How to build switch-barrel savage?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by Dgutter, Feb 28, 2012.

  1. Dgutter

    Dgutter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    59
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    I have a savage 111 topped with decent glass and would like to get another barrel to make it a switch barrel rifle. I'd like to get a 30" 338 Edge barrel + Muscle Brake. What all does it entail to have the barrel threaded and muzzle brake "timed"? I'm probably going to have a smith do the work, would just like to know if I'll have to send the action in or not. Also, how hard is it to swap the bolt head and is there some initial fitting involved or is it a drop-in part? How long would you say it would take to swap a barrel and bolt head from one configuration to the next? Would I be better off using a separate bolt and swapping bolt and barrel? Thanks for any help!
     

  2. MNbogboy

    MNbogboy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    236
    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2009
    As far as two of your questions go;

    1) It takes me about twenty minutes or so to switch barrels using the conventional barrel nut tools and go/no go gauges...Keep track of your scope settings for each caliber and the sight in will probably be only one confirmation shot (depending on your mounts).

    If your smith sets you up with a "nutless" system you probably can shave another 5 minutes or so off the switch time....

    2) If your barrel switch requires two different bolt heads my advice is to have two separate bolts....I have one for my small rifles barrels (.221, .223) and another for my 25-06, 30-06 and .260 barrels....

    Switching bolt heads only will take more time, (especially if you have to adjust the firing pin protrusion)...If I were you I would pay approximately $75 more (over the cost of just a bolt head) for a complete bolt rather than switching the heads each time....Midway has them for about $100 wait till they have their promotional sale towards the end of each month and save another 10%...

    These Savage switches become addictive but it sure is fun...

    Good luck,
    Randy
     

  3. Dgutter

    Dgutter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    59
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Thanks for the info! So I went shopping for a new bolt and ran into what may be a bit of an issue...I'm left-handed (and so is my rifle) and I'm wanting to build a 338 Edge (338-300 RUM). I can't seem to find a Left Handed RUM bolt assembly. They have them in right hand. and they have other left hand bolts available. Do they make such a critter?
    Also, all of those bolts are without ejector...does the extractor do a good enough job of "ejecting" the case?
     
  4. geargrinder

    geargrinder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,972
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    You don't want a RUM bolt. Those are CRF and won't work in a non-CRF action.

    All you need is a magnum bolt head or bolt.

    To get your brake timed correctly you can install your barrel with the correct headspace, mark the top of your barrel, and send it to have the brake installed.

    I'd recommend Ross Schuler. He does great work and his prices can't be beat.

    Timing your brake any other way will require you to send the barreled action in to a smith to have it done.
     
  5. frankidaho

    frankidaho Active Member

    Messages:
    25
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2010
  6. Dgutter

    Dgutter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    59
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    I'm sorry can you explain what you mean by CRF?

    Thank you all for the suggestions, insight, and help thus far. I really appreciate all of your guys' comments.
     
  7. nfhjr62

    nfhjr62 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    404
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2008
  8. Dgutter

    Dgutter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    59
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Great articles guys! Keep the info coming!
     
  9. curtis

    curtis Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    189
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2005
    Here is a question I have about building a switch-barrel Savage. If I have a .25-06 barrel and a .300 WM barrel and I am going to glass bed my stock....does it make a difference which barrel I have installed when I glass bed the stock?
     
  10. geargrinder

    geargrinder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,972
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    No, so long as you only bed up to the rear face of the recoil lug and the heavier of the two barrels is free floading.
     
  11. geargrinder

    geargrinder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,972
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    The RUM and WSM actions used CRF bolt heads with standing ejectors. CRF stands for controlled round feed. The bottom of the bolt snout was machined flush with the bolt face. The bolt head ejector was removed and the action was slotted for a standing ejector held in by the trigger retaining pin. It helped the feeding of the fatter rounds in the older stagger feed actions.

    Your action is not slotted for the standing ejector. I doesn't need to be. All you need is a magnum bolt head or a complete bolt from a LH 7mm or 300wm.
     
  12. Dgutter

    Dgutter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    59
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Awesome, thats good to know. And good question curtis.
     
  13. TrophyHunter_colorado

    TrophyHunter_colorado Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    581
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    I should just read the article on switch barrels but i am trying to cheat here. How do you take your barrel off with barrel nut wrench with your scope on? I have always taken my scope off, but maybe you know some cool tricks. I am getting my Lilja 338 edge barrel in with the KDF brake to go on my savage 112, cant wait!
     
  14. geargrinder

    geargrinder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,972
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    You have to modify the wrench.

    Basically just cut the end off. I think if you plan carefully, you only lose 1 slot of engagement.

    I have two nut wrenches. One that I've left alone for factory tight, and another that I've modified this way to keep the scopes on.

    I wouldn't use a modified one on a factory tight nut.