Any 1000yd shooters who have NOT taken a class?

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by matemike, Apr 30, 2014.

  1. matemike

    matemike Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone shoot proficiently at 1000 yards without having taken any proper training?
    Same question goes for 800 or 600 yards as well.

    Reason I ask is because my local membership range has 600-1000 yard targets but only deemed qualified folks get to use them. (There is a second gate to go through and that lock code is only given to those members.)
    The range rule as I understand it is that you have to be checked out and have the blessing from an expert marksman before you can have the code.

    But still my confusion is how did those guys get to be good enough at those extended ranges to pass the test? I plan to ask them myself next time I see someone rolling through the golden gates. I've been a member there for three years now and have never received word of a training day or test day.

    Longest I've stretched my shooting is 550 yards at a buddies deer camp. I was shooting at an empty cardboard 24pk soda box. I hit it 35 out of 50 times. So I feel good and confident with my abilities to get there.


    The range does have 300 yards open to general members like myself. Would increased practice at 300 yards put me in a position to go shoot at 600 to pass a test if I study and calculate bullet drop graphs?
     
  2. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    If you know your drops and wind dope 600yds is not a big deal IF you have the basic marksmanship skills and equipment to shoot 1" groups at 100yds.

    I never shot beyond 500yds before going into the service but I have a friend who was making 800-1,000yds shots long ago who was completely self taught. He had the advantage of lots of trigger time and being a naturally gifted shooter who dedicated himself to becoming the most proficient long range marksman possible.

    This was back in the 70's-80's before the "Long Range Rage" and when such shots were all but unheard of.

    He bought every book he could get his hands on, started reloading, and sought out well known LR shooters all over the country for help and advice.

    The amount of information accessible with a few keystrokes today on the subject is utterly amazing.

    If you have the talent, the equipment, and the skills you can get it done with basic marksmanship and a range card.
     

  3. bill123

    bill123 Well-Known Member

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    With today's technology it's a lot easier to be self taught. I'd go to your buddy's range with a paper target shoot some good groups, develop a trajectory table and then talk to one of the qualifying instructors at your range. If you show him that you can shoot at 500 and have the come ups to shoot longer, maybe he will qualify you.
     
  4. dragman

    dragman Well-Known Member

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    Most ranges have a "qualification" here too if you wanna go over 100 yards. It is basically while shooting do you exhibit safety and reasonable technic so that you are safe to shoot at further distances. it's not really about how good you are.

    I am a "1000" yard shooter in competition and groundhogs and I feel I am very good at what I do. I have gotten tips from other shooters and good friends here and there about loading and theory but as far as mechanics I am pretty much on my own for how I do thins
     
  5. CB11WYO

    CB11WYO Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely!

    I have always wondered about taking a class or something but I don't usually have money like that laying around (some of 'em cost a fair amount it seems). So I never have :)

    Study, reading tips from qualified persons etc. and lets not forget practice practice practice! Classes and courses are probably useful but the self motivated individual can do just fine on his/her own IMO.
     
  6. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    Class? What's a shooting class? :D

    Seriously though, I am 100% self-taught when it comes to any type of shooting I do. And, not bragging, but I am what some might refer to as a "natural" or "crack-shot" when it comes to handling any types of weapons.
     
  7. gohring3006

    gohring3006 Well-Known Member

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    growing up in Ohio its a shotgun state my idea of a rifle was a 22longrifle then I was 13 my dad got me a .22 magnum man I was shooting a high powered rifle then, then I was at the range sighting in my slug gun I was able to get 4in groups at 200yrds then I was bangin the 400yrd plate 3 out 4 shots with hornady sst 12ga. That's when it bit me I went out and bought a 3006 its turned into an obsession, nobody around me shot high powered rifles so I went into it blind and taught myself through trigger time and reading and last but not least this site has helped alot there's nothing more gratifying than hitting a 10" steel plate at 1000yrds without any help from an instructor and with a rifle you set up and your own reloads
     
  8. justgoto

    justgoto Well-Known Member

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    Same here.
    I have learned more about marksmanship from this site than anywhere else.


