Remington Firearms

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by ol mike, Sep 7, 2007.

  1. ol mike

    ol mike Well-Known Member

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    Is it me or do you guys think remington prices are getting too high ?

    I looked at some of the prices at Buds guns they usually have good prices so i'm sure other dealers are basically the same.

    A plastic stock -blued with sights 7-08 for $555 seems like a lot of money .

    And why doesn't remington build a sendero in 338 rum -the one rifle in their line-up that makes the big magnum's recoil tolerable.
    All the better for gunsmiths i guess.
     

  2. rdc

    rdc Active Member

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    Yup. Too high. Customer bought a new 243 SPS Varmint. The rifle was full of metal shavings and dirt. UGLY plastic stock. I was not impressed with the trigger or the finish. I was not impressed. If you love Remington's, I'd start buying older rifles just for the actions.
     

  3. Bigcat_hunter

    Bigcat_hunter Well-Known Member

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    I have a .338 RUM in Sendero. I looked for it for 3 years though. They stopped making them before I could afford them and luckily I found a new unfired one from this web site from a guy that bought one and never used it.
     
  4. specweldtom

    specweldtom Well-Known Member

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    The prices have gone up $100-150 in the last 6 months. I don't know if they are just following the climbing Winchester prices, or if I heard right and Remington has new owners.

    I have always been able to find Rem donor rifles for $350-450, but not any more. I may finally be able to justify recommending custom actions now. If I have to pay $500-600 for a donor and then spend $250-300 cleaning it up, that's close enough to some of the customs to make sense. Also, I can only get about $20 for a take-off barrel and about the same for one of the Tupperware stocks; used to get $50-75 each for a barrel or a wood stock. Selling both of them was enough to cover a reamer or something.

    Enough whining, Tom
     
  5. ol mike

    ol mike Well-Known Member

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    A 338rum and the 7stw are very hard to come by ,there was a 7stw on 24hr campfire about 4-5 months ago -a rough been hunted with -but not shot much.I should have bought it but the timing wasn't right ,i think it was $650.

    I bought a new 12ga rem 870 for coyote hunting -the blueing looked like flat-black overspray.Also bought an xr-100 22-250 and the fit -finish and accuracy are as good as i'd expect in a custom rifle -flawless !

    I have a 7mm broughton barrel on order and am torn between putting it on a 700adl or selling the adl and getting a custom action .

    I think it's steel prices that have driven up costs but i could be wrong .
     
  6. blackco

    blackco Well-Known Member

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    Metal prices are going up, energy prices to build the gun are going up, etc. but that only accounts for a fraction of the increase in price. I know that I am cinical but I think it is a business decision; increase the price until sales drop off then stabalize there. As rdc pointed out, customers are still buying them so the price isn't too high.

    That's just my opinion, and along with 25-cents it won't get you a cup of coffee.
     
  7. britz

    britz Well-Known Member

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    Metal is going up but it doesn't seem like savage is going up at the same rate as remington. I for one, think they are getting a little pricey.
     
  8. rdc

    rdc Active Member

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    Look what remington did to the Mark X. Took a $250 barreled action and but a Boyd laminate on it and sell it wholesale for $500. This tells me that it's a business tactic, and not the result of economic realities of production.

    Like he said above, we are whining.
     
  9. CatShooter

    CatShooter Well-Known Member

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    They are ALL $250 barreled actions - what do you think a Rem 700 barreled action cost... less than $150!
    When you send them in for repairs, they just throw them in the crusher, cuz they are too cheap to make, to waste time repairing.


    .
     
  10. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

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    I can by a Predator for what it costs to make a Remmy a good action for my purposes and in the end I have a Predator not a Remmy.
     
  11. Wallowa Hunter

    Wallowa Hunter Active Member

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    I just bought a Remington Sendero II in 300 Ultra Mag. I paid $979 for it.

    I know it was a bit high compared to some interenet prices but it was in my local shop kinda out here in th emiddle of nowhere....

    I can tell you this....Remington is going downhill.
    The trigger pull was at 7.9 pounds!
    The flutes on the barrel were actually sharp enough to cut your skin if you held the rifle by the barrel and let the weight of it slide downward thru your hands.
    The rear reciever screw was sticking up about .080 of an inch, and actually had a sharp burr on it.
    The Sendero II has a polished stainless finish. Right in the middle of the stamping "Remington" it looked as if some slipped and messed up the finish in a spot about 3/8'' of an inch wide.

    Overall I am not impressed. For a $1000 rifle I expected more.

    I dont mind tinkering with things, so I fixed all the problems myself. I deburred all of the flutes, worked over the trigger. Trimmed and deburred the rear screw and stripped the whole thing down and gave it a good glass beading. So now it looks like the original Senderos........Back when they made decent guns!

    I feel like I should send Remington the bill for finishing their shoddy work....
     
  12. specweldtom

    specweldtom Well-Known Member

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    Remington prices

    I haven't bought a Remington rifle in 3-4 years except to use as a donor. When I quote a price for a custom rifle on a Remington action I always include the cost of truing the receiver face and lapping the locking lugs, with the warning that it may need more work than that. On newer guns, I also include an aftermarket trigger to replace the crappy factory trigger. I have seen rifles with rust in the joint on both sides of the recoil lug. Two rifles had been belt sanded on the face of the receiver before they were blued; One took .0055" to clean up the gouges and crooked face, the other one only took .004" to clean up. One had a huge burr between the receiver face and recoil lug ??? I didn't record how much it took to clean up. I take pictures and tell people I have "dirty pictures". The bottom lug on one long action had never touched the locking shoulder in the receiver. Many have less than 20% contact and most of them are uneven.

    In spite of all this, I like to build on Remington actions. Cleaned up, they make fine rifles, capable of phenomenal accuracy.

    My point? Unless a customer has a donor action; at todays prices, instead of $500-600 for a true receiver that I furnish, they're looking at $700-900 with a new trigger. That's in the range for a custom action, and stops some of the folks that I really like to do work for.

    Tom
     
  13. rdc

    rdc Active Member

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    If you can get ME one for $150, I'll buy all you can send buddy good...
     
  14. CatShooter

    CatShooter Well-Known Member

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    It's what they cost the company. If you want to move to Illion NY, you can work for Rem and get all the cheap rifles you want.

    .