Mountain Coyote hunting

Discussion in 'Coyote Hunting - From 10 Yards to over 1,000 Yards' started by Iron Worker, Oct 20, 2008.

  1. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

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    I'm planing on hunting Coyotes in the high Sierra Mountains next week. No snow on the ground yet. Any suggestions for methods? I bet all my shots will be under a 100 yards. I'll be driving on a logging road at about 5,000 Ft elevation. Many small meadows and canyons along with thick rocky heavy forest terrain.
     
  2. NightforceKen

    NightforceKen <b>SPONSOR</b>

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    Iron,

    I am in no way shape or form a Pro when it comes to Yote hunting, but here is how i would set up.

    Look at the game trails where they intersect the logging roads.
    Find the one that has the most traffic and if you find dog tracks even better.

    Position yourself down the game trail away from the road. Be carefully not to leave to much sign while scouting this area and location, because we all know how fast a yote will pick up on human sign.

    If you have an electronic call set it in a tree around the game trail where you have a good line of sight. Then look at the avenues of approach, where would the dog come from and where would he most likely sit to check out the area.

    I typically use skunk oil to try and mask my sent, it has worked very well for me.

    If you have good eyes on the area ask your self, If i can see him can he see me? If the answer is maybe or no then set up and start the call.

    Your situation is nearly identical to the hunting conditions i routinely hunt in my area. This method has worked well for me as it seems Coyotes like to follow these game trails to find a weakling in the herd or pack.

    Let me know if it works for ya,

    Ken
     

  3. ol mike

    ol mike Well-Known Member

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    Howdoo Iron Worker,

    Hunting coyotes is just like hunting anything else.

    I've went calling w/ many people over the years and have to say overcalling is one of biggest calling mistake made -imo.
    Coyotes have heard calls for many years now and the smart coyotes are the ones that lived through being called.They know a dying rabbit sound might not be a dying rabbit.
    Limit calling to around 20 seconds and slowly pan the calling around as much as possible w/out moving your body much.If you use an electronic caller -do some calling w/a handcall towards other directions a few times.
    Call 20 seconds and wait 3 full minutes -watch the game trails as Ken mentioned.

    For a decoy i use squirrels tails [anything will do] tied to spiderwire fishing line -tied to a bush 40-60 ft away -inbetween calling twitch the squirrel tail w/ your finger behind your leg.Once the predator spots the decoy -no more calling unless you have a remote caller then very low volume.
    Also i've used one or two cardboard crow decoy cutouts -aimed towards the squirrel tail decoy ,crows/ravens seem to know everything that goes on in the outdoors -and will give a coyote confidence that everything is ok -plus the black bird silhouette can be seen from afar.Put a bread tie through the cardboard and wire it to a bush/limb 6-7' off the ground.

    Don't park close to the area -walk in at "least" a half mile -coyotes come from over a mile to a call -they see a vehicle -it's over.

    SET-UP -THE MOST IMPORTANT THING OF ALL - i have coyote hunting videos that feature "the pro's" the guys that say hunt w/your face in the wind -bull-oney.
    Unless you have somehow found a place where coyotes are ignorant to calling sitting w/ your face into the wind doesn't work most of the time.
    IMO-The vast majority of coyotes that have been called before will come in from downwind generally staying in cover to see what is -really- going on.
    The way to combat that is to set up so that your scent is blowing into the wide open -that way the only way for a coyote to get downwind and scent you is to come out in the wide open -just what a rifleman wants !
    I've had them run right by me within 6' -when i heard them coming i just brought the gun up slowly and waited for them to get in front of the barrel.

    Don't sit in the sun ! Sit w/ your back to the sun -in the shade.

    Camo everything -no glints.

    Don't enter an area w/ your scent blowing into heavy cover b/c the predators will likely be using that cover as their bedroom.

    All this sounds like you need all the planets to line up just right that's why so many questions are asked on coyote calling/hunting.

    Here's how i'd approach the terrain you mention -glass the area to see which way the wind is blowing then approach so that your scent isn't going into the heavy cover -then try to find a spot w/ good views/shooting lanes.

    Don't wear boots that you wear to the gas station.

    Be ready -have the rifle on the shooting sticks <-use shooting sticks for sure they will easily double your shooting range.

    Keep an eye out after a set - i have killed many coyotes that took off when i went to retrieve the caller.

    Don't let the coyotes get too close -shoot them before they get within 150yds if possible ,make movements w/ the gun only when the coyote is moving -if he stops and is looking don't move a muscle.
    You should have the young of the year willing to offer a shot -try some pup distress it will bring in other pups/alpha's and beta's alike.
    Good luck -Mike
     
  4. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

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    Thanks to the both of you hunters. What a gold mine of information.
     
  5. ol mike

    ol mike Well-Known Member

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    Did you get to go ?
     
  6. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

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    Oh dang there are people every where. I did go but here in Ca we've had a long term drought. Plus the area I went to in Sierra mountains had a bunch of off roaders . I drove deep into NV desert people who lived out there said they haven't seen many coyotes or jacks because of the drought mentioning if there's no food for them there's no new births.So rather then spend night after night in motels I came home early. I feel discouraged. But thanks for responding to my post with the helpful information.
     
  7. ol mike

    ol mike Well-Known Member

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    Well that stinks -better luck.