Target scopes...How do I???

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by fowlguy, Feb 18, 2005.

  1. fowlguy

    fowlguy New Member

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    Alright, I am new to this long range shooting thing but I want to get involved. First off I shoot a 30-06 and I would like to use it for at least one more year for deer/elk before upgrading.
    I am going to get a Leica finder, Leupold Gold Ring spotter and am going to be putting on a new scope...Here's where I am lost, I would like to be able to dial in the range on my scope...But how does this work?
    Say I have a 30-06 and my buddy has a 7mm Ultra MAg we both buy Leupold Mark 4 tactical scopes with target knows/adj whatever there tech. term is...
    Now the scope is going to move the same amount for each adjustment even though we are shooting different claibers...can someone line me out on getting the the right scope and how I dial it in??
    Thanks Lost in the long range world
     
  2. Pete Lincoln

    Pete Lincoln Well-Known Member

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    read up all you can on trajectory and ballistics.
    Pete
     

  3. Dave King

    Dave King Well-Known Member

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    Fowlguy

    "Now the scope is going to move the same amount for each adjustment even though we are shooting different claibers...can someone line me out on getting the the right scope and how I dial it in??"


    The scope adjustments (turrets) will correct for trajectory... for example; Your 30-06 might need 11 MOA of UP adjustment over a 100 yard zero to get to a 500 yard zero while the 7mm UltraMag may only need 7 MOA to do the same thing. What you need to know is YOUR trajectory and don't worry about his... you zero at 100 yards and if the elk is 500 yards away you adjust your turret to 11MOA and you're dead-on at 500 yards. The scope (turret adjustment) is just a calibrated measurement device that you adjust the correct amount for the trajectory of the rifle you're shooting.

    IF you get a calibrated reticle type scope, the one with the circles or lines for aiming points, you will then possibly need to get a different scope than your buddy with the 7mm Ultra Mag.

    The better IMHO way is to get a scope with turrets and adjust the turrets for the elevation...you can then swap the scope to any rifle and establish new come-up data after the swap.
     
  4. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Well-Known Member

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    I would just like to add that you don't have to have a target style knob to shoot long range. The regular adjustment dials found on most hunting scopes are calibrated in the same angle measurement (called MOA) as the big varmint and target scopes. I own 5 big target scopes for varminting, and 5 regular scopes. I can shoot the same distances with both types, it just takes a nickel to move the regular dials. I find that the target knobs are too big and tall for big game hunting as they can sometimes get in the way.

    I think you've probably seen turrets on tv that are calibrated for yardage and not minute of angle (MOA). For example: The elk is at 500 yards so twist the knob around to number 5. This is a special turret that has been calibrated for a particular load, and does not work as well as some might think. More on that later.
    Your scope will be calibrated in MOA which is a universal measurement regardless of bullet or speed. You just have to take your own load and figure your MOA adjustment. This is easy with the help of a ballistic program. If you don't have one yet, there are many sites on the web where you can get access to a program.
    Good shooting!
     
  5. justice

    justice Member

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    5
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    Oct 28, 2004
    [ QUOTE ]
    Alright, I am new to this long range shooting thing but I want to get involved. First off I shoot a 30-06 and I would like to use it for at least one more year for deer/elk before upgrading.
    I am going to get a Leica finder, Leupold Gold Ring spotter and am going to be putting on a new scope...Here's where I am lost, I would like to be able to dial in the range on my scope...But how does this work?
    Say I have a 30-06 and my buddy has a 7mm Ultra MAg we both buy Leupold Mark 4 tactical scopes with target knows/adj whatever there tech. term is...
    Now the scope is going to move the same amount for each adjustment even though we are shooting different claibers...can someone line me out on getting the the right scope and how I dial it in??
    Thanks Lost in the long range world

    [/ QUOTE ]


    if your '06 is a shooter no real need to change that-glass is extremely important-leupold is a great choice for a reasonable amount of money-consistency is the key to long range shooting so your ammo will need to be selected carefully and then either load alot of it or buy loaded stuff preferably in the same lot #'s-check here for the dials for your scope that can be made to match your load.

    www.kentonindustries.com
     
  6. bucknutz

    bucknutz Well-Known Member

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    Jun 30, 2004
    im upgrading my mighty '06,, to a .30-06 AI. nothing wrong with that pill, learn your clicks, if its accurate
     
  7. Centre Punch

    Centre Punch Well-Known Member

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    Oct 29, 2004
    Fowlguy,
    One thing that was not mentioned by previous posters, is internal adjustment.
    If you intend to shoot out 1000yds in the future, consider a scope which has enough internal adjustment to put you on at 1000yds from your 100yd zero, or alternatively purchase a sloping scope base (20moa, 25moa,or even 40moa).
    Scopes with 30mm tubes usually offer more adjustment,but not necessarily. Check this out before buying.
    Like myself, many shooters like to use a moa base and a scope with plenty of adjustment. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    Centre Punch.

