Scope Turrents

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Troy Arnold, Mar 2, 2012.

  1. Troy Arnold

    Troy Arnold New Member

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    I use a Savage, bolt action, 7mag with a Nikon BDC scope and a Basix trigger for my "long shots", above 300 yards. My cartrige of choice is the Remington Premier Accu Tip ABT 140gr. I was watching the Outdoor Channel the other day and a "hunter" on the show had some "turrents" on his scope that adjusted to the range he wanted to shoot. He adjusted the turrent to the range and sighted in "dead center. To say the least, I was intreged. Can anybody offer any advise or suggestions pertaing to these scope turrents? Thanks
     
  2. load

    load Well-Known Member

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  3. emn83

    emn83 Well-Known Member

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    If I'm reading this right, you are asking about what the turrets on a scope are?

    The turrets are your windage and elevation adjustment knobs. The hunter had his rifle sighted in at a certain distance and had a drip chart for his rifle/scope/round set up, and was then able to adjust his scope for the drop at that distance, from his zero, so he wouldn't have any hold over.

    If you were talking about the ballistic match turrets that Nikon makes, they manufacture turrets to match the ballistics of a particular round
     
  4. load

    load Well-Known Member

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    here in is the problem there is no one size fits all for a "round" bullet type, atmospherics, altitude, exc changes everything. couple this with many shooters lack of knowledge on the subject is a recipe for disaster! most people buying these (and selling) these "drop compensators have no clue whats happeninggun)
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2012
  5. JackinSD

    JackinSD Well-Known Member

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    If you don't do all the work to create a ballistic profile they are a waste. However, if you gain the knowledge need and do all the work, they will work well for that particular profile.

    To give an example:

    At 3300 ft elevation and 60 degress you might have a drop of 40.6" at 500 yds
    At 6000 ft and 38 degrees, all other factors the same, drop of 37.4" at 500 yds

    Not a huge difference, but could be enough to make you miss.

    Add wind drift (10mph):

    3300 and 60: 21.1"
    6000ft and 38: 16.8"

    Still not a huge difference, but once again it could be enough to create a miss.

    Take that out beyond 500 yds and you are definitely going to miss.

    at 800 yds:

    3300 and 60: 168.7" drop and 62.7" of movement
    6000 and 38: 146.2" drop and 48.4" of movement

    The only way to get a multitude of hunting environments covered it to have multiple turrents. The closer the turrent matches your shooting environment the closer they will work.

    Basically, you need to purchase multiple turrents to cover multiple hunting environments.
     
  6. johnnyk

    johnnyk Well-Known Member

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    Troy,
    Welcome to LRH. Sounds to me like the TV show you were watching may have been "Best of the West". If that was the show, it's good and I enjoy watching it when I can. They make taking game at long range look easy, and it is if you have the right equipment. I believe that was the purpose of your post.
    The scope they use are Huskemaw's. The ballistics of the particular bullet you're shooting are input into a computer program and this determines the correct yardage marks for the scope's turrets. They're either etched into the turret by a computer guided machine or could be made from some type of stickers that the marks are printed on.
    You certainly have the rifle/cartridge capable of making those long range hits and most well built, reputable named scopes can do the same thing as the Huskemaw's. In order to make a drop chart and perform these shots with a scope with target style turrets (no coin slots) you will have to know your bullets actual velocity. You will get more accurate data from a chronograph than from the back of a box of factory ammo (I'm assuming you're using factory fodder). This info, along with the bullet's ballistic coefficient, scope height, zero yardage and atmospheric data (i.e. wind, elevation barometric pressure, humidity and temperature) are fed into a ballistic program on a computer. This produdes a drop chart for your bullet's trajectory and will be good until one of the above mentioned factors changes. Ballistic programs are easily accessible on the web (check out JBM).
    Sounds like you got a itch that needs scratching. Read on brother, it just itches more! Again, welcome to Long Range Hunting. JohnnyK.
     
  7. JackinSD

    JackinSD Well-Known Member

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    Even though you get the drop chart, you will still need to do a verification step. In other words, make sure your drop chart is correct and accurate. Vortex recommends you verify to atleast 70% of the distance that you hope to get your turrent. So, not a simple fix.
     
