getting started

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Dead Beat, Mar 3, 2006.

  1. Dead Beat

    Dead Beat Well-Known Member

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    ok i have been thinking of getting into reloading what would be a ball park $ figure to get started are there any good books with info on getting started is there a package deal ? some were thanks
     
  2. lovdasnow

    lovdasnow Well-Known Member

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    Nov 13, 2005
    prices can vary depending on what you get, but you can buy one of the reloading kits in the $250-350 range. but then there are powders, primers, dyes, bullets, calipers, misc tools, manuals, etc, etc....

    I just started a couple months ago, and had the rockchucker kit from RCBS, but ended up selling everything but the press, and got the chargemaster powder measure combo.

    It's fun, but if you are doing it just to save money, it takes a little while to break even. It's a fun part of the hobby, I like to tinker though....

    good luck, check out ebay, there is a ton of good used reloading equipment on there.
     

  3. green 788

    green 788 Well-Known Member

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  4. Dead Beat

    Dead Beat Well-Known Member

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    im looking at it as more of whole part of hunting and shooting experience. not really the money part. i like to learn new thing's. i just dont want to buy something and then outgrow it in 6 months . i plan on doing this for awhile
     
  5. 41mag

    41mag Well-Known Member

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    Well, Green has it down pretty much to a shopping list there.

    My .02 are as follows,

    Depending on availability in the caliber, you might look into the Lee Collet dies. They have been reported here to produce quality ammo and they are very reasonable. Other than these I have had good luck using the Hornady Custom Grade New Dimension dies, as well as other name brands. The Hornady dies can also be upgraded cheaply and easily with a calibrated seating stem which has worked well for me and a couple of friends.

    A good scale is obvious, and as mentioned the beam scales are easier to keep accurate and consistant.

    To this, I would also look into something like the Uni-Flow from RCBS or similar. Personally, I use this verses weighing out each individual charge more often than not. It only takes a little time with these type measures to get a constant charge, and they will handle most powders reasonably well.

    for what your looking at one of the Kits you mentioned would have everything to start you off just fine. As for the Ebay deals, yes you can find them, just be sure you think about the shipping on a press when making that great deal. I got one of the Reloader Special presses, for a great deal, till I found out that the shipping was more than the price I won it for. LOL

    For seating primers, it's hard to beat the hand prime units as mentioned. Which one is best? I guess it depends on the person squeezing the handle. I use the Lee, as it affords quick changing of calibers with the set of case holders which can be had for about $12. The one I have has worked flawlessly for over 10 years and loaded thousands of rounds.

    I have several of just about all of it. Of course, I also take stuff on the road with me to do load development in the field. THis is where the PArdner presses, hand primer, and Uni-flow really shine. I have a 3/8" x 4" flat bar about 14" long which will C-clamp onto just about anything. It has drilled and tapped holes to allow for the press to be mounted as well as the Uni-flow. Takes about 3 minutes to be set up and ready to load. Takes a little time at the house to weigh out the different charge weights on a scale and record the setting on the stem of the uni-flow, then your set to go. Set it at the lower end and increase by incremental turns of the stem. Load three or five rounds and shoot.

    For sizing lube, I asked several months ago about the most preferred and Imperial Sizing Wax was the most recommended. I picked up some and it is great stuff. Just a little on your fingers and rub the cases as you size them. Takes a time or two to get the amount right but once you got it things go fast.

    One last thing, be sure to get a stuck case extractor. You might not need it for three or four years, but eventually, it's going to happen. A case stuck in your sizing die shuts you down now and they just don't pop right out.

    Good luck in your decisions, and I hope that you find reloading to be as much fun and rewarding as I have. There is something special about producing your first sub-MOA group with your loads as well as taking your first game with them.
     
  6. Dead Beat

    Dead Beat Well-Known Member

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    Green outstanding info!! mike your last paragraph say it better than i could!! thanks alot guys