?Sako Extractor?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by kc, Jan 12, 2011.

  1. kc

    kc Well-Known Member

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    Why would a person change the extractor design on a Remington?
    is this hard to do?
     
  2. MTBULLET

    MTBULLET Well-Known Member

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    If your's is a newer rem. 700 and the extractor's not broke, don't "fix" it. However, if it IS broken, I like the SAKO extractor mod., and yes, it's rather difficult without the proper equipment, mill, fixture, etc.
     

  3. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    "If it's not broken, don't fix it",,,,,, my sediments, exactly. If you're changing bolt face dimention or it is broken, I won't do the "Sako Style", only M-16 type which is retained by a 'hinge pin' . The Sako Style relies on spring tension and could, possibly, escape and cause injury. I prefer M-16 type made by Badger. And yes, they require milling & drilling of the bolt.
     
  4. specweldtom

    specweldtom Well-Known Member

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    MT and Shortgrass covered the how and why not to. As for the why, the only good reason I know is when you open a Remington bolt face. For starters, the old riveted extractors have an assymetrical cut that is not easy to expand for the larger diameter case. Also, Brownell's hasn't had magnum Remington extractors for a long time. I never tried Remington, so I don't know. I actually like both the Sako and M-16 style extractors, but neither is easy for me to install.

    I don't know anything about the newer un-riveted extractors, but would probably install a Sako style if I had to. PT&G bolts come machined for the Sako style extractor.

    Bottom line, we're in agreement. Don't do it if you don't have to.

    Tom
     
  5. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    I went with an M16 extractor with a reworked ejector pin on my 700, and never looked back. The Remington extractor bent the rim on every case I fired, and the's why. Some folks say don't do it and others will say do it. I'm not going there, but it fixed my problems 100%. Plus it drops the spent case about four inches to my right side every time. I never have to hunt for a fired case.
    gary
     
  6. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

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    The Sako alteration became popular about 12 years ago. It was the "in thing" to have done on a rifle.

    Mostly when folks started changing bolt face diameters to accommodate larger (magnum) cartridges.

    The riff (and reason why I won't install one or even service them) is with a twin lug 90* rotation bolt action the extractor clock position is almost directly in line with the ejection port side raceway when the bolt is in battery. One of the principle reasons why a non rotating extractor is particularly nice to have in a lot of instances. I'm not a particular fan of Savage actions, but they also did a very good job of mitigating escaping gasses by use of a non rotating bolt head.

    The sako extractor is retained by a spring, plunger, and clever mechanical interaction. There is essentially nothing preventing it from flying out of the receiver in the event of a cartridge separation. Sometimes with very serious consequences.

    I know of two cases personally that resulted in emergency eye surgery.

    In studies conducted by other smiths the factory extractor actually out performed the Sako as well. The tests involved rigidly mounting the bolt and applying a steady load to the point of failure.

    If you insist on changing it, the M-16 extractor is a much better alternative. It is at least retained by a cross pin.
     
  7. specweldtom

    specweldtom Well-Known Member

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    I've been thinking about what Chad said. The instructions with the Sako extractor kit said to drill (or mill) the perpindicular pocket for the extractor peg on down into the firing pin channel. If a primer perforated or case separated, some of the high pressure gasses will blow back around the firing pin and up through the pocket. All that holds the extractor in the bolt is the end of a very small spring-loaded plunger that extends maybe .060" or so over its back edge. Between pressure from gasses escaping around the bolt face, and pressure in the firing pin channel, It would seem possible for the extractor to be blown off.

    On the other hand, the M-16 type extractor has a smaller perpindicular hole for the coil spring that pushes up on the back end of the extractor. That hole does not drill into the firing pin channel, so only gasses escaping around the bolt face would be trying to blow the extractor off. Seems to me that combined with the cross-pin that holds the extractor in, it would have a much better chance to stay in place in the event of a blown primer, primer perforation, or case head failure.

    Since I've never had a Remington extractor failure or a Sako style or M-16 style failure, I don't know if any of the extractor parts can fly out. Best I can recall, they're mostly, if not completely inside the receiver ring when the bolt is in battery, but I never underestimate what 65,000 psi might do.

    If I missed something, or got something wrong, please say so. If anything, it's made me more certain that it's better to leave the Rem extractor alone unless you have to change it.

    Tom