Need help finding the right boat for bears.

Discussion in 'Bear Hunting' started by HuntFarther, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. HuntFarther

    HuntFarther Well-Known Member

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    I am trying to find a boat that would work in idaho to run across the river to kill bears. We see alot of bears but always seem to be across the river. This is mainly due to how steep the mountains are in conjunction with the roads. So what I am looking for is not a raft I have one and would not be ideal. I am needing a boat that two guys could pack down to the river, just to zip straight across to walk up and get bears. I would find the calmest spot possible but unsure what type of boat is needed. I have heard a boat similar to a jon boat but with a vhull is what I need. Also unsure what size motor is needed. Thanks for any help.
     
  2. sp6x6

    sp6x6 Well-Known Member

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    Id get a phantom jet john,camo,the kind you can drive your four wheeler in.Then I would skip ID and head straight to AK. And shoot some big bears and other stuff.The Phantom is my dream boat.:D
     

  3. HuntFarther

    HuntFarther Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the response but seem not like something I could only use once or twice a year and not worry about it.
     
  4. TheFishBox

    TheFishBox Well-Known Member

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    just get a ten foot aluminum with a v hull and put an eight horse on it for the most part it will be able to break waves as long as you are going straight into them and with an eight horse it will cruise right along. Plus it will be easy to carry.
     
  5. HuntFarther

    HuntFarther Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the help that is what I was thinking have you had any experience with this type of setup?
     
  6. TheFishBox

    TheFishBox Well-Known Member

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    yeah quite a bit only thing is you have to be careful when cutting across waves because alot of these boats have very little freeboard so if there is much for waves you need to be heading straight into them.

    The eight horse motor will scoot pretty good but you aren't going to be setting any records. If you want to go fast you need a small zodiac but depending on how far it is to the water you won't be able to get it down let alone back to the truck.
     
  7. HuntFarther

    HuntFarther Well-Known Member

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    My goal is to find spots where the waves are down and it is just the river flowing and go across. That is why I need something lighweight to get down to the river. I just don't want to be playing on these rivers in the rapid type water. Just get on and across as quickly as can be being weight is a factor. I have been looking and asking around for a boat like this. I would buy one and go to some of the small rivers around here and test the abilities of the me and the boat. Then I would know what I can do long before I find a situation.
     
  8. rooster740

    rooster740 Well-Known Member

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    My dad has a small inflatable pontoon type boat that he crosses the salmon river and others to fish steelhead and salmon. He is alone and takes all his gear and that river is not exactly dead water. Works good for accessing public land by river only, and geese during hunting season.
    Food for thought
     
  9. Cold Trigger Finger

    Cold Trigger Finger Well-Known Member

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    What you NEED to safely do what you want is a Zodiak or Avon inflatable. I know a bunch of guys who have died hunting with boats. A non rigid hull inflatable with a kicker bracket and a 4 horse kicker with an integral fuel tank. 2 stroke.

    Take a ferry trip thru southeast Alaska sometime. All those white crosses you will see on the beaches is where people died. The bulk of them were hunting. . Getting in a small boat isabout the most dangerous thing u can do in Alaska.

    a
    A 10' skiff is a funeral waiting to happen.
    a non rigid hull inflatable is far, far more sea worthy. A good set of oars i preferable to an outboard. And it will save packing about 60 lbs. A jon boa t is more stable than a v hull but neither is safe for 2 adult men to cross a river
     
  10. HuntFarther

    HuntFarther Well-Known Member

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    We have a 14' avon but I was just scared with things going wrong. And this is the exact reason why all these bears are there. No one can get to them to kill them. Otherwise you wouldn't see them all day long. I think we just are going to keep looking for other options, such as new areas. I would have to know someone with first hand experience that is doing this. But I do appreciate all the help.
     
  11. Cold Trigger Finger

    Cold Trigger Finger Well-Known Member

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    One of my best friends uses an Avon, 10' I think it is. We anchor the cabin fiberglass boat and take the raft to the beach

    We've been doing it for decades. Were on salt water where he lives. But its nice and light, safe and durable. How big or class are these rivers. Is it like Hell's Canyon? Hundred yards wide or half mile?
     
  12. Mike 338

    Mike 338 Well-Known Member

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    Canoe
     
  13. HuntFarther

    HuntFarther Well-Known Member

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    The slope on the rivers make them flow so fast. The one trouble is that they don't actually have places to get in and out of the rivers. Once the runoff hits they are big time whitewater rivers. The rivers are the lockshaw and maybe the clearwater. Typically always less than 200 yards wide and usually less than 100 yards.
     
  14. Mike 338

    Mike 338 Well-Known Member

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    I don't know those rivers very well but most rivers can be scouted from the road for a decent crossing. Getting canoe and gear to the put-in might be a hassle but i'd focus on "good crossing" and develop a plan around that. I'm fairly comfortable in a canoe in Class II and some non-technical Class III rapids. Crossing swift water in any craft can be dicey if you aren't competent to do it. I honestly wouldn't recommend jumping into a situation like that till you've worked your way up to it. It's not like it's that difficult but whatever craft you use, you need to do what you do with confidence and power or you may well go swimming.

    I like canoes because they're easy and don't require much, if any management. You can carry them on top of your rig and there's nothing mechanical to consider. Get one in Royalex and they can take a beating when sliding down a steep bank or skidding some rocks in the river. For river work, don't think cheap. Hull design is important if you don't want to go swimming. I mostly paddle solo but if you paddle tandem, that's another thing you'll should get some practice doing so you're working together. I have a Novacraft Prospector 16. It's general hull design is sorta like the pick-up truck of canoes. Not the best at any one thing but decent at everything for a guy who's just looking to get the job done. For a guy who knows what he's doing, squirting across a river to hunt and coming back with your bear is a very doable proposition for a canoe.