Front focal or not??? New Vortex...

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by Dust270WSM, Nov 29, 2011.

  1. Dust270WSM

    Dust270WSM Well-Known Member

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    I'm fixin to buy a new Vortex PST and wanted to know if I need a front focal or not. I'm going to use this for hunting white tails and shooting steel. What y'all think is it worth it or is the rear focal better for hunting???
     
  2. kcebcj

    kcebcj Well-Known Member

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    If you're going to use the reticle for ranging or hold over's the FFP would be the better choice as you could do those things throughout the power range. If you're going to use it as a regular scope or dial the come ups the SFP would work fine. You can still range and hold over with a second focal plane scope. The marks are correct at full power and on other powers if you do the math. Read the product manual on thier website lots of info.


    If you can look through both it will help with the decision.
     

  3. Loner

    Loner Well-Known Member

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    SFP scopes hold no value to me anymore. The reticles in a FFP typically are 2" @ 1000
    yards on full power so the old argument of them covering the target doesn't wash with
    me. FFP is a sturdier way to build a scope, the reason for the Europeans building them
    that way for 60 or 70 years. And for ranging they are a must. To have to change power
    or check it to range is a missed shot waiting to happen. Your rangefinder has already
    failed for cold or snow, so in the heat of the battle you are supposed to run through a
    checklist? Not for me.
     
  4. Dust270WSM

    Dust270WSM Well-Known Member

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    Yea plan on using the turrets to adjust and probably gettin a custom turret.
     
  5. Scot E

    Scot E Well-Known Member

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    +1
    I have got to agree with Loner. Now that I have gone FFP I can hardly remember what took me so long to make the change! :) A few years ago the FFP reticles were pretty thick and this could be a turnoff to some but anymore manufacturers have this all figured out.

    The one bit of misinformation you often hear about FFP is that the reticle gets too thick at the higher powers but this isn't true (unless the shooter thinks it is too thick at the lower magnification settings). The relationship between the reticle and the target stays the same at all powers so the reticle is the same thickness in relation to the target.

    I think the only situation I would think about SFP would maybe be a dedicated LR varmint gun for prairie dogs and rock chucks. Even then some of the new FFP reticles would be more than adequate.

    HTH,

    Scot E.
     
  6. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    I only use SFP scopes. The ranging with the reticle simply leaves to much error in the equation for my needs. Plus I prefer the target getting larger and the cross hairs staying smaller for a more precise point of aim as I increase the power.

    That said I tend to shoot longer distances than the normal LR shooter / hunter. So if you are only going to shoot to 700 yards or so you may have a different opinion.

    I do not do holdover nor do I hold for wind. I choose to dial both elevation and windage and for this the SFP is far superior in my opinion.

    Jeff
     
  7. D.ID

    D.ID Well-Known Member

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    For holdover or ranging the ffp looks like it would simplify. I looked at a ffp 6x24x50 pst recently and think it's my next one.
     
  8. Clark

    Clark Well-Known Member

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    I have two IOR 2.5x10, one is FFP, one is SFP.

    The FFP is useless on 2.5X, as the reticule almost disappears.
    So it is like a fixed 10X scope.

    The SFP scope get used.
     
  9. Silverback7

    Silverback7 Well-Known Member

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    I gotta say FFP would be the most logical choice for target and long range but sfp for general hunting.
     
  10. Scot E

    Scot E Well-Known Member

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    Ya, I seldom shoot past 1/2 mile for hunting so I can see that making a difference. I don't range with mine but have been spending some time getting familiar with holdover with the reticle and it really is something I could get used to. It is a lot different than dialing everything, which is what I am used to, but the concept of not having to worry about turret error and repeatability makes it interesting to me. I think in some ways I am shooting better groups now, compared to when I dial, but I am still a bit inconsistent with holding off when I am in between hash marks. I know I am faster though. With some more work I may try to make the change completely on one of my guns and really put it to the test. More to work on!

    Broz, I have enjoyed your write-ups lately! Thanks for taking the time and sharing those!
     
  11. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Valid point. I do all the tests to have full confidence in my scope returning to zero every time, and also that it tracks dead on. The Nightforce NXS's I hunt with have been good to me in that aspect and I trust them completely.

    I started the longer pokes years ago with hold over reticles. I just never liked it and felt it limited me. I could not get a good feel about holding between marks for a point of aim. I teach and practice aiming at a small point of impacts, whether it is a target or game. This is probably why I am more comfortable with SFP , large magnified targets and small , fine crosshairs. On my wifes elk at 816 yrds this year I had her aim at a ruffled spot of hair in the crease behind the shoulder, golf ball size. It worked perfectly. Hard to do that with hold over. For me anyway.

    Glad you enjoyed the posts from my season. It has been a very good one. The freezers are full and I was able to take a first year boy and get his elk and also a disabled neighbor for a nice fat cow. The neighbor was amazed at how far he shot. Only 521 yards, but DRT and he seen the 210 Berger hit, and the cow drop through the scope. He was stoked!!

    Threads like this open good discussion up for many senarios. Definatly method of use, method of ranging and distance of shots are key to the decision. Not to mention terrain.

    Jeff
     
  12. joseph

    joseph Well-Known Member

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  13. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    What do you do when you make a large change in altitude or temperature? Do you have several turrets? Or do you limit your shooting to 600 yards?

    Jeff
     
  14. Loner

    Loner Well-Known Member

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    Broz you weren't huntin them on the elk farm out of town on the way to White Sulfur
    were you? (haha) . A buddy of mine lived on 20 on the hillside just up from the elk farm.
    Used to get our blood boiling for opening day.