camo

Discussion in 'Backpack Hunting' started by ducmarc, Jul 8, 2014.

  1. ducmarc

    ducmarc Well-Known Member

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    Aug 8, 2013
    fixing to up grade my camo this year i'm tired of being cold and mismatched.needs to be good for 0 or colder but not break the bank.i wear long jons but would like to get away from them. also looking for a good chest rig for my side arm
     
  2. dmj

    dmj Well-Known Member

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    Nov 16, 2013
    To me clothing questions are always hard. Sitting in a stand or being on the move. Different people stand the heat or cold better than others. Open country or wooded areas. I like to layer and very seldom sit still very long except when glassing. A couple of types of clothing I like are the Core 4 Element and First Lite. They aren't the cheapest on the market, but not the most expensive either. And I will admit I very seldom hunt when it's 0 degrees.
    Not quite sure what you are requesting in a carry method for your pistol. A few years ago my wife decided I was going to pack a pistol when I was archery hunting. I usually hunt alone except when my son can get away to hunt with me. Who was I to argue with her an excuse to buy another firearm and her idea. Believe me I didn't let any grass grow under my feet. I tried several ways to pack it and there just wasn't a comfortable way, considering you are packing a bow, pack and etc. I had a back support system ( goes around your waist and velcros together and has the suspender straps that goes over your shoulders). Put it on and got it adjusted, then request my daughter-in-law to sew the adjustments on the left side of the waist together. Laid my pistol in there and she marked it. Sewed it together then put a velcro strap that holds it in. For me this works quit well. Can carry all day and never even know it's there. Don't know if that helps. Have a nice day and good luck.
     

  3. orchemo

    orchemo Well-Known Member

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    I move a lot elk hunting in northern Idaho. I also get cold when I glass.

    I tend to pack a down coat and a good wind shell (pants and coat).

    I just picked up a Therma-rest Z-seat. Sitting on a cold rock makes you even colder.

    Therm-a-Rest Z-Seat Pad at REI.com
     
  4. macvrlamm

    macvrlamm Active Member

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    Aug 21, 2010
    I use 100% military clothing it's tuff and fits well and the cold weather gear is good stuff I have several patterns and like digital woodland and the new atacs FG have parkas and liner one liner fits all and you can not beet the price if you have some one in the military other than the navy you can have them get it for you it works for me
     
  5. hardtack

    hardtack Member

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    Just picked up a new Gortex suit from the UK. Multi Terrain Pattern. It has the slash paint brush effect of their old DPM but the multicam colours. The colours seem slightly darker than US multicam. I'll be trying it out this year. The price was very, very good.
    I use the long range vest from Arktis. works for me. It has a holster for a side arm but since this is Canada I put my hunting license there.
     
  6. Rucker61

    Rucker61 Well-Known Member

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    Eberlestock has a new bino harness that's got a pocket for a handgun.
     
  7. Biggs300

    Biggs300 Well-Known Member

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    Feb 15, 2011
    Over the past few years, I have started moving away from full camo because, there seems to be more and in some cases better options at reasonable prices. In fact, the only camo I now use is my Gore-tex soft shell jacket that I use to cover my down puffy when it's raining or really snowy. My pants are all solid, earth-tone colors in either merino wool (FirstLite Kanabs) or fully waterproof LL Bean Gore-tex upland game pants. The Bean pants have proven themselves several times over the past couple of years of use. They are warm and, again, fully waterproof. I have a closet full of camo clothing (some expensive pieces) that have failed me in one way or another (not warm or not waterproof or both).
     
  8. Litehiker

    Litehiker Well-Known Member

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    1. Gore-Tex camo parka (W/ pit zips) and pants for the outer "hard shell".

    2. Synthetic jacket for insulating layer (If using a down jacket try to get one with Dri-Down or Down Tech treated down. This down is highly resistant to moisture and dries VERY fast.)
    HINTS:
    ->This jacket can also be worn in your sleeping bag to extend its temperature range downward by at least 10 F.
    ->Zip up and cinch closed the hood of you GTX parka and pull the parka over the foot of your sleeping bag for more warmth and to keep tent frost from melting on the foot of the bag and wetting it.

