Some Newbie Questions.

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by RoughCut, Nov 21, 2011.

  1. RoughCut

    RoughCut Member

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    Hi all. I have been a long time lurker of this forum and love all the info there is. I have a few questions I was hoping someone could help me with.
    Recently bought a 270 wsm Sako Tecomate and am beginning my handloading quest as well. I have been around reloading for quite some time but finally got all the equipment so I can learn the craft.

    First question is. I bought the rock chucker supreme kit from RCBS which came with the Speer reloading manual which at this point is all I have. I purchased some 140 gr accubonds and some Some sierra gameking 130 gr to start dabbling with. I guess my question is can I use the reloading data for similar boat tail/ same grain bullet data from the speer manual even though the bullet is made by sierra or do I need the ACTUAL manual from every manufacturer that I plan on using. May be a dumb question but taking this endeavor on with SAFETY as my number one priority and didn't want to assume anything.

    Thanks so much in advance. I'll wait for my other questions.
     

  2. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    You can use the data from the book you've got just to get started. Just be sure to back down on the powder charge by a couple/few grains for your first attempts.

    There's alot of info on the net for free if you don't want to spend the money on another book or two.

    I like to compare 2 or 3 sources when starting loads for an unknown cartridge, you'll find that often times they don't all agree on max charge with same bullet weight and same powder. Even if you find 2 or 3 that do agree on the max charge; begin by backing it down at least 5%............safer still is back it down by 10%.
     

  3. rmorgan9718

    rmorgan9718 Well-Known Member

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    couldn't agree with SBruce more. One good source for alternate or check information is to go to the powder manufacturer's website, and they all pretty much have a good variety of loads for many different bullets.

    Try Hogdon, as they are pretty complete. The site is a little tricky at first, but persistence pays off. Also, the bullet makers either have on their website or can get you some additional info.

    Start small, log all your loads, mark different loads with different colored marks-a-lot on the brass/primer to know what is which, and be prepared to admit you don't know, and start over again.

    Been reloading for about 35 years, and it's a great way to wring the utmost from a rifle/cartridge.

    Good luck,
     
  4. RoughCut

    RoughCut Member

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    Great info guys, thanks. another quick question I have is... I see different load data all over the web and everyone has a different COAL. How do I know what my effective max and min length is? are these just trial by error lengths? I dont' understand how some loads are very similar but have different cartridge lengths. Does anybody have any thoughts on this or a reference to how length effects accuracy, etc...

    Thanks
     
  5. joe0121

    joe0121 Well-Known Member

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    Here are the things I wish I knew when I started:


    Load development:
    OCW Overview - Dan Newberry's OCW Load Development System

    Buy a Forster CoAx2 press with Lee perfect powder measure.

    Use a lee collet neck sizer and anneal your brass every three firing or so. I got .300WM brass with 7 firing on them and going strong.

    This is my personnel best bang for your buck info. I get easy 1/2 MOA loads using this equipment and best of all it doesn't cost you a first born.

    Edit: I seat my bullets into the lands.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2011
  6. joe0121

    joe0121 Well-Known Member

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    Hornady Manufacturing Company :: Reloading :: Metallic Reloading :: Tools & Gauges :: Lock-N-Load Gauges-Formerly Stoney Point :: OAL Gauges & Modified Cases :: OAL Gauges
    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phQdxDwe804]AR-MPR Build - Determining Max COL with Hornady Lock-N-Load OAL Gage - YouTube[/ame]

    I seat em jammed into the lands, If it's a hunting load where you might need to unload an un fired round in the field I seat em .010 to avoid having a round stuck in the tube and gun powder all over my action.
     
  7. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    There are a few different tools available to aid in seating depths and adjustment of same. The Hornady/Stoney Point mentioned above is one, Sinclair also makes one as does RCBS (the precision mic). I've only personally used the Sinclair and RCBS ones.

    Hopefully you have a set of dial calipers. They are a necessary tool of the reloading trade.

    Generally speaking, for hunting; you'll want to keep your COAL at a point that your ammo still feeds in the magazine. You can seat the bullets out further if you want to shoot the rifle as a single shot.

    Start your load development with the longest round you intend to use, because pressures usually go up when the bullets are seated out close to the rifleing.

    The seating depth is a preference thing, and each rifle/cartridge/bullet has it's own preference of where it shoots best.

    The OAL listed in the books is not an absolute number, meaning it is only a guideline. Your rifle may shoot best with the bullets seated out .050" further or .020" deeper......anybodys guess. Simple trial and error and good record keeping/testing principles will tell you what your gun likes.

    Just be careful of seating them out so far that they stick in the rifling when you try to unload a chambered round. This can leave powder all over in your action and ruin your day for sure. Also remember that changing the seating depth can change the chamber pressures, and proceed with caution.
     
  8. RoughCut

    RoughCut Member

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    Thanks for the help. I bought an OAL gauge from hornady as well as a comparator.

    Next question. I put some 50 loads together with different amounts of powder etc.. Is there a max number of rounds I should be shooting through my gun in an hour say. Barrel was getting pretty hot and didn't know if accuracy would decrease. Can I burn the barrel up putting too many rounds too quickly through my rifle?

    Thanks
     
  9. joe0121

    joe0121 Well-Known Member

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    That depends on a number of things. If you have a quality after market barrel that is broke in in a heavy contour you can shoot five clean and let cool. Between shots while you re acquire the target leave the bolt open to help cooling and only close it when you are ready to shoot.

    A factory/new/light contour I'd say a clean and cool between shots.

    To me "clean" mean a wet patch than dry patches till they come out clean, a deep clean is down to the raw steel all copper gone. I'd say a deep clean on a high end tube after 50 and on a factory tube after 20 or less. Depends on how fast it fouls.