Round 2 with Factory 338 Rum

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by mike33, Aug 11, 2012.

  1. mike33

    mike33 Well-Known Member

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    Took the 338 rum back up to Loosesnipers range today and results was the same as i posted last monday. We start off with a milk jug at 1060, gong at 1100, and another jug at 1140. Its a slight up hill only where tagets are so spotting your shot can be very clear for adjustments. We run the numbers again on exbal with the 2760 vel. 300 smk 84 degree 28.31 press.@ sea level and worked perfect again. With the heat and a factory barrel i would only take 3 shots st a time. I failed to hit anything but my misses was so dang close they would of been deer kills. The main factor for test was i had elevation everytime but wind was very tough. Each yardage i would hit close enough to kick dirt on the
    jug. I know feel after twice out with this rifle i know the vel. is 2760. Now i just have to bear down on the windage game.
    Mike
     
  2. bigbuck

    bigbuck Well-Known Member

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    I know how you feel Mike. I read once were Shawn Carlock said that the wind seperates a good shooter from an exceptional shooter , now I truly know what he means. I'm not giving up until I get the wind game down.
    Good luck and keep up the good shooting .
    Thats one fine job to do it all with a factory rifle!
     

  3. mike33

    mike33 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, i dont consider myself a good shooter but know a little bit more than my neighbors. :) I have the pleasure of having loosesniper as a friend where lots of times its a sat. night thing. He has a farm and an experienced lr shooter where we mainly with the terrain have to start at 1060 and went as far 1900. I didnt bring them out today but i have a pair of kowa highlanders maes it sweet to spot can see the bullet flying most of the time. From what i have learned its a great feeling to see that jug full of water splatter but how close your misses are will keep you in the hunting game. think about it a clorax bottle is pretty well a head shot on most big game animals.
    Mike
     
  4. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    No question but that wind is the toughest thing to deal with at long range. Depending on the terrain and conditions it can change three or four times between you and the target at 1,000yds.

    Technology will only get you so far, you will have to really learn to read the wind between you and the target.

    The best method I know is on flat ground pick three points between you and the target and the target itself and compare what you are seeing as far as wind effect at each of those points to come up with an "average" so to speak.

    Master the wind and you own the battlefield or in this case the shooting range.:D
     
  5. bigbuck

    bigbuck Well-Known Member

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    +1 on what you have said . Just one question .
    Lets say the wind is blowing from the 3 o clock position to the 7 o clock position at the GUN.
    Then say at the 6oo yard mark it is blowing from 3 to 9 ocloclk .

    Lastly at the 1000 yard target it is blowing from 9 o clock to 3 o clock?

    What would I dial for the windage ?

    Not to high jack your thread mike but maybe you guys can help me see how this is done thanks
     
  6. loosesniper2000

    loosesniper2000 Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys, I'll throw my 2 cents worth in here. First Mike's 338 Rum is sweet, for a factory action and barrel the gun performs outstanding. He put another stock and brake on it and it's a pleasure to shoot!
    To try and answer the above question I'd say this.
    The bullet is going to be affected mostly when it's unstable. Shooting the 300's it may take 100 yds or so before the yaw is corrected. Take a spinning top for example. Once you spin it, the top wobbles at first before it's stabilized, this is true with bullets as well. So the moment the bullet comes out of the barrel, the wind will affect it most compared to downrange. If you have a cross wind from 3-9 the projectile will continue on that path until it meets a counter resistance. However it will never stop and go straight. I competed in 1000 yd benchrest for years and always paid attention to the wind closest to me. I never looked downrange.
    There's a thing know as gyroscopic procession that explains this but I think people tend to make too much out of the whole process.
    To prove my point I have a 1000yd I.B.S target I shot with a 300 WBY using 240 SMK with a score of 50 and a group of 4.040" with 3 shots touching across the center X
    Hope this helps!
     
  7. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    I would figure it like this.

    90% value out to 600yds. 100% value for 600yds to wherever the transition point appears to be. I would then subtract full value in the opposite direction from the transition point to the target.

    Basically figure three separate windage adjustments and add/subtract as those values change.
     
  8. ammohouse

    ammohouse Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like it's a shooter.
    But just to throw a wrench in the works
    Missing milk jugs doesn't make it a deer gun.
    I know I'm gonna get flamed for that last statement but this is exactly what folks use as fodder to discredit long range hunting.
    Don't go stringing me up just yet, I love long range shooting as much as the next guy.
    I have made some pretty good shots and I have made some that I shouldn't have taken.
    If I've created too much of a stink over this, Moderators feel free to delete my post.
    I just think hitting your target at 800 yds is more important than missing at 1140.
     
  9. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Your point is well taken but the truth is, a deer has a much larger kill zone than a milk jug.

    You've got about 36" from mid neck to the third rib and about 12-16" vertical depending on the size/species of deer.

    If a shot is slightly left or right of the milk jug it would still produce a very dead deer with a clean one shot kill in most cases.
     
  10. mike33

    mike33 Well-Known Member

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    I didnt take offence to your opinion but maybe you didnt understand my whole point. I have had this gun out twice and for a reason and that was to figure out my velocity. My chrono isnt working and it didnt give me the correct vel. when i first got my edge 2 years ago . I had to figure my own by shooting than going to exbal for my drop charts. This is what i was doing and my elevation was right there so i was succesful these 2 times out shooting at 3 different distances tofigure vel. to make my drop chart. The second time last sat. i had some tough wind conditions and i only shoot it 3 times since it was 84 degree and let barrel cool down. My misses was with in 2-3" to left or right elevation was great thats not bad from a taget being a clorax bottle or milk jug. Yes, i would of loved to smacked dead center but i didnt. Now since i did my testing as my thread is about testing i am ready to bear down to be more proficient than trying to figure out my gun. OPen up your frig. and look at your milk jug put your finger 2" to the left or right it would of been 90% deer kill but i did this project for a back up elk rifle.
    Mike
     
  11. ammohouse

    ammohouse Well-Known Member

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    I know what you meant, it just sounded a little screwy at first.
    I understand a kill zone is larger than a milk jug.