    I don't know your ranges setup, but it sounds like your local range people don't want newbies shooting over the targets hitting nearby people or property. I'm sure they just want conformation that you are competent enough not to cause a problem.
     
  9. MMERSS

    MMERSS Well-Known Member

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    Many ranges have rules requiring all bullets to impact the berm. This could be tough at 1000 shooting a 2 MOA 308 rifle loaded with 150 Gamekings topped with a non-turret scope. Open a range to anyone and those just wanting to have fun will try to hit that barn door or even happy with the whole barn at 1000.
     
  10. matemike

    matemike Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for the responses and advice.

    I dug around and found the range rules:
    Classes are by appointment on Tuesday mornings, so I'll need to find a time to ever do that.

    ...interested shooting member must attend a qualification class and demonstrate proficiency to use the ranges of 600 yards or more...
    ...shooter must demonstrate that he/she can hit an approved target safely, at the respective extended yard line ultimately hitting the berm behind the target...

    I know I can do that. My hang up is that 300 yards is the longest range I have access to for practicing. What I'm gathering is that this goal can be met if I do my homework. I feel I will be able to study my bullet drop graphs and ballistic charts to make a safe impact at 600 yards. This will not happen tomorrow, please rest easy.

    BTW here are my LR setups to pick from:

    Savage .308 Win, 1/10" twist rate. Bushnell Elite 4.5-30X50 with ballistic turrets. I reload 168 gr. Nosler custom competition HPBT bullets

    Browning 7mm Remington Mag, 1/10" twist rate. Swarovski Z3 2.5-12X50 with quick elevation turret. I reload 168gr. Berger VLD HPBT bullets

    Weatherby .338-378 Wby, 1/10" twist . Gun came with a Leupold 2.5-8X36 so I'm in the process of glass shopping for it right now. I plan to use 225-250 grain factory ammo to sight in then reload in the future.

    Which one will be the easiest to avoid looking like the noob who shot 300 yards forever then at 600 gets his ass handed to him by the high power director and/or RSO? I'm leaning towards the 7mm.
     
  11. Lefty7mmstw

    Lefty7mmstw Well-Known Member

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    7mag if it's good enough at 300 accuracy wise.... less drop than the 308 and less overkill in some people's eyes than the big roy. The big roy would be fine if she's accurate, but there are those that see people with factory ammo and bigger cal's like that as substituting caliber for capability. In reality, who cares what you've brought as long as you can shoot it, but there are those who assume.
     
  12. Barrelnut

    Barrelnut Well-Known Member

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    The Savage 308. If you have the dope for it. No contest. have FUN. You WILL look like a noob with the other two.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2014
  13. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Shoot either the .208. .338 or 7mm Rem. Whichever of those you shoot best is the one you want to qualify with. Just make sure you have an accurate range card and a good spotter for your first round if you cannot see the impact.
     
  14. FearNoWind

    FearNoWind Well-Known Member

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    Got my basics from an uncle (about a hundred years ago) with a little more from the military and a lot more from spending time behind the sights every chance I got. No formal training - just hanging out with lots of good shooters who knew what they were talking about (no bs'rs).
    That's the place to make your inquiry. Go to the office and start asking questions. Make polite inquiries. Irritable inquires usually get you nothing.
    Most ranges offering distances over 100 yards require some proof of proficiency before permitting you to shoot at longer distances. Our long range facility requires that you turn in a 100 yard target for inspection. If it's good enough you get your "long range" certificate.
    The 1000 yard part of the facility is managed by a long range club which is organized within the range membership. They offer an invitational practice session once each month with strict firing line management. You need to know your rifle, your ammunition and your scope VERY well to quallify. Shoot off target too many times and you get sent home. gun)