.22 Caliber for Goats in Wyoming

Discussion in 'Antelope Hunting' started by jdouthit, Sep 26, 2013.

  1. jdouthit

    jdouthit Member

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    This year we can use .22 caliber rifles for Pronghorns in Wyoming. Must be at least 60 grain bullet and the case has to be at least 2 inches. Here's my question...I could only find Hornady 60 grain Hollow points due to the component crunch. I have a .223 and a .22-250. I am leaning toward my coyote rifle which is the .22-250. I have experience with the Hornady bullet shooting them in my AR for High Power competition and they are very accurate for reduced yardage matches. They are flat based so I think you are limited to 200 yards or under which is no problem. I was wondering about the performance on game though....should I load them up hot where a .22-250 excels or should I load them down to not wreak havoc on the meat? I will only take chests shots but sometimes a fast moving bullet can cause blood shot meat up into the shoulder when the small, fast moving bullet expends all of its energy on impact. Dang, I wish I could find a lead tipped bullet. Another source has told me that these bullets perform well on coyotes...going in and ripping up the insides without any fur damage. Sounds good but does anyone have any experience using these bullets on big game?
     
  2. joseph

    joseph Well-Known Member

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  3. florida boy

    florida boy Active Member

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    I also load the 65 gr. Game Kings, but used VV135. They have worked well on Florida Whitetails, which are small. Never shot one over 40 yards though. Thats a lot better group you got there than I shot last weekend.
     
  4. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    I shot several truck loads of white tails using the same bullet in my .220 swifts for many years.

    As long as you put it right behind the head in the neck, or right into the heart/lungs without hitting the shoulder they'll kill quite effectively to 400yds.

    There are however much better calibers that will give you much more reliable clean kills where bullet placement isn't so critical.

    If you are going to take a broadside heart/lung shot wait till the front leg is extended giving you a clear pass on the femur before pulling the trigger. Even better would be a shot angling slightly away where you can then easily lay it in without hitting anything other than rib.

    At 200yds or less there is however a risk of it blowing up completely without penetrating to the vitals due to the velocity.

    Hornady also makes the 60gr interlock in 22-250 loaded ammo.

    http://www.vanceoutdoors.com/products2.cfm/id/90025

    Honestly the .223 is probably a better choice due to the lower velocities at 200yds or less.
     
  5. HPW

    HPW Member

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    Just because you can doesn't mean you should. I know there are plenty of people that will tell you that a 17hmr is big enough for an antelope, if it's placed right.

    Antelope hunting isn't like deer hunting. The distances are usually much further and there is almost always wind. Give yourself a better chance of a clean kill by using a caliber that shoots flatter further, bucks the wind better and performs well on game.

    I still use my 7wsm when the wind is kicking. It did the trick this weekend when a .223 would have been blown away.
     
  6. chucknbach

    chucknbach Well-Known Member

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    I think he asked about a certain bullets performance not whether he should or not.

    If your going to use that canon on antelope make sure you hit them in the head or neck to keep from having nothing but a mass of red jelly. You can shoot mice with a .243 but that doesn't mean you should.
     
  7. jdouthit

    jdouthit Member

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    Fellas, thanks for all of the replies....I really appreciate them. I have returned from our hunt in Unit 22 of Wyoming. I had two left over doe tags. The first doe I found was at 260 yards. I took "Wild Rose's" recommendation and used my Rem 700 VLS in .223. I loaded the Hornady 60 gr HP flat based bullet with 26.3 gr of Varget. The bullet did not exit but did some damage inside her chest cavity. Took two steps and expired. No blood shot meat in the entry side shoulder which was what I was afraid of. The second doe was taken at 75 yards....a big dry doe. I hit her about an inch behind her shoulder with a full broadside shot. The bullet exited and really messed up her chest cavity. Again, no noticeable blood shot meat in either shoulder. Will I use this bullet again?....I will probably save them for coyotes and find a more suitable lead tipped bullet. I really enjoyed using my prairie dog gun to shoot antelope and the .223 in my mind is a suitable caliber for taking Antelope sized game. I think you can use this caliber/load out to 300 yards on Antelope if the wind is not blowing. Maybe 200 yards if you have full value wind. We had a blast in ol' wonderful Wyoming!