barrel flute timing

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by partisan1911, Dec 14, 2009.

  1. partisan1911

    partisan1911 Well-Known Member

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    I recently read that when you flute a barrel it must be set to the reciever with the a flute top dead center for timing? Some gunsmith's do this and some do not so you should specify if you would like it done this way or not. Can someone enlighten me on this?
     
  2. LouBoyd

    LouBoyd Well-Known Member

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    The flute has to go on top so the scope can fit closest to the barrel. Or maybe a rib should be on top with a flute on either side to minimize gravitational barrel sag. Most likely it makes no detectable difference how fluting is oriented and it's purely cosmetic. Most fluting jobs are cosmetic. In my opinion better barrel rigidity for the weight can be achieved by proper contouring than by fluting a cylindrical barrel. Here's an example of tapering combined with fluting which makes some sense though it's not pretty. I believe this is a 25mm barrel for a Bradley vehicle.

    http://www.perthmilitarymodelling.com/reviews/vehicles/barreldepot/images/bd35050pic.jpg
     

  3. Aldon

    Aldon Well-Known Member

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    Alignment or timing of the flute is probably important if you are reusing a factory barrel due to the writing that is engrageved or punched onto it...the caliber and make etc...

    Also, I have given thought to a mountain rifle with fluting for weight reduction but with open sites as well. I never completely trust a scope.....

    It would be therefore necessary to align/time the fluting to allow a solid surface on the top of the barrel.

    Nott sure how you would specify these things other than to communicate fully with the GS.
     
  4. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    It does not make any difference where the flute or rib is placed as far as accuracy but from
    a cosmetic standpoint it must be timed with one or the other on top or it will look bad.

    I like to time them so the rib is at the stock line and not the grove so it fits the stock
    better so depending on the number of flutes you will end up with a rib or a flute on
    top.

    A good gunsmith will always time the fluting any way you want it.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  5. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

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    Very easy answer----On my competition rifles it is done that way so when I change tubes in the field there are no problems period. The way Speedy cuts the threads when it locks up it is as tight as a tick!
     
  6. LouBoyd

    LouBoyd Well-Known Member

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  7. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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  8. sambo3006

    sambo3006 Well-Known Member

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    Well said, J E Custom.
    As a person on the other side of the counter (customer), I think the same thing. I don't have the skill or tools to do the job the right way so that is what I am paying the gunsmith for.
    I definitely would not be pleased if the flutes on my barrel were not indexed properly. As far as I'm concerned, the job isn't done at that point.
     
  9. trueblue

    trueblue Well-Known Member

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    Part of the cost of paying for quality workmanship is cosmetics. Like it or not, as a consumer that is really most of what we see on a rifle build. So, a wise gunsmith in my opinion will be conscious of that fact.
    I am in the underground utility business. Everything I put in the ground gets buried. My quality has to be high, or I would go out of business due to watermain leaks and such. Put in 35years of doing this type of work, it seems the owners are mostly concerned about restoration and cosmetics, because that is what is visible. I am sure that it is similar in the gunsmithing profession.
     
  10. elkaholic

    elkaholic Well-Known Member

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    I Agree with J.E. When you see that which doesn't affect accuracy, you have to wonder about the unseen that does? I've had a PERSONAL experience with this....Rich