New guys to the group

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Asquared, Apr 21, 2013.

  1. Asquared

    Asquared Member

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    Hello Guys/Gals

    I am brand new to the group and very new to long range shooting and hunting, so forgive me if I say anything that does not make sense. I have lived in Pittsburgh the last 4 years and have recently moved back to southeast Idaho. I am looking forward to hunting this fall but realized it has been a while since I have had to make a shot at over 200 yards. I began to investigate long range shooting and am quickly becoming addicted. With that little background finally here is my question.

    I have a stock Remington BDL 7mm mag.

    My Goals are to have a gun capable of a decent group at 1000 yards (target shooting not hunting).

    What upgrades can I do to my 7 mm mag? I would like to have a DBM, (any ideas on which is best) and would like to upgrade the stock to something that is more tacital like the McMillan A3-5, (with stock barrel?)

    Or should I just buy a .338 laupa? I thought that since I was a beginner I should upgrade the 7 mag first, I just don't want to put money into it if its money that could go into a new one.

    Thanks

    -AA
     
  2. liltank

    liltank Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the addiction! and LRH.:D 7mm Rem Mag will do all you need it to at this point. You'll want to get the trigger tuned up around 1.5 to 2#. With that said, the Remington stock trigger can be tuned, but if you want to go to something a little better, then a Jewel, or timney is the way to go. You can research this online and learn how to do the trigger tune on your own, or for anywhere between $20-$60 have it done by a gunsmith.

    You stock choice is excellent. Look around though, Manners is a top notch stock along with H-S. Most guys go with McMillian or Manners though. Either will do what you ask of it. One guy I know really pushes the Manners T-3 as the best long range stock for carry and target.

    After you tune the trigger and before you buy the stock, make sure the barrel is free floated. Don't know if you hand load or not (highly suggested for what we do here), take it to the range and make sure the barrel is up to scratch. You want to be able to shoot a minimum of .75" groups consistently at 100yds. You'll only need to shoot three or four different targets to know if it is a good barrel. If it is, then move on with your build.

    If it isn't, then check in to an after market barrel. Take it easy when you are target shooting. Shoot slow as not to over heat the barrel. Barrels get angry if you get them too hot. Clean every 50rnds or so. Make sure before your range session to have the barrel completely free of copper fouling.

    Get the best glass you can afford. This makes or breaks a rifle. Trigger time is key. Dry fire and see if you flinch. The cross hairs should not leave center other than a little bounce from the firing pin. If you find the the cross hairs jump any large amount, your flinching. Dry fire until you can calm it down. This should get you started.
     

  3. Asquared

    Asquared Member

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    Thanks for the advice. Is there any really good barrels that you/anyone would recommend that works well with the 700 BDL action. To answer your question about the reloading, no I don't, but is something else that I am starting to research.

    Thanks for the advice, and all tips are appreciated.

    -AA
     
  4. liltank

    liltank Well-Known Member

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    Everybody has their favorite. I have used Lothar Walther, Douglas, and benchmark. I like how quickly the benchmarks come in. My Lothar was very accurate. Had to sell that rifle unfortunately. Other guys on here like Krieger, brux, hart, pan nor and obermiyer. I know I'm forgetting others. It's all personal preference. Do some research and see what you want to spend.
     
  5. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to what will soon become an addiction.

    As for not making sense, hell some of us have been around a long time and have trouble making sense LOL.

    Basic upgrades CAN (but don't always) really improve the accuracy of a factory rifle.

    Level I.

    Free float the barrel, install steel/aluminum pillars and have a good bedding job done. Depending on the market in your area that can be done for around 200.00 or less.

    Figure out what your top end is in your budget for glass. Then save up 20% more and get the very best quality scope you can possibly afford.

    Start reloading or working with a custom loader to come up with a round that really works well in your rifle.

    Level II

    If it's not shooting 1 MOA or better have it pulled apart and trued.

    Upgrade your stock to a good McMillian, or other solid composite "custom" rifle stock. There are a half dozen or more really well respected stock makers in the US and any of them can make you a great stock. One of the newer on the scene is Texas Precision who came up with a great design that McMillian is making for them.

    Level III

    After a few years and lots of practice it'll be time to rebarrel. Go with a custom maker like Krieger, Brux, or other well respected maker and have one of our long range specialty guys who advertise and participate here do the work for you.

    When you do that, upgrade to the 7mm STW and join the rest of our clan LOL.

    If you get competent to 1,000yds you may want to build a big .30 or .338 so you can kill monsters from 1,000yds on with confidence.

    Once you get above the .30 cals though the guns get bigger, heavier, more expensive and so do the ammo/components and when you start stretching beyond 1,000yds with any of them you will need to go with real premium glass. Making that last step gets expensive.

