Stop the bleeding now!

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by 436, Nov 8, 2012.

  1. 436

    436 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    648
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    OK... gentlemen I have a question for all of you. Now be honest in your response.

    How many of you that hunt rifle or archery carry a "tourniquet" that you can self apply and/or "quick clot" in one form or another?

    Not talking about a small first aid kit... taking about those items.

    The rest of the question; And don't just take it into the field when your hunting, but anytime your on the range and/or in the field with you?

    Personally; I don't make a move with my firearms/hunting of any type, or travel without them on me, or near me.

    Let see what you say.

    436
     
  2. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,786
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    No, not unless you count a belt or bootlaces. I usually have a long piece of rope chord with me that might work if needed.?

    Tell me about "quick clot" Is like the stuff we use on livestock at brandings to stop bleeding? Powder that goes on the wound.
     

  3. 436

    436 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    648
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Well? sure I guess you could use about anything, if your pants don't fall down or your boot comes off while you trying to move for medical help. :D

    I was thinking of something a little dedicated as a tourniquet. Blood clot... yes it's kinda like it, it can be in many forms, powder, gauze, liquid and so on.
    Here'...., this will give you some help with your question.. ZMedica - QuikClot® adsorbent hemostatic agent speeds coagulation & rapidly stops blood loss: Z-Medica Corporation

    436
     
  4. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,786
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    OH, wait just a minute! Hold the horses.

    I do usually have a tourniquet!!

    I usually pack a snake bite kit and it's got one. Not a surgical rubber one, but it's there nonetheless.

    Unfortunately I don't carry it in the winter since no snakes are out then.:rolleyes:
     
  5. ICANHITHIMMAN

    ICANHITHIMMAN Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,380
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    I have a blow out kit on me at all times. It consist of a tourniquet, israle bandage 2 different sized quick clot sponges, gauze, tape,gloves and contact info for my family, and an ace bandage. I had some other stuff but ditched it.
     
  6. 436

    436 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    648
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009

    No snakes in the winter??? :D But'..., there's more than one way to get snake bit in the field...:D:D

    Cheer's..
    436
     
  7. winmag

    winmag Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,528
    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2009
    Nope, just one more piece of marketing for either the paranoid, or hemophiliac, or perhaps our current or former military members who just don't like venturing off without a piece of equipment that has been engrained as a "nesicity" in their line of work.
    I guess if the Deer, Elk, or cows were shooting back at me I'd have a different view.
    I grew up chasin cows. Leaving for 1-3 days at a time on a horse. Prepared meant making sure you had your bedroll wrapped up in your slicker, & had some coffee in your saddle bags.
    I hunt the same country I always have, & the country I grew up & played in.
    My day pack weighs ounces not pounds. (Unless I'm carying water). See the pic in my signature, & youll see why i count ounces, & absolute BARE nesicesities. Tried the whole "paranoid boyscout day pack", prepared for anything at all times, & just got sick & tired of packing useless weight around for nothing. Actually, the only use I ever got out of it was that an over stuffed pack makes a nicer shooting rest. But I have bi pods for that.
    Not trying to be gruff, nor knock your personal approach to your personal hunting style. We apparently just have radically different ideas of preparedness I guess. I'm used to doctoring myself with whatever I can come up with. We've experienced everything from DIY stitches, resetting broken bones, dealing with concussions, & severe sprains etc. & even getting people with heartattack/disecting Aorta to an ambulance & life flight. Always been able to react pretty easily to whatever was thrown our way using only our heads, & what we had with us, weather working or playing. Never once had any need for a tourniquet.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2012
  8. Too Tall Rosenwald

    Too Tall Rosenwald Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    152
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    Number of years ago I was asked to help find a lost archery hunter.
    He was a local kid with a lot of experience. We all looked for a couple days. When I found him he was dead. Bled to death. He was side hilling and slipped down and set on his broad head, side ways. Only made it 200 yards down the mountain. Found some of his gear first. Dog found the rest.

    I carry a field combat FA kit with me at all times.
     
  9. Korhil78

    Korhil78 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,829
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    Don't ever use the powder quick clot. If its windy and you get that stuff in your eyes or breathe it in...you are screwed.
     
  10. kcebcj

    kcebcj Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,215
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    I'am pretty much with winmag on this. Have been living on a remote ranch for 10 years and have spent most of my adult life in the mountains hunting and packing horseback and have witnessed some pretty rough stuff but it gets handled. What I have noticed especially the last twenty years is guys get caught up in "stuff". For instance I ran into a fella that was backpack hunting in the HCNRA and we got chatting and I asked what his pack weighed. 58 lbs was his response. Crap when I used to back pack hunt 28 lbs was heavy and that included half gallon of water.

    Sh**t happens no denying that but I think what makes people safe in the outback is just good common sense and of course experience. To each his own and if a fella wants to hunt with a 58lb pack on have at it.

    I carry a nylon cord in the back pack to hang boned out meat so I guess I have a way to stop the bleeding.
     
  11. ICANHITHIMMAN

    ICANHITHIMMAN Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,380
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    I like to be prepared for the unexpected, falling on a broad head is a big fear. Or getting shot or gored, I want every chance to come out on top. I'm in shape so humping extra gear is what I do.
     
  12. bmcnabb02

    bmcnabb02 Active Member

    Messages:
    31
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2010
    I'm with Winmag and kcebcj, I just rely on common sense.

    I don't run around no mountain tops or even ride a horse for that matter.... but I spend more time buried deep in a swamp or coastal marsh than I do at home. Can't imagine surviving could be much different one way or the other. Been in many a pinch, you just gotta figure a way out of it.

    When it's my time to go... it's my time to go, whether it's runnin crawfish traps or huntin ducks in the middle of the Atchafalaya Basin, hunting deer in the open prarie marshes of St. Mary Parish, or walking to my mailbox to check my mail.... I'll be ready for it.
     
  13. Sully2

    Sully2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,480
    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    HIGH 5!! To you and winmag both. Ive never had the opportunity to pack in elk hunt nor do some things you western guys have...BUT I have seen far too many guys go "into the field" humping EXCESSIVE amounts of JUNK...that chances are they woudnt use 1 in 20,000 times.
     
  14. ICANHITHIMMAN

    ICANHITHIMMAN Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,380
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    You guys make it sound stupid to be prepared. We don't do this because we are dumb or paranoid we do it to survive.