LRH Technology beyond LRF......

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by royinidaho, Apr 1, 2006.

  1. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Idaho's seasons are posted. Deer opens a week ahead of elk thus its gonna be one morning to get a LR deer and months of attempting to get a cow.

    Here's the deer area. Guaranteed a shot for the two of us. Nothing big, just a potential long shot. (Last season the kid missed at 110yds /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/crazy.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/frown.gif)

    With the georeferenced information now available, its possible to measure ranges with a gps receiver, and laptop and geographical information system (GIS) software and the proper data file. Then NRCS/FSA now has all counties of pretty much the entire northwest available. They are quite large. ~220MB is typical.

    With a decent GPS, accuracy is, in my experience about 1.5 feet which beats any LRF and distance is unlimited with the GIS. I use MapInfo.

    The image shows the spots were we scouted shootable bucks prior to last season. Opening morning though, nothing worked out. Its an open hunt and the locals hit it pretty hard, though there where only 6 hunters on the hill with one guy walking with his two pre-hunting age kids. Thus the 110 yd shot at bambi's little brother......

    Point A is lower than Point B and all shots from it to the north and east are pretty much flat. From point B to the north its pretty much level also. To the south and southeast the multiplier is about 0.94

    If there are some that carry a 100# bench and a Russian range finder, heck, a decent battery, laptop, gps and a hood to be able to see the screen wouldn't be all that bad.

    The objective this year is for both out us to spend the night at Point B and shoot the sucker out of the bed roll. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/ooo.gif
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  2. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    Google Earth is pretty good. One of the problems with this type of technology is actually being able to see from the shooting point. Last year I checked maybe 30 different "potential" shooting areas and maybe three actally were usable. Most of them had too much vegetation. Other point to consider is the sun angle so you are not shooting into the setting or riseing sun. Defilade has to be considered also. I think you can rotate the view and check that.


    For more conventional technology the University of Texas has a lot of maps computerized such as the BLM land ownership maps

    maps
     

  3. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Defilade? OK I'll bite. What's that?

    Regarding too much vegatation. No such problem out this way.

    Additionally these images pixelate too soon. If I'm really interested in an area I take an aerial image then georeference it. When I do it myself, pixel width is about 1.5 feet.

    When shooting in close proximity of he vehicle it works pretty very well.
     
  4. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    Defilade is the area in the “shadow" of a hill that you cannot get a bullet to. It is also the back side of a ridge. You will be only be able to see and hit things on the front side of the ridge. When you are in the Fire Direction Center of an artillery unit you have to know when to use high angle fire to lob them in over a mountain or ridgeline like a mortar and when to use regular angle fire. If you are in the infantry and they tell you that it will be high angle fire you pretty much have to decide whether you want to die by enemy fire or friendly fire because the stuff is really inaccurate

    In the picture you used there are two ridges that “may” be in the way of the bullets. I have marked them in yellow. The “protected shadow area" I have circled in blue. You will need to check the elevation of the shooting position, the elevation of the ridges and the elevation of the target and see if you have line of sight. Graph paper and a ruler is the way I know how to do it but I am sure there is a way to do it one the computer and I think it has something to do with “view” and “rotate”.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    It may be that what I am interpreting as a ridge in the middle of the photo is really a stream. It is really hard to tell and I may be too used to looking at eastern topography.