    I use the Leupold 8.5-25x50 LRT with M1 turrets
     
  8. Glock119

    Glock119 Well-Known Member

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    fowlguy, welocome to LRH, in case you may not have understood the whole MOA - Turret - Inch thing here is a copy of a post I had done for another fellow to help him try to understand it all. hope It can be of help to you as well.

    Think of it this way. (if your scope clicks = 1/4 moa " minutes of angle" per click)
    at 100 yds 1 click = 1/4" and 2 clicks = 1/2".
    at 200 yds that same 1 click now equals 1/2" and the 2 clicks = 1"
    at 300 yds that same 1 click now equals 3/4" and the 2 clicks = 1 1/2"
    at 400 yds that same 1 click now equals 1" and the 2 clicks = 2"
    and so on.

    As another member pionted out your scope may only need to be ajusted lets say 4 clicks at 250 yards but your buddys may only need to be adjusted 2 clicks for the same distance. Each click is spaced the same its just your bullet drops faster than your buddys so you need more clicks to rise where the bullet will impact.

    also different scopes have different values some may have 1/4 moa as listed but others may have 1/8 or 1/2 or even 1 moa per click.

    and just remember 4 clicks of 1/4 = 1 MOA not 1" (except for at 100 yds)4 clicks = 1 MOA and 1" in this example at 100 yds

    on some of the better scopes (most tactical models) the turrets will be marked a little better than others. for example some of them will have big slash followed by 3 little marks and a big slash (labeled 1) then 3 little ones and a big slash (labeled 2) and so on. the big slash = 1 MOA and each of the little marks =1/4 MOA then all you have to do is go to the range sight in and set turret to zero. then if you have made a range card that tells you how much your bullet will drop in MOA (Minute of Angle) all you have to do is dial it in.

    Something like this around turret:

    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
    liiiliiiliiiliiiliiiliiiliiiliiiliiil
    the spacing is not correct but you get the idea(i hope)

    Example: (and i do mean example) 308 win 165 grain bullet you zero at 100yds. your range card says your bullet will drop
    2.0" at 200 yds = 1MOA or 2"......turn turret to #1 take shot
    4.9" at 300 yds = 1.5MOA or 4.5"......turn turret to #1 plus 2 little marks take shot
    8.3" at 400 yds = 2MOA or 8"......turn turret to #2 take shot
    12.2" at 500 yds = 2.5MOA or 12.5"......turn turret to #2 plus 2 little marks take shot
    16.6" at 600 yds = 2.75MOA or 16.5"......turn turret to #2 plus 3 little marks take shot

    .25 moa = 1 little mark,
    .5 moa = 2 little marks,
    .75 moa = 3 little marks

    so all you have to do is now dial your turret to the # 2 plus two small marks at 500 yds. 2 plus two small marks = 2.5MOA at 500yds or in other words 12.5". Your range card said your bullet would drop 12.2" so as you can see with 2.5 MOA which equals 12.5" your only shooting about a 1/4" high based on this example.This will put you dead on the target with no hold over.

    as you can see there is no real counting this way which allows you to get on target much faster than counting out the same 10 clicks if you were to count clicks on standered type scopes (those without turrets). But if you use a scope that does not use this type of turret marking, counting may be needed, but not fun.

    also if you get some of the target models they too sometimes have their turrets marked in the same manner.

    Hope this helps.
    Ben
     
  9. Michael Eichele

    Michael Eichele Well-Known Member

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    A simple way is like this"

    Bullet drop at range (Inches) divided by inches per click multiplied by range divided by 100.

    IE. 60" of drop / (.26175 * 600 / 100)= 38 clicks.

    .26175 * 600/100 = 1.5705 At 600 yards 1 clcik = 1.5705 Now divide 60" of drop by 1.5705.

    This works for a scope with .25 MOA adjustments which works out to .26175" per click at 100 yards. At 1000 yards its 2.6175" per click.

    To figure from MOA clicks to inches per click multiply MOA by 1.047 .25 MOA * 1.047 = .26175"
     
  10. Ridge Runner

    Ridge Runner Well-Known Member

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    Dec 13, 2002
    Just remember MOA: a unit of angular measurement which is 1/60th of 1 degree actually equals 1.047" per 100 yds.
    100 yds. 1.047"
    200 yds. 2.094"
    250 yds. 2.6175"
    300 yds. 3.141"
    1000 yds. 10.47"
    RR