Factory Stocks

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by Tim Behle, Jan 4, 2003.

  1. Tim Behle

    Tim Behle Well-Known Member

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    I guess you could say today was a pretty good day. In a frustrating sort of way. I got up first thing this morning, with every intention of going out to kill a coyote or two. But despite the best of intentions, My body refused to cooperate, and 15 minutes later I crawled back in bed. I still made it up before sunrise, with a new plan for the day in mind.

    I'd bought a pound of Retumbo a few months back, and had a box of 175 Grain Gamekings in 7 MM sitting on the shelf. So I started working on some load development, and as much as the kids hated me for doing so, I was shooting a good 15 minutes before the Sun made an appearance.

    I shot, then loaded up three more rounds and tried again. I made that box of bullets last until late Afternoon. But no matter what the load, or seating depth I tried, I never did break less than 1" at 100 yards. I even broke down and cleaned the barrel. No difference. 1.1" was my best 3 shot group. This same rifle shoots the Berger 180 Grain bullets at less than 3/4" anytime I'm willing.

    The powder seemed to burn nicely, I ended up with a SD of 7.97 for the last 25-30 rounds. Norma Brass, all partially sized with a Full length size die. Fed 215 primers.

    The rifle is pretty much factory stock. It's a Winchester Model 70 classic In 7 MM Remington Magnum. My intentions are to get the action trued up, Lugs lapped etc., and have been holding off doing this work, to also have the stock pillar bedded.

    Is this Factory synthetic stock worth the cost of being bedded? Or should I just hold off, buy a new stock, then have all of the work done at once?
     
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  3. Tim Behle

    Tim Behle Well-Known Member

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    I like to shoot this rifle out to 1,000 yards. If I ever get around to buying a new computer, I might be tempted to buy new ballistics software. I use Point Blank now, it limits me to 1,000 yards. Mostly I just target shoot with it, but I may take it bear hunting again next fall. I got drawn for a Javalina hunt next month and I am thinking I'd like to take one of those at 6-700 yards on one of the local irrigation circles.

    I think the stock is injection molded, I can't tell for sure. It definitely is not as stiff in the forend as I would like it to be.
    I do want to put a new stock on it, but Santa demands payment first. It may take a few months before I can replenish my gun fund. But in the mean time, I could probably afford to have this stock bedded. If it was thought to be worth the effort.

    I got a reprieve from the Honey-do list this afternoon, and decided I may as well finish off the last of the Retumbo. I had 5 pieces of brass left sitting in the block from yesterday. So I dumped the charges in, didn't trickle any of them. Seated the some Nosler 175 partitions in at the last seating depth I used yesterday. Set up the Chrono, and proceeded to shoot.

    The third shot was a flyer, I called it. But the other 4 hit .845 top to bottom, and .286 side to side.

    Speed today was around 2870, compared to 2828 ave. yesterday. The SD looks to be easily in the single digits also.

    I may have just found a new favorite bullet!
     
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  5. Brent

    Brent Well-Known Member

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    Hey Tim, have you ever bedded a rifle yourself yet?
    I watched my father do his for the first time last week. It was not that difficult at all to say the least.
    If you havn't yet, I'm sure the help if you need it along the way is ready and willing by folks right here.
    Good stock to try your hand at it with, if you havn't already.
    If it's like the ones I've had, you can ONLY make it better doing it. [​IMG]
     
  6. Tim Behle

    Tim Behle Well-Known Member

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    A friend from Ohio, who has bedded quite a few rifles is to be out in a couple of weeks. He just called and volunteered to show me how to bed them.

    I'll go that route while I start saving for a new stock in a couple of months. Of course, there's no sense in adding a new stock to a rifle with an untrued action..... And have you seen those new Barrels Dan Lilja makes....

    Thanks Len, You created a board so good, I may never be able to afford to retire!

    Tim
     
  7. Brent

    Brent Well-Known Member

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    New Lilja barrels?
     
  8. Mysticplayer

    Mysticplayer Writers Guild

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    Tim,

    Bed that action from 1" in front of the receiver ring to the rear of the action. Devcon Epoxy steel in the twin syringe is excellent. Injection molded stocks provide a drop in fit. There is usually lots of slop and that is passed to the action screws - not good.

    If you notice any "squishing" when you tighten your stock after bedding, you will need to pillar bed as well. A well bedded stock will need firm pressure to get the stock and action together. When tightening the action screws, the bolts will go tight in a 1/4 turn of the screwdriver. No mushy or increasing tightness should be felt. The action should also not move or bend during tightening or loosening. Firm hand pressure is all that is needed to tighten the action screws. No he-man strength needed.

    Free float that barrel and make sure that there is plenty of space between the stock and barrel. The stock must not be able to touch the barrel even when squeezed together. You may need a gap as large as 1/8".

    Your load may change slightly but your groups will no longer string and probably shrink 25%. Don't worry about getting a new stock or doing additional work on the action until the bedding and testing is complete. I bet you the performance will improve enough that no further work will be desired.

    Also consider testing with bullets like the Hornady SST, Sierra Matchking or Nosler BT. These bullets are capable of match grade accuracy and shoot very well in almost all rifles that I have tested. Many hunting bullets are not consistent enough for sub MOA groups so testing with them will not show the true performance of your rifle. Once a baseline is established, you can easily compare other hunting bullets and you will know that it is the bullet, not the rifle, if groups open up.

    On to project rifle number two...

    Jerry
     
  9. jadams

    jadams Member

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    interesting thread. I've got a Savage 112 with the factory plastic stock -though it is free-floated and pillar-bedded already, would it gain any accuracy from an after-market stock, or better to just glass bed the factory one?

    All input appreciated!

    Gracias! [​IMG]
     
  10. Mysticplayer

    Mysticplayer Writers Guild

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    Rhoman,

    A stock is a convenient device to hold on to the action and barrel. It must be rigid, stable, and fit the shooter and application. Other then that material or shape is up to the end user.

    The injection molded stocks have pretty flimsy forends but as long as it can not hit the barrel during recoil, it doesn't matter. When resting on a bag, there is very little force applied to the stock so it is actually pretty rigid.

    Bed the action, lug, and under the first 1 to 2" of barrel. Make sure that the action is not strained when the action screws are tightened. There must be no movement at all.

    It will work as well as another stock with the same profile but made from a different material. There is enough rigidity through the action area, wrist, and buttstock to work.

    When shooting, place the front bag within 4" of the front of the receiver. This is the most rigid area of the forend, widest and usually the flattest too. Also make sure that each shot is made with the rifle in the same bag placement.

    Good luck...

    Jerry
     
  11. kc

    kc Well-Known Member

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    Guys I like this post..I have a new
    REMI VLS 308. it shoot great when the barrel is clean but after 10 or so shots they start to wonder till I bring out the mop/brush.
    I am planing to bed the action next I floated the barrel already and the trigger is tuned so sweet it will make you smile. How much trouble is it with a laminant?
    this stock holds the action with a death grip. It is a real SOB to take apart to clean and this is one thing I do alot.
    There is well over 300 rounds a month loaded and shot with each of my(4) range rifles..
    I know you guys have alot experence thay myself when it comes to building and shootin rifles but I have a old 03A3 Springfield I
    built with a Douglas barrel back in 1970 and
    any deer out to 300 yards is mine..
    Hey! Thanks for the post..Keith.