Rookie needs help w/ dies

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by texan79, May 27, 2010.

  1. texan79

    texan79 Well-Known Member

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    Mar 28, 2010
    New to the reloading scene, so I want to verify that I understand the theory correctly.

    I am going to begin reloading for my 7mm Rem Mag. After my cases are fire formed, I should be able to use a Redding neck die correct? Skip the whole resize for better accuracy?

    Also need a bullet seating die. What brands do I need to be looking at? Any help or recomendations will be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.
     

  2. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    Oct 8, 2007
    "I am going to begin reloading for my 7mm Rem Mag. After my cases are fire formed, I should be able to use a Redding neck die correct? Skip the whole resize for better accuracy?

    Not exactly. Neck sizing sometimes produce better accuracy but it's not common with factory rifles. Neck sizing sometimes gives better case life but not by much and maybe not at all. If you really want best case life with least fuss, get a Lee Collet Neck Sizer. And, no matter what you use for the necks, you will surely need a Full Length sizer die as well.


    "Also need a bullet seating die. What brands do I need to be looking at? Any help or recomendations will be greatly appreciated."

    Honestly, at this point in your loading career, it won't matter; ALL dies are really quite good and it's rare for the much more costly Redding Comp and Forster BR dies to make any visible difference with factory rifles. After you get groups down to maybe a half MOA you MIGHT see a difference with the more expensive dies.

    ALL the expensive "micrometer" seating heads do is allow us to make OAL changes in descrete steps a bit more easily. We can do it just as well with any seater but it will take a bit more time while using a dial caliper.

    Dies, (and presses) by brand is far over-rated. ( Personal predjuices aside, on average I think we can load the same high quality ammo on any press made today.) For accuracy, and on average, dies come in two tiers; Forster/Redding are tied for first place, everything else is tied in a close wad for second place.
     

  3. RockZ

    RockZ Well-Known Member

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    As boomtube said the Redding and Forster dies are better, especially if you have a custom rig.
    And believe me I have a bunch of very expensive dies.

    BUT,I have been amazed at the loads and accuracy I've been able to produce with the Lee Deluxe die set that comes with a full length die, a seater, and my favorite, the neck collet die.
    1/2 moa in a factory rifle.
    Don't get the set with the crimp die.

    In fact that is what I am using for my Weatherby Mark V 7mm Rem mag.
    I am now going to put it in a laminated thumbhole stock so I will have to do a little load tweaking.

    I use the collet die and have had great results and when the cartridge starts to get hard to chamber, I use the full length die to set the shoulder back.
    They are very good for a set costing about $25.
     
  4. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    "...the Lee Deluxe die set... use the collet (neck) die and have had great results and when the cartridge starts to get hard to chamber, I use the full length die to set the shoulder back. They are very good for a set costing about $25. '

    One small correction: The Lee Deluxe die set is very good at any price! :D