  8. load

    load Well-Known Member

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    i would suggest, that if you want to learn to shoot long range, you should learn both the minute and milliradian systems and read up on exterior ballistics. this will help you decide on which system to buy. for a little scratchin on the itch you've gotten visit "shooter ready" .com they have a good learning tutorial/simulator that will help you understand whats being spat here! good luck!
     
  9. azsugarbear

    azsugarbear Well-Known Member

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    Kenton Industries is one of the better after-market mfgs of turrets. You would need to visit their site to see if they make one for your particular scope. Again, you need to settle in on the most accurate load or ammo for your rifle; use a ballistics program to develop a drop chart; then go out and shoot that drop chart at the elevation where most of your hunting will occur. You will most likely find that several adjustments or refinements to the drop chart will be needed to make it fit your bullet's actual trajectory.

    You will find that your bullet drop at different elevations won't matter enough to make a difference - as long as you keep your shots under 500 yards. Once you get out further, the differences become more pronounced, so you would need to dial up or down from the yardage marked on the turret to compensate for changes in elevation.

    You will find that gravity is a constant. Once you have your load and drop chart verified at different elevations - that data will not change. The challenge for most LR shooters is wind. Beyond 500 yards, it becomes a huge factor - and one that changes all the time. The "yardage-on-the-turret" method works well, but only after you gain the experience to understand how it works and what it's shortcomings are. I would suggest sticking with a MOA or Milrad turret at first. Get used to calculating drops using ballistic software and then dialing up. After you have done this for a while, then decide if the "yardage-on-the-turret" design is ultimately what you want.
     
  10. johnnyk

    johnnyk Well-Known Member

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    I never stated it was a "simple fix", but in reality it is simple. What makes it confusing is when people (who want to learn something) ask a simple question and someone answers them with an answer that is really far deeper and more complex than what they were asking.

    He asked about the turrets, not bulet drops at different temperatures and elevations.

    I believe in working for something too but let the guy start out simple and slow, a little at a time.
    I've done the leg work. I was using homemade yard sticks 25 years ago, before there were lazer range finders readily available, and actually walked the distances and verified drops! I sure as heaven was shooting long range before Vortex, this website, or the internet was started!

    So don't come off like some Art Smass that's know more than someone else. JohnnyK.
     
  11. JackinSD

    JackinSD Well-Known Member

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    Wow, dude. My intent was in no way to put your post in a bad light. In fact, I agree completely with everything you posted.

    I was only adding another step to you post.

    The not a "simple fix" comment was to the original poster. Not a comment on your post.

    Maybe the "Art Smass" could be a little premature?

    My part of the post on temp and elevation was to give an example of how one turrent would not work in all situations.
     
  12. BH Hunter

    BH Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Where do you live? I am in Spearfish and have several rifles with moa turrets. I also have a bdc turret on a scope w moa dial cut into it as well. I wasn't ready to go straight bdc. I have one of Aaron Davidsons rangefinders and it makes the BDC turret extremely cool. Still even with it the moa advantage is that beyond one revolution you have homework/ conversion to do. I hardly ever use my ballistic software under 1000 yards anymore. It will actually calculate up to 1400 for you but I havent spent a lot of time in the 1000-1400next range with it. Anything beyond 14 you still need PDA/MOA.
     
  13. JackinSD

    JackinSD Well-Known Member

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    Hot Springs is where I am at. GFP just approved a land trade down here for a shootig facility. It will be about 2.5 miles north of Maverick Jct. on the east side of the road. About 7 miles out of town towards Rapid City. Plans are for a 800yd rifle range, pistol range, skeet range, .22/air rifle range, and possibly a archery range.

    I have seen the BDC turrents that also have the MOA. Gotta say I like them.

    I was trying to get the point across to the original poster that it was not as simple as slap a BDC tuirrent on and all would be easy. The developmental of an accurate ballistic profile would be the real work. Not that it is all that hard, but was needed.

    You could probably shed alot more light on it than myself. I am still just a MOA guy, and have much to learn myself.
     
  14. johnnyk

    johnnyk Well-Known Member

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    Sorry Jack, that was totally uncalled for. I see now you were just trying to contribute and ask that you forgive me for comments, especially the Art Smass one. :( JohnnyK.