montana elk hunting

Discussion in 'Elk Hunting' started by Big Jakes, May 1, 2012.

  1. Big Jakes

    Big Jakes Active Member

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    I am a newb to the website but so far I like it. I live in norman oklahoma and I do a little deer hunting. The second week of november I am going to be going on a guided elk hunting trip with my father in law. The hunting will be around missoula.nI just purchased one of the new weatherby vanguard series 2 chambered in .300 win mag. The father in law is bringing a 30-06. I have never been elk hunting does anybody in here have any tips for this kind of hunt? Thanks
     
  2. str8shoot

    str8shoot Well-Known Member

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    Shoot that 300win as much as you can, and be in the best shape you can be in.
     

  3. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Trust your guide, ask him plenty of questions beforehand then do exactly as he advises you. He know the area, the elk and how to get one. Listen to him and don't believe what you see on TV.

    You are in for a great adventure. I wish you the best and have a great hunt.

    Jeff
     
  4. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    Exercise frequently, especially going up and down stairs. The elevation is what will really get you, and there is no substitute for being in good condition. If I'm drawn on May 9 for New Mexico I'll be adding stairs to my regimen later this summer.

    Buy your base, rings and scope now if you don't have them already. Get the rifle set up and start shooting. Practice out to 300 or 400 yards if you can. This will seem like a looong way if you've not done it before. A good rest will help immensely. If you use factory ammo you'll probably have to buy a box of 3 different types and see how they each group at 200 yards, then go with the best one. With some of the better factory loads you can sight in at 250 yards and be within 3 inches above or below your line of sight out to 300. That means that anything between you and 300 is just aim and shoot. :D

    If you own a bipod, get used to using one. Also look into other types of portable rests such as monopods or similar that you can easily carry.

    Buy the best binoculars you can afford. I'd rather take a $200 scope and expensive binoculars than a $1000 scope and cheap binos. Yes, there is a definite difference between $400 Leupolds, $1200 Zeiss and $2000 Swarovski binoculars (though the $1200 Zeiss is very nice).

    Find a nice daypack style backpack that you can use to carry your stuff such as inflatable seat cushion, spare ammo, binocs, flashlight, knife, etc.

    Wear no cotton.

    Send me your e-mail address and I'll send you my packing list if that would help.
     
  5. Big Jakes

    Big Jakes Active Member

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    Apr 22, 2012
    Thank you for the replies. Dr. Vette was especially helpful. I shot the weatherby for the first time last weekend without a bipod to get it sighted in. I have a nikon monarch 4.5-14 mounted with talley rings It shot very well I was happy. I shot out of a lead sled. Today I received my 13-23'' bipod. It fits me well prone and sitting down. As long as my plans hold together I should be shooting this weekend. Do any of you guys hunt with muzzle breaks I know they are loud but I understand them to be effective. I am looking at the que adjustable on brownells. That particular one because I am not a reloader and it offers a "tuning" of the barrel. Thoughts?
     
  6. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    I'd go for a side discharge brake given the option. You use a fully ported brake once in the sand and you'll know what I mean. Look at the Muscle Brake or Darrell Holland's side discharge brake.

    Holland's Gunsmithing & Shooters Supply

    Center Shot Rifles - Products / Sales - Muzzle Brakes

    I think that Jim has a slightly smaller diameter Muscle Brake coming out soon.
    The BOSS system as shown in the Que brake can be a real PITA to tune. And, it's ported all the way around.

    Add the Painkiller brake to your list as well:
    Painkiller Muzzle Brakes
     
  7. MHO

    MHO Well-Known Member

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    Shoot as much as possible and be in the best shape you can. Buy the best boots that you can afford. But first and foremost be in shape. The mountains are wonderful but unforgiving. You will have a great time.
     
  8. Catahoula

    Catahoula Well-Known Member

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    Bring plenty of hankies to dry your eyes when you are seeing more wolf tracks than elk tracks. Elk herds are really down.
    Kirk
     
  9. mtelkhntr78

    mtelkhntr78 Well-Known Member

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    Couldnt agree more. We tend to give rifles a ton of emphasis on this website but with out a good pair of boots and being in shape the rest doesnt matter.
    Have fun!
     
  10. DanMan

    DanMan Well-Known Member

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    Getting in shape for climbing the hills is top advice. +1 on having top hiking boots. Are you talking about a back country horse back hunt or day hunts? also early or late season? Some of that country west of Missoula is thicker than dog hair so be prepared for a close shot also if your headed that direction.:)
     
  11. Big Jakes

    Big Jakes Active Member

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    Yea there is always that chance we see nothing. We bought the big game combo so we have chances on deer and upland bird as well.

    We are going on day hunts. I already have some boots but I am considering getting some boots make by muck. They are waterproof and very comfortable.

    I have my rifle zeroed at 250 yards.
     
  12. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    See if your outfitter will let you hunt any doe, and if so look into an antlerless deer permit. We picked up a doe each for the cost of the state licence with minimal effort.
     
  13. minute of elk

    minute of elk Well-Known Member

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    i'm listing these in order of importance for me-

    1) put 50# into a pack & hike up and down stairs for 30 minutes a few times a week. i killed the bull below about a mile right of the high point at the upper right of this pic (a mere 5 miles from the truck). the pack out was brutal (but they all are)

    [​IMG]

    2) be prepared to take shots at 400-500 yards- even though you're much more likely to get a close shot over there, the confidence will be invaluable.

    i spotted this guy at 800+ yds, but he headed for the trees right after. i was able to get inside 100 in heavy timber before i saw him (bedded). i had been shooting targets at 400 a few days before, so i didn't even have to think about the shot. btw- there was over 8" of snow on the ground 24 hours after this picture was taken.

    [​IMG]

    3) Schnees pack boots- for hiking in mixed terrain & variable conditions there's no better choice (they're comfy & warm as heck, too). this pic was taken a week into rifle season.

    [​IMG]

    4) practice ranging random things at all distances within your comfort zone- and getting your crosshairs on them! elk don't typically give you long to take the shot, so you need to have your LRF dialed & be quick with your rifle (he who hesitates ends up with tag soup). this joker gave me just enough time to get one picture before he bolted into the trees...i had the camera ready- not the gun)

    [​IMG]

    5) find out where you're going to be hunting & spend some time getting to know it on google earth