When do you bed??

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Nimrod1203, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. Nimrod1203

    Nimrod1203 Well-Known Member

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    I've just bought a Mcmillan stock. It's my first one and i was wondering when do you guys bed? or when do you not. I've never done a bedding job, so i thought about trying it on this rifle. Mcmillan says that most of their machining is precise enough as to aleviate the need for bedding. Just going to see what you all thought.
    Nimrod
     
  2. SpencerSS

    SpencerSS Well-Known Member

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    Never hurt by bedding. Do a good job and it can only help; not to mention, it's a cheap tune-up.
     

  3. projp

    projp Active Member

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    Usually about 11 but some nights as late as 11:30
     
  4. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Usually before the first shot. Why waste expensive bullets?
     
  5. Nimrod1203

    Nimrod1203 Well-Known Member

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    Maybe i should just sleep on it.....:D in all honesty i'd like to be proficient at simple gunsmithing tasks....like bedding. I'm thinking of trying it out on my .22 a remington 504. especially since the nearest gunsmith to me now is a ways away. Anyways, I'm not wanting to ruin my new Mcmillan, so i'll start somewhere else.
     
  6. theflyonthewall

    theflyonthewall Well-Known Member

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    That's a great idea....starting somewhere else. I'm not great at bedding stocks, but I'm better than I was when I first started. It's soooo easy to put in too much bedding compound and almost glue your action to the stock.

    Definitely practice on a less expensive stock so that if you end up having to grind some of the bedding compound back out because you used too much, your not going to be heartbroken about doing it on your new McMillan.
     
  7. strombeckj

    strombeckj Well-Known Member

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    I have never seen a rifle shoot any worse by bedding it... I have seen them shoot better though. :rolleyes:

    I would practice on a less expensive stock also...MCM are getting up there in $$$

    Jon
     
  8. snowlife

    snowlife Banned

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    Yup, why? it not worth the price.
     
  9. rscott5028

    rscott5028 Well-Known Member

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    A proper bedding job can only help.

    With a well engineered/made stock such as McMillan, it's not likely to make a huge improvement in your accuracy.

    But, it will help ensure that you get consistent/repeatable results over time and with disassembly, cleaning, and reassembly.

    With laminate or wood stocks, it can make a huge difference over time and varying weather conditions.

    And, if you don't do it from the start, then you run the risk of having to start over with your load development.

    There are lots of good videos and explanations here. But, you can only learn by doing it. I would practice on a less expensive stock first if possible.

    -- richard