cross hairs and magnification

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by casilva43, Feb 13, 2012.

  1. casilva43

    casilva43 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    75
    Joined:
    May 18, 2005
    I have a Mark IV 6.5 X 20 scope. When I adjust the maginification no the scope the crosshairs are also magnified. Is this a positive attribute. What power should the scope be in for judging distance? What power should the scope be in when taking a longer distance shot?
     
  2. brentc

    brentc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,610
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Sounds to me like your Mark 4 is a Front Focal Plane design. You can use your reticle to range at any magnification. Use whatever power you feel most comfortable with to make your shot.
     

  3. casilva43

    casilva43 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    75
    Joined:
    May 18, 2005
    Is a front focal plane the most desirable?
     
  4. Scot E

    Scot E Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,312
    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2008
    My opinion only. If you are going to use your reticle for anything besides just shooting with the center crosshair then yes, I think a front focal plane (FFP) is better. You can range or use the reticle for holdovers at any power range and the reticle subtentions stay the same and the math and numbers stay the same. Not true with a SFP scope. So the FFP reticle is faster easier and reduces the potential for error.

    Like you mentioned the reticle grows as the magnification is increased. Basically it is staying the same size in relation to the target as you increase or decrease power. With a SFP scope the target would increase in size in relation to the target as the power is increased.

    The only real concern I would say to look out for with an FFP reticle is to make sure the reticle isn't too thick for the targets you intend on acquiring. With some of the older scopes this can be a problem. But mostly for big game it isn't. And most of today's FFP scopes have nice, thin reticles.

    HTH,

    Scot E.