    Have fun though and get yourself hooked.
     
  6. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Krieger, Brux, Bartlein, Hart, Schneider, Shilen and the list goes on.

    Any of the premium barrel makers can do you a great job. The secret comes from taking that premium barrel and getting it exactly right, truing up the action etc and that's where the importance of a great gunsmith with a good reputation for LR rifles is essential. We have lots of those guys who are members and advertisers here so when you are ready, finding one won't be tough if you hang around this site a while.
     
  7. dogdinger

    dogdinger Writers Guild

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    Asquared,
    You are very much on the right track. I started basically the way you did. I had a 7mag that shot pretty good so I started tuning it, and stretching out the range. My suggestion to you would be to work with what you have until you get a few hundred rounds under your belt . The 7mag is a true 1K shooter and there are many good bullets out there for it. I started by doing a pillar bedding job and free floating the barrel on the original stock. then tuned the trigger to a crisp 2 lbs. Lapped the bases and the rings to the best scope I could afford. Tuned my reloads. I still have the gun and it still shoots 1/4 MOA with the factory barrel. Get you a good rangefinder and do a lot of practicing. Best practice I found is plastic 1 gal milk jugs....... set them out at random yardages, learn to range, dope the wind and shoot.....my philosophy was , if I can hit a milk jug I am GTG for hunting at that range. Have fun
     
  8. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    Asquared- for hunting you will need a lazer range finder. if it just for targets at known distance no. also i would start reloading. especially for target shooting. the quickest way to 1000 yard gun is getting a remington sendero . By taking a 700 action ( $350), putting a heavy krieger barrel ( 300 +125) 26" to 28 " , and a stock of your choice ($200 to ?? ) is the best way . for targets Heavier is better. i consider a bdl a sporter weight, the sendero a mid weight , and my f-class 17 pound rifle heavy weight. i have a sporter weight, adl 7mm mag. it will shoot great groups at close range but they are not like the heavy custom barrels for long range. the sendero is a compromise. and they shoot great i have a couple with krieger barrels . awesome.
     
  9. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    we did not talk about the trigger or scope. you may want to keep your sporter for carrying/hunting and get a heavy target rifle or you may want to sell the bdl and get a sendero weight to do both. trying to get a sporter weight rifle to shoot like the sendero or heavy- would involve a lot of time, money and reloading components and recoil from a light rifle.
     
  10. cwinner

    cwinner Well-Known Member

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    Great advice so far, the only thing I would add is to look into a good bipod such as the Atlas and dont scrimp on reloading dies initially or you will wind up buying another set once your skills improve.....I would suggest redding type S dies at a Minimum and the competition bullet seater with micrometer....I use their full competition sets for my rifles, I have found that billet seating depth plays almost as much of a role in accurate ammunition as powder variety does.

    Great comment about the empty milk jugs, they make great reactive targets ( just pick them up when your done) and the only others thing I can recommend is to practice, practice, practice. You don't save any money reloading but you can sure shoot a lot more.


    Start saving now, your going to need it!!
     
  11. MontanaRifleman

    MontanaRifleman Well-Known Member

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    Sell the BDL and buy a Sendero. A used one that has been treated well with low round count and a proven good shooter would do fine. It's a great platform to learn LR on. While you are shooting and learning with this you can consider what your next rifle or upgrade will be.

    Once the barrel is burned out you can either sell it for it's action and stock which would be worth about $600 or so and get a full custom project going or you can true and upgrade the action and rebarrel with a custom match grade tube after you have had time to digest all the input here to make some good choices. Making choices about actions, stocks, barrels, etc, now might get you something other than what you might really want.

    I did the Sendero thing and learned a lot. I'm selling (sold) mine and having a couple of rifles built off of blue printed actions and as time goes on, hopefully a couple of full custom jobs.

    You are going to end up dumping a lot of $$$ into a BDL to make it a good reliable LR shooter. If you buy a good stock for a sporter factory barrel, you're putting a string of pearls on a pig for LR purposes. Just go ahead and sell the the BDL and get a Sendero or maybe a Savage and be done with it.
     
  12. Asquared

    Asquared Member

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    Ok well thanks for all the great information. information looks like I have some shooting to do. I'm studying the long range calculations etc and should get to do some shooting next week! Thanks for all the advice.
     
  13. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to LRH and enjoy!

    You've got a very nice list of barrel recommendations thus far ... I have had very good luck/results with Lilja barrels ...

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hf9zZqn00CA"]Lilja BoreScope Video - YouTube[/ame]

    Good luck and happy safe shooting/hunting.