Neck Turning/ should I /shouldnt I ?????????

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by lerch, Jan 10, 2006.

  1. lerch

    lerch <strong>SPONSOR</strong>

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    I am wondering if I would see any accuracy improvment in my 25-06 and other guns if I decided to start turning necks?? To be fair I am getting good accuracy so far but I just cant let a good thing rest.

    What does neck turning involve, cost, is it a pain in the ass, etc??????

    just looking for general info

    thanks
    steve
     

  2. green 788

    green 788 Well-Known Member

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    THIS GUY... doesn't bother turning necks. So I think it's safe to say we don't need to. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    Dan
     

  3. arthurj

    arthurj Well-Known Member

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    Lerch, isn't your 25-06 a factory chamber? Last year I decided I wanted to try to turn necks for my factory 308. Despite many, more experienced shooters, advice not to do it for a factory chamber, my hard-headed a$$ decided I was still going to give it a try. It actually opened my groups up! I guess I just created way to much clearance. After that experience I will never bother to turn for factory chamber.
     
  4. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Depends on how anal you are. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    During my benchrest shooting days w/factory REM 40X or custom chambers whether tight or not, I turned the necks. It was after a pretty lengthy sorting process. Only turned the ones that made the final cut. The rest were relagated to the hunting rifle.

    Did it make a difference. I think it prevented that occassional flyer. Won my share of matches. However, reading wind and mirage was the key and by far out weighed any neck turning gains.

    Just carried the habit over to the hunting rifle for a while. I don't do it any more though the chamber isn't factory but is standard.

    Am doing some tests at the moment w/a 338 Win factory. Just dinking around trying to get the SD down a bit. Things are pretty good for straight, 0.003 max but SDs are a bit high. Am missing my steel yote at 740 way too often even though the 200 groups are in the 5s. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/frown.gif

    Heck, just try it and see. It's no hassle, and reasonable cost but I wouldn't spend the $ unless I was going to do it. more than once.

    What may be better is a Wilson inside neck reamer. I use one quite often. Seems as though w/high pressure loads, the brass flows forward.
     
  5. dwm

    dwm Well-Known Member

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    I recommend that if you turn the necks for a factory chambered rifle that you do not resize the whole neck on future reloads. Leave about 1/4 or so of the neck unsized. The unsized part of the neck will center the neck of the case in the chamber and hold it there, thereby aligning it with the bore and providing better accuracy.
     
  6. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    About nine months ago I started neck turning. It is easy to do and I do it while watching TV. It is probably a skill worth acquiring.

    I ruined some brass by turning the neck too much. In three different hunting rifles I did not see any improvement. Perhaps if one can shoot little tiny bughole groups one might see the difference.
    Other thing is that turning Norma brass is kinda stupid for an amatuer. It is already pretty good. Remington brass seems to need it more but the gun that shoots remington brass wouldn't know the difference anyway.

    Neck turning should be done on once fired brass. I used very old brass to learn on and then threw it all away and then turned some new brass.

    I just used the Forster hand turner and would do it while watching NASCAR.

    Am I glad I learned how to do it? Yes. Did it help? no.
     
  7. uncleB

    uncleB Well-Known Member

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    Just to throw in my 2cent's, if you have a factory chamber you may not be doing any good at all neck turning except to just turn off the high side to make the brass more concentric. I have seen some factory chambers as much as .015 bigger than a loaded factory round. neck turning in a senario like this is counterproductive. on the other hand if you have a custom chamber meant for .001-to.003 clearance you can absolutely get better accuracy neck turning.
    UB
     
  8. LB

    LB Well-Known Member

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    I would not bother, unless your necks need a "little" truing up, and you decide to use Wilson type die or equiv. with the proper size bushing. I'd also get the chamber type seater. Otherwise, neck sizing is probably all you need. You are talking about precision loading techniques for a hunting rifle and the law of diminishing returns is in effect.

    Good hunting. LB

    PS, but it would be good practice, for when you have a tight necked rifle that would appreciate your efforts.
     
  9. green 788

    green 788 Well-Known Member

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    "You are talking about precision loading techniques for a hunting rifle and the law of diminishing returns is in effect."

    Just thought I'd get that up in bold type. It deserves to be. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif

    Dan
     
  10. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Writers Guild

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    I disagree. <font color="red"> In long range shooting, the name of the game is eliminate as many variables as possible. </font> It might only make 1% difference, but it just might eliminate a flyer caused by uneven bullet release caused by one side of the neck being thicker. And if that flyer was the one that would have been aimed at a critter....

    I do agree with some other posters here that neck turning (as it is called) may be detrimental to accuracy if you are taking more than just the high side off in a non-tight neck chamber because it will be work hardening your brass more than necessary every time you pull the trigger and every time you size.

    Maybe there should be two terminologies here. Neck turning meaning taking more than .001" off for use in a tight neck chamber

    and

    neck buzzing? meaning to just take off the high side of the brass to provide better neck wall consistency to be used in a regular chamber.

    Just a thought for what it is worth. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif
     
  11. green 788

    green 788 Well-Known Member

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    In the spirit of good conversation, however, we still must explain the success of Richard Schatz, whose story is linked in my first post in this thread. He's a world record holder who does not neck turn.

    Just keepin' the fire poked. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

    Dan
     
  12. lerch

    lerch <strong>SPONSOR</strong>

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    I was hoping to get a response on this one from you GG

    I guess what I am getting after is trying to prep my brass the best as possible. The 25-06 is a savage so I know it wouldnt do much for that but I didnt know if I could practice on it and then use that experince to really spiff up brass for my 270 AM and my future Kirby gun


    Think it would be worth it at all or what????

    thank
    steve
     
  13. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Writers Guild

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    Richard doesn't neck turn for that particular barrel. That is correct. However, he is using Lapua 6br brass in a fully custom rifle chambered for a non-tight neck but it is still very small tolerances I'm sure. In other words, he is using top notch equipment which means his brass probably had very close neck wall thickness right out of the box. Both my lots of 6br brass had less than .001" variance.

    Now, this is one guy with one good group. Now lets look at how many of us buzz our necks compared to the few who don't. It is a high ratio.

    Remember, consistency is the key to accuracy. I wouldn't let one isolated scenario lead me to believe that that is the way it should be done always. FWIW. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif
     
  14. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Writers Guild

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    [ QUOTE ]
    The 25-06 is a savage so I know it wouldnt do much for that

    [/ QUOTE ]


    I wouldn't short change the ol' Savage. It might just shoot even better with a good neck buzz. Often, the Savage rifles have better than average chambers in my experience. And even if it doesn't, giving the high side a shave will always give you more consistent bullet release no matter how sloppy the chamber is.

    And you are right, it will be good practice for your other more "serious" rifles. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif