Shooting rest to practical hunting situation

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by rryun, Aug 12, 2012.

  1. rryun

    rryun Member

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    Did some load testing in my 7mag and found the best load from shooting off a rest. now since this is a hunting rifle oi wanted a sturdy base so i desided to put on a bipod. well needless to say it blew my groups wide open. My question is should i just shoot off a pack of is there a PROPER way to shoot with a bipod because i dont have this problem with the same setup in 22-250. just dont want to be stuck with a "bench gun"
     
  2. Joe King

    Joe King Well-Known Member

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    yea put the bipod back on if you want to use it for hunting, then go back to work on load development. If your developing a load for hunting you should finish up the development from field positions so get off the bench and go prone. Not trying to sound like I'm getting on ya :).

    Think about it for a minute, your using rests and sand bags, leadsled ect on the bench, but as you just saw it changes things when you change your rest. So does it make more sense to do everything simulating field positions, or do your load workup and practice from a bench in a benchrest like manner and wonder why things aren't the same in the field.

    I found this out the same way you did years ago, so now when I set a rifle up to be shot in a certain manner I shoot it in that manner always. I hate nasty surprises like that.
     

  3. angus-5024

    angus-5024 Well-Known Member

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    im betting your rifle has stress in the action or on the barrel. Changing from a solid bench rest to a bi-pod should'nt throw a group, It may change Point of impact because of the difference in shooting form, but shouldt open up a group (at least not alot).

    I would ensure that the barrel has a proper free-float. If it has an injection olded stock, fold a piece of thick computer paper twice (4x the thickness of the paper) and make sure that it slides all the way down from the tip of the fore arm to just infront of the recoil lug. If it has a good wood or fiberglass stock the clearance can be half that.

    To ensure that your action is stress free have it bedded (if not done already) and make sure that your action screws are set to the correct torque.

    If you have an injection molded stock you may need to stiffen the foreend with old arrow shafts and epoxy. when the full weight of the rifle is on the very tip of the forend (as with a bi-pod) there can be a substantial diffrence in stress on the stock form when its on bags. with fiberglass the forend is much stiffer and you can count on the stock not hitting the barrel. This is especially important when you have a rifle with a heavy barrel and big optics.

    One of my rifles has an injection molded stock, and I have 3/16 per side. I can see that sometimes the gap is bigger on one side compared to the other, then moves back to normal with temp. changes.
     
  4. COBrad

    COBrad Well-Known Member

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    I do a lot of load development from the bench, and don't expect anything to change when I go to the bipod. I agree with angus, sounds like a stock problem.
     
  5. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Go here and read:Bugholes from Bipod

    Then google on "bugholes from bipod" there is an other more descriptive article out there about the same fella.

    BTW, If it shoot off the sand bags/tripod on the bench there is no good reason, other than the driver for not doing the same prone off of bags/tripod/bipod.

    Unless you're a complete incompetent (as I am with Harris type bipods:rolleyes:) I simply have not been able to master the spring loaded Harris types.:rolleyes:
     
  6. mike33

    mike33 Well-Known Member

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    I read that bugholes from a bipod. Good read, enjoyed. I always shoot my edge from bipods even tinkering around at 100 yards and have some bugholes my self. When im lr jug shooting i always use the bipod because im trying to be as close for hunting purpose i can.
    Mike
     
  7. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Make that three ditto's.

    Something is either wrong with the technique or the set up.
     
  8. rryun

    rryun Member

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    savage accustock accutrigger DNZ tac one peice rings and zeiss conquest. all bolts are tightened to specs and all shooting has been from prone. only difference has been my left hand holding on stock on the rest like actual hunting say like off a pack, with a bipod it was under the butt to elevate and sturdy.
     
  9. texas270

    texas270 Well-Known Member

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    sounds exactly like what I just went threw with a small twist. in taking my new load from bench to a tripod (I have to shoot over tall grass in flatlands) my patterns moved a few inches to the right. took me a long time to figure out what the heck was wrong, but if finally became clear that I was simply setting up to the gun differently. slightly different position on my shoulder and slightly differnet hand position and grip strenght moved the pattern.

    the gun and the load were fine....