shooting positions and bipod selection

Discussion in 'Antelope Hunting' started by WillHunt, Feb 27, 2014.

  1. WillHunt

    WillHunt Member

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    From what position do you take most of your shots at pronghorn in WY? I get that it depends on vegetation, topo, etc. The thing is that some bipods that are long enough to shoot from sitting, are too long in their shortest position to shoot prone on level ground. I've only hunted pronghorn once and I shot sitting, but I think it would be nice to shoot prone on longer shots, but sage brush I'm thinking likely won't allow this much of the time. What are your thoughts and what are your recommendations for bipod length? I'll be hunting WY 48 probably.
     
  2. CB11WYO

    CB11WYO Well-Known Member

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    Over on this side, SW Wyo, there's enough hill country that getting an overlook and going prone usually isn't an issue. The last 3 years all of my shots on antelope have been prone. That being said, I wouldn't go with strictly a "Benchrest" height bipod. The one I use is around 12"(-ish) at the shortest and extends to 25" or so.
     

  3. WyoElk2Hunt

    WyoElk2Hunt Well-Known Member

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    I agree with CB11WYO. gun)
     
  4. 1100 Remington Man

    1100 Remington Man Well-Known Member

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    I have never seen the need for a bipod when hunting big game, I do have one I use for Varmint hunting. When hunting Antelope I put my hat on a sage brush & lay gun across and shoot or use my day pack.
     
  5. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

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    Mostly I'm glassing from an ATV, and have both available. If I have to choose one it usually ends up being one usable from sitting. Rationale being I can usually put together something coat, pack, short sage, or rocks for a prone shot. Assessing the situation, stalk, first choice firing position, go into choosing, so stay flexible.

    This has worked for me to about 600 yards, so keep in mind those going longer have reasons behind their choices.
     
  6. Wyofax

    Wyofax Well-Known Member

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    I have hunted with a Harris in the 13"-25" range for years. Most of the time it worked well. The latest is a 9"-13". With longer shots I am much less comfortable with anything above prone. 600+ yards from the sitting position for me is extremely marginal. I will be packing a set of shooting sticks for the higher needs with the under 600 yard shots. Most of my antelope hunting is spot and stalk from the pickup so packing a set of sticks for the prairie stalk is not an issue.
     
  7. WyoElk2Hunt

    WyoElk2Hunt Well-Known Member

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    Here is a couple Antelope and rifles that were used with bipod.gun)
     

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  8. kraigwy

    kraigwy Well-Known Member

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    Guess I'm different, I don't like bipods, they always seem to be in the way, too high, or too low.

    Being an High Power shooter I like using a sling, fast on, and can instantly be used in the prone, setting or kneeling.

    I hunt in NE Wyoming, and seldom am I able to shoot from the prone position, Most is kneeling and some setting.
     
  9. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    +1! I have the same set up, I can go from prone to sitting position. A bipod not only provide a stable platform to shot but also a safe way to secure the rifle afield. I don't care much for just laying down the rifle or propping it against something when at break or while glassing.

    Sometimes you can even prop 'em antelope for the photo shoot. :D

    [​IMG]
    (http://www.longrangehunting.com/forums/f85/filled-my-antelope-tag-today-48081/)
     
  10. WyoElk2Hunt

    WyoElk2Hunt Well-Known Member

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    Nice use of tripod wil have to try the Antelope picture approach.:D
     
  11. Michael Courtney

    Michael Courtney Silver Member

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    When I took the children elk hunting, they picked the bipods they liked best for the situation, and I carried a (Caldwell) field pod, which is a tripod that provides great stability for longer shots from higher levels. Didn't end up needing, but the children and I have both practiced with it a lot, and it offers excellent stability at higher sitting, kneeling, and good stability at standing heights.

    It's not that heavy, and it is adjustable for a range of lengths, so it is completely compatible with a bipod. I'm not sure I would want to carry it up and down mountains with a long range rifle, but over flat ground it wouldn't be a problem.
     
  12. Ol'Gator

    Ol'Gator Well-Known Member

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    CB11WYO and I agree on the same size bi-pod. Some have been taken in prone position a few others while sitting. This size will accommodate both.
     
  13. Canvsbk

    Canvsbk Well-Known Member

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    All my shots have been prone. Somewhere around 15" seems best for me. Uphill downhill shots it seems nothing is right.
     
  14. Varmint Shooter

    Varmint Shooter Active Member

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    Prone position. Harris,9-13 bi-pod, with a bi-pod buddy. Rock solid at any
    range.