Scope ring height

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by Walker1, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. Walker1

    Walker1 Well-Known Member

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    How do you judge which ring height is right for you? I am using some Burris XTR low rings for my Sightron SIII. Scope fits fine but sometimes I have a hard time seeing through the scope. I usually use medium rings. Wondering if the low's are my problem.
     
  2. joseph

    joseph Well-Known Member

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    If your stock is high where you put your cheek you may have to get higher rings. It may be that you are not getting a correct cheek weld which would not get you low enough to see through the center of the scope.

    joseph
     

  3. Red hunter

    Red hunter Well-Known Member

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    Close your eyes and shoulder your rifle get a good comfortable cheek weld then open your shooting eye, now you will see wether your scope is high , low , forward or back, make adjustments in ring height or comb height to keep the comfortable position. If you are strugling to keep a good sight picture in your scope you will never shoot to your potential.
     
  4. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    There are a couple things besides cheek weld and comb (height of stock) that dictate ring height. More importantly is the clearance between the optic at the objective end and the rail or the barrell, especially with larger objectives like the newer 50mm or 54mm objectives.

    It'a all a compromise between what you are comfortable with and how the opric fits your firearm.
     
  5. Red hunter

    Red hunter Well-Known Member

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    I would try the med rings you have been comfortable with in the past. If you get a natural/ comfortable sight picture again you are fixed. Make adjustments on your rifle to get a good sight picture. Compromising natural sight picture is hard to be repeatable.