Zeiss mil dot help (new scope)

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by sdowney, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. sdowney

    sdowney Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    49
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Hey all, I have a Zeiss Conquest 6.5 x 20 x 50mm with Mil dot reticle #43. If I understand the math correctly, the mil dot is accurate only at full power since this is a SFP scope. So, at 20x, the dots will be spaced 3.375 MOA apart, center to center. Am I on the right track? Neither the Zeiss handbook nor the web site helped.

    Thanks in advance.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2009
  2. Jon Jackoviak

    Jon Jackoviak Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    385
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2003
    Actually the Conquest 6.5-20x50 Mil Dot is set at 10 power. On 10 power, from center of dot to the center of the next dot represents 3.6" at 100 yards.
     

  3. sdowney

    sdowney Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    49
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    So, the more I ponder, the more I think the mil dot may have been a waste of my time. Is it only accurate and useful at 10x or can I say it's one half mil dot at 20x?
     
  4. BROWN TROUT

    BROWN TROUT Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    46
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    It is more to think about to prepare for a shot, but if you know the correct power setting and 2x correct setting you have more versatility than a FFP mil dot. Also, FFP reticle appears to enlarge when going up in power, so the reticle can interfere with a small target at large range.

    I think for combat use FFP is the only choice.
    For smaller, less dangerous game, I prefer SFP.
     
  5. lever-hed

    lever-hed Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    248
    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    If it’s a FFP, the last guy was right, the reticle increases or decreases with magnification, so the mil adjustments remain constant no matter what magnification. (this is actually an advantage)
    You never mentioned what you will be using it for, what type of game, or target only, this would help a lot in giving advice.
    The MD system is actually a very nice system once learned. No matter what you use there is a learning curve , You are on the right track though, the reticle is the most important aspect for deciding on a scope.

    Check this site:
    http://www.mil-dot.com/Mil_Dot_User_Guide.htm
     
  6. Jon A

    Jon A Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,092
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2001
    It should be, but I always suggest one measures to be sure. It's certainly not as convenient (why I prefer FFP) but it should be very usable as a 1/2 scale on 20X. I primarily use the reticle for holding wind and you could still print your wind dope in mils and use it on either power if you just remember to double up for 20X. Same for elevation if you want to hold that in some situations too.
     
  7. Jon Jackoviak

    Jon Jackoviak Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    385
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2003
    I just looked at my Zeiss subtension sheet and it is 1.8" at 100 yards on 20x, so it is a half mil on 20x.
     
  8. Bravo2Zero

    Bravo2Zero New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    I just finished a tactical course and one of the exercises was ranging with a mil dot scope. I discovered the Zeiss Conquest 6.5-20 ranges accurately only at 12 power. I then realized what the big ridge is on the power adjustment knob. It's the 12 power setting for quick ranging without having to look off target.

    You can verify this by making two heavy black lines 3.6 inches apart and moving 100 yards away. 10 power is close but 12 power is bang on the center of the mil dots.
     
  9. dww

    dww Member

    Messages:
    20
    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2006
    I just bought one of these scopes.

    Anyone else using them successfully?

    That whole 12X calibration thing is wiggy.

    Does anyone have a location to download the mildot reticle specs for the Zeiss?
     
  10. jwp475

    jwp475 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,595
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2005


    Scope spec is one thing, what the scope actually does is another