use are: type and weight of weapon being used, (not gonna try a standing off hand shot with my .338 EDGE), time you have to engage, range to target, terrain/vegetation/obstacles (and maybe for me available cover and concealment).

    I practice squaring up with the target with my "regular" hunting rifles in case I do need to take a quick shot at game. The limiting factor is gonna be the weapon system itself (size&weight) and how much I can control it.
     
  9. squirrelduster

    squirrelduster Well-Known Member

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    I always shoot at an angle but will give this a try next time out to see how effective it is.
     
  10. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    +1

    Only downside I see is if you are laying there in wait for a long time, might be a little more uncomfortable.?

    I've always been at an angle when shooting prone/bipod. I will give this technique a shot next time I shoot that way. Never hurts to try something new.
     
  11. joe0121

    joe0121 Well-Known Member

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    In the Marine Corps circa 2002 we were taught the "combat prone" with the body strait behind the rifle. the idea being to create a small silhouette. But for the rifle range it was at an angle. Now shooting an m16 with iron sights sling supported and shooting a scoped bolt gun bi-pod support is not an apples to apples comparison. The snipers I know (which is exactly 4 that I know personally) shoot strait behind the rifle.

    it's interesting how tactics change and how some are slow to accept it. It used to be that when you fired a pistol the strong side arm was to be held strait out with no bend at the elbow.

    Or during me era the three point sling. when I first got in you would be severely verbally berated for using a three point sling, now they are issued by the units.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2011
  12. RMulhern

    RMulhern Well-Known Member

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    I disagree!
     
  13. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    I am in total agreement with getting behind the rifle. It had made a major difference with my accuracy with 1000 yard+ shots. With sitting and other upright positions I try to align myself to keep a straight back, unobstructed movement of the rifle as much as possible.
     
  14. CA48

    CA48 Well-Known Member

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    I have tryed to stay as straight as I can behind the rifle while shooting prone. In my experience it makes a difference. When I'm not straight behind the rifle and shoot it is easy to tell at range. Since I shoot right handed it's natural for the body to be angled to left. When I Shoot and my body is angled the cross hairs will end up high and right after the shot, and my POI will be to the right. When I am directly behind the rifle and shoot my cross hairs will end up directly above my target. I feel form is the biggest factor in executing a long range shot. Errors in form don't always show at your sight in or zero distance.