New Barrel for .220 swift

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by YOTES2CALL, Jan 27, 2007.

  1. YOTES2CALL

    YOTES2CALL Well-Known Member

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    thinking of re-barrel for the swift...

    1 in 8 or 1 in 9 instead of the 1 in 14 it is now.

    want to go to heavier 75 or 80 grains to fight this Western Wind....

    thoughts and opinions please...
    Thanks!
     
  2. remingtonman_25_06

    remingtonman_25_06 Well-Known Member

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    Smart thinking..I would like to have another swift, but a slow twist to shoot the 75 amax or 80g vld. It turns them into at least 800 yard yote getters.
     

  3. CatShooter

    CatShooter Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    thinking of re-barrel for the swift...

    1 in 8 or 1 in 9 instead of the 1 in 14 it is now.

    want to go to heavier 75 or 80 grains to fight this Western Wind....

    thoughts and opinions please... Thanks!

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Good thinking. I have a 40XB with a 14" twist, .22-250. The barrel's still good, but I'm going to have it rebarreled because the 14" twist is toooo slow for the current crop of long range bullets.

    I'll get a 9" - it'll stabilize the 75 A-Max - I think the 80's and heavier need a 8" or faster.

    .
     
  4. YOTES2CALL

    YOTES2CALL Well-Known Member

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    I was looking at the 80 Vld. good BC and I know they handle the wind Excellent....

    any more pros or cons in doing this ??

    Thanks guys !
     
  5. YOTES2CALL

    YOTES2CALL Well-Known Member

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    TTT
     
  6. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Conventional wisdom will say get a 1-8 twist for the 80 gr VLD but at the velocity potential of the 220 swift I would be suprised if a 1-9 would not handle those bullets fine.

    I would lean more toward the 75 gr A-max if this will be used for hunting varmints or yotes because that bullet will expand MUCH better then any match HP bullet and be a much more effective game bullet.

    Whatever twist or bullet you choose to use, I would highly recommend going with a 6 groove or 5R or 5C barrel. DO not go with a 3 groove barrel. These are very hard on thin jacketed heavy for caliber bullets at high velocity. The 5 or 6 groove will allow you up to 300 fps more velocity without bullet failure.

    Kirby Allen(50)
     
  7. YOTES2CALL

    YOTES2CALL Well-Known Member

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    Kirby,

    what would you charge for such a barrel ? And I guess, is it worth the money in your opinion. Keep the swift for a 0 to 450 yard gun. And, would I be better off getting a 22 243 built or some such caliber ?

    it will go on a Model 70 heavy Varmint. the current barrel is 26" SS fluted. would like to keep same contour.

    thanks, Yotes
     
  8. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

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    It's well documented that properly designed heavier bullets are generally more accurate at longer distances. The more velocity one can achieve, the better because it is in the air for less time, the conditions have less influence because they don't have as much time to push things around.

    not rocket science.

    I think you should go with a 1-8 twist barrel personally. there is a great deal of test data floating around that supports this twist rate in 22 caliber centerfire cartridges. The USMC Reserve Service Rifle Team uses 1-8 in their gas guns because they have proven that it's effective on 80 grain VLD Bergers. Sierra's too.

    I'd like to offer a suggestion though. Select your barrel carefully. The 223 that an AR or M-16 uses is only going to get you around 2700 fps. Give or take. they work in a finite set of rules. The barrel has to be so long, etc. . .

    You don't have these limitations. It can work for you or against you.

    A 220 swift has a lot of steam. You can more than likely get to 3300 fps with this cartridge or perhaps a bit more before centrifical force takes over and starts pulling the thing apart.

    The way the lands and grooves are formed/cut/machined are what I would consider paying attention to.

    It's well documented that 5R or "polygonal" rifling is gentler on a bullet. There are no 90 corners on the features. Weakest part of a house? The corner. If you "cut" or form a 90 corner in a bullet whizzing at 300,000 RPM and if it fails, it is more than likely going to be along that crease formed by the lands/grooves.

    A polygonal configuration reduces this effect. The jacket material retains more of its structural integrity. It has a higher resistance to mid flight jacket failure. They are also supposedly more resistant to fouling because the crap cant hide in the corners as well. There are no corners!

    Boots Obermyer makes a damn fine barrel and is a sharp ol cat with a lot of years under his belt as a barrel maker and shooter. Just something to consider.

    Bottom line, the 1-8 twist with those bullet weights is well established. Something else might work, but we all know this will work.

    If you shoot VLD bullets, condsider having the reamer made for it. There is a difference. David Kiff at Pacific Tool and gauge is one stop shopping for great tooling. He's well versed on making a reamer for a specific application. Throat lengths and angles become fairly important with what you are wanting. He know's how to do this better than anyone in my opinion.

    Hope this helped.


    Chad Dixon
     
  9. uncleB

    uncleB Well-Known Member

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    NesikaChad,
    I think you are a bit confused you are claiming that a 5R is the same as a polygonal, this is way off base. A 5R (5groove russian) still has grooves and lands. a polygonal is a different thing entirely.
    UB
     
  10. 308 nate

    308 nate Well-Known Member

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    YOTES2CALL,
    I believe we talked by way of e-mail. If so,we were talking about the Broughton 5C and of the two you mention above they only offer that twist rate in a 1-8. I also feel the 1-8 would be the twist of choice for stabalizing the 75's &amp; 80's.
    FWIW,
    308nate
     
  11. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

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    My only point was they do not have the highly defined edges of a more "traditional" rifle bore.

    Can we agree the intended thought process is to avoid inclusions on the jacket material of the bullet and hopefully reduce the tendency to grenade bullets in mid flight?
     
  12. uncleB

    uncleB Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    My only point was they do not have the highly defined edges of a more "traditional" rifle bore.

    Can we agree the intended thought process is to avoid inclusions on the jacket material of the bullet and hopefully reduce the tendency to grenade bullets in mid flight?

    [/ QUOTE ]
    NesikaChad,
    I did not want to flame or pull a catshooter, just wanted to point out that a polygonal is quite different from a 5R or 5C type rifling, the most important in this topic is stay away from a 3 groove and you will be fine.
    UB