    3. synthetic or wool sweater mid layer

    4. expedition (heavy) weight polyester long johns (Cabela's sells many types) base layer. Get zip turtle neck tops. For extreme cold put one size larger CUT OFF bottoms over the long john bottoms. These cut-offs should come to just above your knees to protect your femoral arteries from the cold. Eskimos use a similar setup.

    5. Vapor Barrier Lining (VBL) socks of thin neoprene diver's socks that have been seam-sealed. Wear thin poly liner socks beneath them and change DAILY. This will keep your boot insulation warm B/C it keeps it DRY and there are no wool socks ever made that will keep you as warm as the thin, closed-cell neoprene diver's socks.
    Yeah, you can get away with duct-taped plastic bags as a VBL but they are fragile.

    6. Gore-Tex glove shells with REMOVABLE heavy and medium weight pile or fleece liners. Carry spare liners to always have a dry pair available and choose weight of liners depending on the temps.
     
  9. wpwarren

    wpwarren Well-Known Member

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    Nov 24, 2013
    I've hunted and worked in really cold weather down to -42 and I wouldn't consider going without a layering system. If a jacket is warm enough on its own you will be cooking in it when you start moving. I wear 1 or 2 wool layers (capilene if it is really wet) then a nice fleece layer, then a thin wind stop layer followed by a down jacket then a waterproof windproof shell when it is super cold. This system will get me down to 20 below comfortably if I am sitting. Much colder than that and I just don't sit around.

    As far as carrying a handgun while hunting (or hiking, riding a dirtbike, skiing, or anything else active) I use a hill people gear kit bag. It is really comfortable and easy to use and I bought the regular bag so i have room for my maps, some snacks, and my gps in it too as well as a basic first aid kit. With this setup I can leave the backpack behind for stalking or technical climbing excursions. I wear this under my backpack so I can take the main pack off without having to remove the kitbag.
     
  10. Broke Okie Ty

    Broke Okie Ty Member

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    I buy (sometimes get free) used/new military stuff. Its cheap and durable. you could almost buy 2-3 full sets of layers for the price of 1 set of sitka/kuiu system. I have 2 sets of the military gortex rain gear. 1 in woodland and 1 in desert. The idea is that no matter what color my "warm" clothes are, I can still camo out if need be.

    As for carrying a side arm (which I believe is always a good idea, especially alone) you can not go wrong with a cross draw holster. If your pistol is compact enough, say 4" 357 or 44mag or even a 1911, the cross draw would work very well. I assume you're looking for wolf/bear protection from your side arm? Just remember that when you are trying to set up a side arm, you want it out of the way but still accessible and I personally feel that's a great place to start with. Attach it to your belt so that even if your pack/bino rig is off, you still have it.
     
  11. Litehiker

    Litehiker Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Ty, fleece makes a good mid layer. It's heavier than quilted synthetic or down but dries fast and is very tough. 200 weight PolarTec is good over long john pants for a mid layer in bitter weather.
     
  12. Litehiker

    Litehiker Well-Known Member

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    Re: camo (fleece v.s. quilted synthetic)

    Backpackers generally choose quilted synthetic over fleece for the following reasons:

    1. Quilted synthetics (QS) pack MUCH smaller in a stuff sack than fleece
    2. QS are lighter for the warmth than fleece

    Down garments are all of this and better, especially if you get garments made with DWR (Durable Water Repellant) treated down like Dri Down or Down Tech. Sierra Designs and LL Bean carry DWR treated down items.

    I like fleece only when I'm not backpacking.
     
  13. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    ATACS is the best pattern I've ever tried or seen.

    You simply fade into whatever the environment is.
     
  14. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    If you are going to be sitting or standing in the cold/wind, and or wet for long periods pick up a surplus poncho and poncho liner to throw over yourself.

    I carry one to use to sit on as well.

    You will be amazed at how well they trap your body heat and to top it off it breaks up your outline completely.