Gunsmithing schools............

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by mindcrime, Jan 31, 2011.

  1. mindcrime

    mindcrime Well-Known Member

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    I did a search for gunsmithing schools, and found that most are online. I do have SEVERAL of the American Gunsmithing Institute's videos---great vids, especially those by Darrel Holland, HOWEVER I want lathe time and REAL-LIFE experience.

    Can my friends here supply links to real to life IN PERSON gunsmithing schools?!? THANKS in advance!

    And YES, if the school seems good enough, I am willing to move---I'm 38, no kids, and the girlfriend will just have to deal with my passion, or dump me, THAT'S HOW IMPORTANT THIS IS TO ME. So, basically nothing but money to hold me back---but is that just about all of us! ;^)
     
  2. mindcrime

    mindcrime Well-Known Member

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    Oh yeah, one more thing. I have had one semester of machine shop while majoring in Industry Technology in college, so I DO have "some" real lathe-time, just not like what I am wanting.

    I want to be a Kirby or a Shawn! ;^)
     

  3. mindcrime

    mindcrime Well-Known Member

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    Oops, 3 1/2 total years in college, never to find my calling. Anytime that someone has gunsmithing work at my current employer that does not require a mill or lathe, comes straight to me.....I have a small, but very good rep.

    THANKS!!!!!!
     
  4. dirtball

    dirtball Well-Known Member

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    Ran across this the other day, it is for short term courses, but gives you 4 places to call and ask questions.

    Dave


    NRA Gunsmithing Schools
     
  5. Coyboy

    Coyboy Well-Known Member

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    Spend a month in Trinidad, they have great instructors. I think Speedy has been upgrading the equipment so that should be helping a bit. As of 3 years ago they could really use some newer lathes.

    You can stay in the dorms and live pretty cheap while your there. Bring lots of guns to work on and shoot. NRA Whiting center is less than an hour away.
    The summer nra classes will get your feet wet and help you make the jump if you so choose.
     
  6. mindcrime

    mindcrime Well-Known Member

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    I looked at that link, but thanks for posting it again. I'm trying to decide whether to get my "General" Machining Certificate, and THEN attend a few NRA classes?!? Any opinions Mr. See?
     
  7. mindcrime

    mindcrime Well-Known Member

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    I wish Trinidad was closer. :^O I was looking at the one in Norf Karoliner.
     
  8. Coyboy

    Coyboy Well-Known Member

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    Well a tech course would be a good plan. Take the first semester courses, all of them. If your driven you will finish your required work and have time to make fixtures during the shop lab. When I went thru we spent 20 hours a week in the shop and I finished the required ciriculum in 8 weeks. the next 8 weeks the instructors let me make whatever I wanted, and if there was a machine I needed to use for a certain machining operation they took the time to give me a run thru on it. I would meet with an instructor before enrolling and get his feel for the attitude of the dept. when it comes to stuff like this.
    I was lucky 3 of the 4 head instructors worked at one time in the arms and amunitions manf.

    Doing this will put you way ahead on the gunsmithing courses as less time will be devoted to becoming proficent at running the machines.

    and learning good basic machining practices carries over into all of rifle building.
     
  9. TAP

    TAP Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Coyboy. Get some machining knowledge/skills under your belt first. I am in my last semester at Yavapai, taking their gunsmithing course. They have topnotch instructors. I have almost 17yrs machining experience, and things have been a lot easier on me than some. Not only do I go to school full time, but I work 10-12 hrs a day. Having the machining background buys me time because I can get through the projects faster than some. This semester I am building a takedown mauser, action and all. I wouldn't even have attempted it without my background. Good luck.
     
  10. Rustystud

    Rustystud Well-Known Member

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    I taught a class at Trinidad State Junior College (NRA Short Course) last summer. I met Keith Gipson the head instructor, Dave Nolan, Speedy Gonzales and others. The school has been set up for traditional gunsmithing for many years. The staff and facility are first class. The new third year program gives the students a real time experience in gunshop operation. It is both gunsmithing and business.

    I have an assorted education not related to gunsmithing but advanced degrees Criminal Justice and Accounting. I had 40 plus years of machining and welding experience before getting a degree in machine science. My degree was directed more to CNC machining. I consider myself more as a machinist than gunsmith.

    I felt that Trinidad State Junior College gave its' student the basic knowledge to get them started. It teaches them were to look if the student does not have the experience or training. That is what all good schools do.

    Nat Lambeth