Trouble calling in yote?

Discussion in 'Coyote Hunting - From 10 Yards to over 1,000 Yards' started by Captn C, Jan 10, 2008.

  1. Captn C

    Captn C Well-Known Member

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    Our lease is 8K of coastal brush and I have been trying to call some coyotes last year and some this year. The only thing that has responded has been a couple Bobcats. Not that that was bad, but coyotes are thick on the place. I have been using a OLD Stewart casset player. I have been using the wood pecker and the jack rabbit. The very first few times I tried about 10 years ago it worked like a charm.

    I bet it's been 6 or 7 years since I last used it, but they are still not coming to it.

    What to do?

    We also have TONS of coons...what sound would be good for them?
     
  2. bwaites

    bwaites Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm....convinces the bobcats but not the coyotes? That's tough, but may be time for a remote caller.

    Consider changing to a cottontail, and using a lower volume. If there are lots of coyotes, and you start out really noisy, it sometimes scares them off.

    As for coons, well, bird squeaks and frog croakings have worked for friends, but we don't have enough coons around that I even try.

    Bill
     

  3. devildoc

    devildoc Well-Known Member

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    How are you setting up? I like to use a motion decoy of somekind, can be as simple as a wing tied up in the air to flutter in the breeze. Also I like to setup UPWIND from a large open area so they have to expose themselves for a shot if they want to come in from downwind. Start soft and don't call much and work up to loud and calling almost constantly. If they haven't shown up in 45min to an hour, they aren't going to, so it's time to move and try again.
     
  4. ricknolan

    ricknolan Well-Known Member

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    Check the wind. Wind is the key to killing them yotes. Get a mouth call and blow on it.
     
  5. DCGS

    DCGS <strong>Official LRH SPONSOR</strong>

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    What calls are you using to try to get them to come in? I was hunting this afternoon and got them to respond but not to come in. I am new at coyote hunting and was lucky the first time out and got one. The second time there was one in the field when we got there, since then no luck at all.
     
  6. Captn C

    Captn C Well-Known Member

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    Our lease is nearly flat and the wind very predictable. I try to hunt into the wind on all set-ups. The property is solid brush, so we can only see down right of ways, roads and pipe lines. So the use of a decoy really wouldn't help...they never come out of the brush to see it....

    When I set up I turn on the caller and let it play at a medium setting and after about 10 minutes turn it up to wide open. Then back down after about 10 more minutes. That worked the first three times I tried it a several years ago. Called up 5 in three tries.

    I have another lease in the hill courty of Texas and the coons (which are thick there too) have come in to the wood pecker call. I called up a Bobcat, coon and fox there using the above method. That was the only afternoon I used the call there too. Not that it right it the only way I know to do it.

    I also don't call for very long...30 mintues is about it. I'm I stopping to soon? I had heard Bobcats were slow to respond, so I figured if they show I have been calling long enough.
     
  7. coyotekiller

    coyotekiller Well-Known Member

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    decide wether you want cats or coyotes to come to your calls. Playing the caller constantly for long periods is good for cats but no so good for coyotes. If you are mainly going after coyotes, call at low to med volume for about 2 min. and then stay silent for 2-3min. Repeat this 4-5 times for a set. A coyote can pin piont you from the 1st or 2nd call and does not need to constantly hear the sound to keep coming. Shoot me a pm about some calls to use.
     
  8. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    Ever try a Howler? It has been my most success call. I have a Johnny Stewart digital and use the rodent on low at first in case one is close and then go to the howler. Those suckers are extremely territorial (especially in a pack) and come to chase the trespasser away. If you have big packs in the area they may try to come and gang up on a lone guest. I have gotten several doubles and one triple that way.
     
  9. Captn C

    Captn C Well-Known Member

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    That sound like a good tip. I have seen on some short prom's on varmint call guys using those and just thought they were using them for locaters.

    BTW-I see your "location". Thanks for your sacrifice for us and our country! I think about you guys constantly!
     
  10. bgoldhunter

    bgoldhunter Well-Known Member

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    A lot of good information has passed your way so far. The hardest for me to learn is to turn off the caller, and to watch my volume. To me, it seems coyotes are much more sensitive to volume than bobcats.

    Also, what worked one day may not work the next. If a cottontail doesn't bring them in, switch to a jackrabbit-even if you don't have any around. Red fox calls can bring them in as well.

    You can try a fawn distress, especially right after they are dropping. A trick with that I've learned is set up next to a barbed wire fence (there are loads in my area), and shake it around while using the fawn distress. It works better with a partner, with one working the fence/call in a low spot, and a shooter. The caller still needs to check his six, as you sometimes never know where they come in.

    Later in the season, a good go-to call for me to use is a few howls, then switch to a hurt pup. Repeat a few times, and mix up the order. Sometimes just the howls work, and sometimes just the hurt pup.


    Mix it up, watch your volume, and the wind. You will have luck, but hunting coyotes has a steep learning curve. Good luck!