Long Range Hunter

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by Brambles, Jan 11, 2009.

  1. Brambles

    Brambles Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    158
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2008
    I'm interested in doing some long range shooting, and perhaps after getting proficient, looking at possibly taking game at longish ranges.

    Starting platform is a Remington BDL SS 300 ultra mag, Leupold VXIII 4.5-14x40, harris bipod.

    I have to pack this thing in the mountains so I don't want to go goofy on the weight. I have a few lightweight rifles for long distance backpacking, this new build will likely involve shorter hike in trips, probably within 2 hours of the trailhead.

    I had to pass up a 195" mule deer this year because I couldn't get close enough for a shot. In the future, given adequate time and conditions I would like to be able to make that shot. With plenty of practice first of course...

    What would you do to the rifle first, it shoots half decent with 95 gr of Retumbo pushing a 200 gr accubond @ 3208 fps.

    Part of me is thinking of just sending it away to get the action trued and accurized, chamber cleaned up and barrel re crowned and see what that does for accuracy, but the other part of me says just rebarrel the damn thing and stop pissing around. Whatcha figure?

    Are sporter stocks adequate for consistant "in the field" long range shooting or does a guy really need to upgrade to a tac style stock? I have a Bansner Hi-Tech sporter stock I can throw on it as long as I don't go larger on the barrel channel, don't really want to hogg out the stock as I can use it on my other lightweight rigs if all else fails.

    I'd be happy with a 700-800 yard gun, don't really think I want to be shooting 1000 yards.

    Thanks for any help

    Brambles
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2009
  2. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

    Messages:
    5,085
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2001
    It is unclear what that means.


    If we say a mule deer has a 15 inch kill zone then a rifle that will stay at 1 inch at 100 yards should be adequate to kill a deer at 1000 yards accuracy wise. However, if the rifle will only shoot 2 inch groups at 100 yards then the effective range starts to drop down to 750 yards. Wind, mirage, range error, poor shooting technique all must be considered.

    So, the standard places to start with a rifle is to bed the action and adjust the trigger to about 2-3 pounds. If you need a gunsmiths to adjust the trigger then have him check the rifle over to see what he thinks about the action. Let him borescope the barrel and maybe while he is at it redo the crown.

    Take a piece of fired brass and roll it across a flat table top and see it it is relatively uniform or is it is bumping and out of round. This will tell you something about the chamber.

    There is a thread called something like "When do you stop cleaning your Rifle". Read what Boss Hoss said and do what he said.

    Get a concentricity gauge and check your reloading process to see how good your ammo is. Buy good brass.

    You will also need to do the same things to your practice rifle.
     

  3. Brambles

    Brambles Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    158
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2008
    The rifle shoots approx .75" groups @ 100 with the current load. Some loads shoot better but with reduced velocity
     
  4. Varmint Hunter

    Varmint Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,522
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2001
    On the minimal side: Bedding and a good trigger job can only help and has never hurt the accuracy of any rifle. Touching up the crown is an inexpensive way to avoid any problem (@ the crown) that the factory may have caused when making the mass produced bbl.

    Second to that I'd consider also having the action blueprinted by a competent gunsmith.

    If you have the cash then I'd add a custom match barrel and heavy machined recoil lug to the items mentioned above.

    Personally, it has been my experience that you will be best served by having any or all the work done by the same gunsmith. Each smith does things his own way and prefers materials from sources that have produced accurate rifles for him. No smith really wants to pick-up where another smith has left off and has possibly done things in a manner that he doesn't agree with.

    Here's another reason to stick with one gunsmith - If smith "A" does the bedding, and later on you switch to smith "B" who does the blueprinting and ultimately you have smith "C" install a match barrel; who do you go to if the rifle doesn't shoot up to your expectations?

    Do it all once and be done with it. The satisfaction that an accurate rifle brings will make the sting go away fast. :>)
     
  5. Rimfire

    Rimfire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    479
    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    .75" consistently ? LTFTALONE!!!

    Trigger and bedding are a good idea and have the crown checked other than that leave it alone and go shooting.

    If you want custom go custom dont go half way. You cant blueprint an action without a barrel in a sporter weight. After the threads are cut 10 over there's not enough shank on the sporter barrel to do a quality set back and rechamber . And you might be throwing money away betting on a factory barrel.

    .75 is more than acceptable for 800yards with the right driver. Shoot it out to 800 and see if the load / you hold together before touching it.

    By the time you're comfortable at 800 you might be ready for a new barrel, so waste the factory tube on practice.
     
  6. Brambles

    Brambles Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    158
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2008
    So what about Stocks? Its just go the factroy tupperware BDL stock right now, I do my own synthetic restocking and bedding so the cost is only a decent blank, do tac style stocks really make that much difference in shooting more consistant or would the bansner Hi-tech classic stock work just fine?

    Never shot a rifle with a tac style stock.
     
  7. Rimfire

    Rimfire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    479
    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007

    The factory tupperware can cause hell on cosisteny. I don't know anything about the Bansner, If it is stiff and comfortable I would use it. You don't need a tactical stock, just decent quality. Tactical stocks often
     
  8. Brambles

    Brambles Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    158
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2008
    Another question is regarding the scope, I have intentions of sending it to Leupold to get some turrets installed.

    I'm wondering if the Leupold VXIII 4.4-14x40 1" tube has enough elevation adjustment so I can just use Talley one piece rings and bases or If I have to go with a special MOA base to get the adjustment for 800 yard shooting?
     
  9. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

    Messages:
    5,085
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2001
    Go to this website and run your ballistics. Enter however your scope is set up now for zero. Find out how much your drop will be for whatever the max distance is that you plan on shooting.

    JBM - Calculations - Trajectory

    Take your scope and spin the dial to get the amount of drops for whatever your longest distance will be. If you can dial it in then you are good to go. You should have a few MOA of buffer so you are not right up against the end of adjustment. If you hit the end of adjustment before you get your drop dialed then you need a slanted base or to shim your current base or to get Burris Signature rings with the MOA inserts.