Custom Bolt

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by bjlooper, Jan 30, 2007.

  1. bjlooper

    bjlooper Well-Known Member

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    Jan 29, 2006
    What is a PTG bolt, I've heard alot of references to it. Is it a desirable up grade, and why?
    DR B
     
  2. Ballistic64

    Ballistic64 Well-Known Member

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    Baylor, I believe its an aftermarket bolt sold in the white (needs machined).Dave at Pacific Tool&Guage sells them and if Im not mistaken so does Darrel Holland.They can be finished to give a much better fit in a production action.
     

  3. strictlyRUM

    strictlyRUM Well-Known Member

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    They are fully machined. You just need to weld the handle on. You can buy them in .0001 increments for desired fit for YOUR action. They allready have a Sako style extractor and come with a nice aftermarket bolt handle. He makes the bolts in alot of the aftermarket actions also. I use them in all my personal builds. Easier and better results than truing the remington one. Also you can ream a bolt raceway and order an oversize so you dont have to "bush" anything. Just one solid prefinished bolt. It is in the white so you will have to blue it or coat it.

    Jason
     
  4. Ballistic64

    Ballistic64 Well-Known Member

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    I stand corrected,thanks for the info Jason. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cool.gif
     
  5. strictlyRUM

    strictlyRUM Well-Known Member

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    My post was not meant to correct just to add. I am sorry if I came accross that way. I just think Dave is an outstanding stand up guy who makes a hell of a product. Plus he is a fellow Oregonian who doesnt toot his own horn.

    Jason
     
  6. Ballistic64

    Ballistic64 Well-Known Member

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    No apology necessary Jason,I was under the impression "in the white" meant the final machining for fit was required.