PSE TAC 15/15i bolts

Discussion in 'PSE TAC 15/15i Crossbow Hunting Forum' started by Len Backus, Feb 13, 2011.

  1. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    I sell PSE TAC 15/15i bolts in the LRH Gear Shop. Buy PSE TAC 15 bolts/arrows

    But PSE calls them arrows becasue they are 26.25 inches long, not as short as a "bolt".
     

  2. Konrad

    Konrad Well-Known Member

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    I believe they also refer to the completed shafts as arrows because they posses actual string holding nocks verses the typical crossbow flat or half moon type nock.
     

  3. jon.henry755

    jon.henry755 Well-Known Member

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    I totally agree with Konrad on this one. To my knowledge nobody has ever produced a length rating where bolts begin and end versus where arrows begin and end.

    Then again PSE might just be using the terminology as a differentiation for their crossbow product.

    No matter what you want to call them, Len's point was that he sells them!

    Jon
     
  4. Super 91

    Super 91 Well-Known Member

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    I robbed this from another site, but the information is pretty much on target...


    “Da, well the crossbow ain’t archery `quipment cause it shoots bolts, not arrows!” claims the anti-crossbow expert.
    [​IMG]Jeez, I hate it when I hear that statement! I would like to put forward some simple information to clear up this murky subject, once and for all. The modern hunting crossbow does not shoot bolts, it shoots ARROWS!
    If a projectile has a guidance system in the form of feathers or vanes on the end of it, it is an ARROW!
    Can we say the word “ARROW” boys and girls? Crossbows shoot ARROWS! You can argue, rationalize and fantasize, but the fact remains – IT IS AN ARROW!
    [​IMG]
    The crossbow bolt is a short dowel-type projectile that was once used for indoor and outdoor target shooting. It is seldom, if ever used in the twenty-eighth (or so) century of crossbow shooting. Now is time for crossbow shooters, arrow and crossbow manufacturers and even those opposed to the existence of crossbows to all crawl onto the very same page and come to the realization that the crossbow shoots arrows, not bolts.
    [​IMG]
    Target bolt shot during International Match competition resembles a mechanic’s bolt in some ways, including light treading on the tip. The string end of the bolt, above is notched to insure exact bolt alignment. Those who scorn our weapon of choice claim that we shoot bolts because they are shorter than those shot from vertical archery equipment. Okay, let me get this straight, if that is the definition of a bolt in their superior little minds, then archers that shoot short arrows from an over-draw are shooting bolts, right?
    I dare say that if you walked up to a vertical archer who is using short arrows with an over-draw system and say, “Hey Dude, really good looking bolts you are shooting there!” there would be hell to pay.
    How about going to a junior archery league where youngsters are using 18-inch youth arrows? Give those kids on the shooting line the all clear and then tell them they can go pull their bolts out of the targets. Even a newbie child knows that they are shooting arrows and not bolts and they will, in no uncertain terms, let you know that you do not have a clue as to what you are talking about.
    [​IMG]Why then, do some of us as mature adults insist on calling our arrows, bolts? I understand that a lot of folks just do not know any better. It is a simple matter of knowledge washing away the ignorance. Well, if you are reading this article, then you can no longer plead ignorance! Start calling your projectiles what they are, ARROWS!
    If you are shooting something similar to the photographs included with this article, you are shooting bolts. If you are hunting with this type of projectile, you should seriously consider taking up another sport, because “you ain’t right”!
    However, if you are hunting with a 20 to 24 inch projectile with feathers or vanes at the nock end, you are shooting an arrow. Get used to the fact and call them what they are.
    If you are an arrow manufacturer and you are manufacturing and selling projectiles for crossbows, please take note. If those projectiles look like the photographs in this article, you are indeed manufacturing and marketing bolts. In that case, please feel free to call them bolts. However, if you are manufacturing projectiles that look like arrows, complete with vanes or feathers on the nock end, then you are manufacturing ARROWS. For Heaven's sake, please call them ARROWS, because that is what they are.
    It is time to end the arrow/bolt confusion, people. Crossbow hunters shoot arrows, not bolts. I have heard it said that it doesn’t really make any difference what you call them. Excuse me?

    • I have also heard it said that a whitetail buck has nice horns, you know what I mean?
      NO! A buck has ANTLERS; cows and automobiles have horns.
    • I got a bunch of polecats under my barn, you know what I mean?
      NO! You have a bunch of SKUNKS under your barn! Polecats live in Europe and Asia.
    • Boy there sure is a good crop of akerns, this year, you know what I mean?
      NO! There is a good crop of ACORNS this year! There is no such thing as an akern!
    • My crossbow sure does shoot a bolt fast, you know what I mean?
      NO! Your crossbow shoots an ARROW fast, not a bolt. A bolt is a short featherless dowel like projectile once used for target practice at indoor and outdoor ranges.
    [​IMG]
    Just because a lot of folks choose, for whatever reason, to mislabel something, it doesn’t make it right, you know what I mean? So….Let’s all, shooters AND manufacturers, get in the practice of properly addressing our projectiles for what the really are – ARROWS! NOW SAY AMEN!
     
  5. jon.henry755

    jon.henry755 Well-Known Member

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    Amen!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I love the forcefulness behind the truth.

    You go boy!!!!

    Jon
     
  6. Konrad

    Konrad Well-Known Member

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    Not to throw any wood on the fire but…traditionally, a crossbow bolt is of times also referred to as a quarrel due to the square shape of its head (armor piercing). This same point is also referred to as “bodkin” point on medieval arrows. The design was purely for warfare and did not have a hunting application.

    My brief research shows a true arrow derives lift from use of fletching verses a bolt having a bare “shaft”. I believe the term “bolt” is indeed a carry over from medieval times, carelessly carried over but there it is.
    Technically, any projectile wearing vanes or feathers is an arrow.

    Modern catalogs differentiate between bolts and arrows by the type of nock the fletched projectile wears. In modern parlance, any projectile that clips or snaps onto the string and can hang from the string by nock alone is termed an arrow. Many archery suppliers sell “bolts” wearing either flat or half moon type nocks that do not attach to the string.

    The projectile is held in the firing position by virtue of friction between the cock vane or feather and the rail groove.

    Vernacular…fun stuff!
     
  7. OkieBowie

    OkieBowie Well-Known Member

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    I know this much about bolts vs. arrows debate - only a crazy person would attempt shoot one of those tiny bolts out of PSE TAC-15. :rolleyes: