Mk4 zero stop, on the cheap... :o

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by green 788, May 5, 2012.

  1. green 788

    green 788 Well-Known Member

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    I thought of this some time back and never really shared it with anyone online...

    I wanted a way to stop my elevation turret from turning one rev too low, below my 100 yard zero. I think I've lost count of the times I've gotten mixed up as to which rev I'm on, wondering if I'm really back to my 100 yard zero or not.

    You can count the hash marks, that's true... but I've found that with several scopes, it's pretty much impossible for me to remember which hash mark my 100 yard zero is on.

    And counting the revs from bottom out? That works better in theory than in practice, again, for the same reason counting the hash marks doesn't work so well... I can't remember all that info for various scope I have... I get it all mixed up.

    So... I have found that with my Nightforce NXS, I just made a polymer washer of the correct size to drop around the elevation turret and I sanded it to the exact thickness to stop the turret right at my 100 yard zero. Works great on the NXS...

    For the Mk4, however, the turret cap goes down inside the outer housing, and I had to come up with something else.

    I had the idea to put a rubber "O" ring inside that turret... I think this one is a #14 (?)... not sure. You can pick up an assortment at Lowes or Home Depot, and use what works.

    [​IMG]

    Anyway, this O ring fits nice and snug around the inner part of the turret, and sits in the bottom of the channel that the turret cap runs up and down in... and it puts the brakes on going one rev too low--if you choose the right size O ring... that part is important. Granted, it's more of a slow binding feel than a dead stop... but it serves its purpose, to keep you from going a full rev below 100 yard zero.

    You can pick it out with a dental pick or just a safety pin with a tiny hook bent on the end of it.

    This can't possibly void any sort of warranty on the scope, but I wouldn't leave it in there if I ever sent it back to Leupold... they might get confused, or worse yet fabricate some horse pellets to the effect that you damaged the turret, which of course it wouldn't.

    The "O" ring is not a precise zero stop... all it does is keep you from going one rev too low... I actually got lucky with my last mount and found an O ring that literally stopped the turret at the zero mark... but if it goes a few MOA under that, you at least know where you are on the turret.

    This may or may not work with other scope designs... you'll just have to experiment. Hard polymer or aluminum washers can be used in some instances, but you of course have to go to the trouble of making them or having them made...

    Dan
     
  2. ZSteinle

    ZSteinle Well-Known Member

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    Great Idea! Never thought of O-rings but was going to make some washers and this seems much easier. P.S. you need more scope rings!
     

  3. boomer55

    boomer55 Active Member

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    Great Idea! I'll try that on my Leupolds.
     
  4. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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  5. sp6x6

    sp6x6 Well-Known Member

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    Vortex sells thier scope with a shim kit.I think there are others,they have been used for years with no problem. I would say moral of the story is dont turn them as if arm wrestling some one. I put a brass washer in my mark 4 and use a small allen as a fine tuner,no problems and I would do it again.
     

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  6. green 788

    green 788 Well-Known Member

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    Nightforce just made up that story because they know that their 175 dollar zero stop kits will stop selling...

    I've used the polymer washers that I've made on my NXS with no issues at all. There isn't really any mechanically conceivable reason that this would harm a thing, unless you cranked the turret down hard against the shim and kept on turning...

    The rubber "O" rings buffer the stop, for any concerned.

    But Nightforce's claim that the zero stop washers messed up the turrets is pretty laughable, really... :eek:

    Dan
     
  7. green 788

    green 788 Well-Known Member

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    I know... :) Those are the Weaver TacticaL rings, aluminum except for steel cross bolt and nut. Two of them weigh about what a steel Badger or Nightforce ring would weigh... so I just put 'em all four on there (originally was going to use just 3 ring, but 4 fit)...

    Anyway... if one of the cross bolt nuts backs off no big deal... the scope won't lose zero. :D

    Dan
     
  8. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    I understand your logic Dan. I have never tried it so I have no personal experience. The reason I pointed it out is that I remember back then when DUH was having a real problem and he stated this was the cause. Then if I remember correctly a few other guys on here were having issues with their NXS's not returning to a dead on zero and they read this and removed the washers and all was good. Not trying to rain on your parade, just thought I would toss it out there in case anyone has a zero hold issue. I know over the years I have read many of DUH's posts and he is a very renowned long range hunter. So even if I didnt want to take NF's word for it I do trust what DUH and the other posted.

    I know other scopes like the PST use this method, but I figuered there could be a difference in mechanical make up.

    All I know is if your scope does not return to a perfect zero, your dial ups will be off too.

    Carry on, and do what ever works for you.

    Jeff
     
  9. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    I run the same rings and like them for the price but your in serious over kill land and you can damage a scope if you set rings that close to your turrets if your not real light with the torque wrench, just a friendly heads up!!
     
  10. green 788

    green 788 Well-Known Member

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    I don't over-tighten the rings, but that's a good point to make. I've seen folks dent scope tubes by going overboard with the wrench.

    The original plan was to use 3 of these 4 Weaver rings, but since they all fit, I just put 'em all on there. :eek: Four ring systems are commonly used on heavy recoiling handgun scopes... and while I realize the 110BA with its 20 pound dead weight and muzzle brake is not a heavy recoiler, my main reason for using extra rings is that with a two ring system, all that has to happen to ruin your zero is for one of those two rings to loosen. Perhaps not likely, but it's possible... I'm sure many of us have had that happen...

    I use liquid electrical tape, and bed the lower ring halves. It makes a very thin, rubbery layer that sticks the scope in place, and of course stands up to a lot of heat so it won't move... then just torque to whatever the ring manufacturer recommends... around 15 to 20 inch pounds or somewhere in that area.

    On the Nightforce turrets... I would never disparage someone else's personal testimony and experience. Strange things happen in this world. I guess I would just want Nightforce to "tell it to me like I'm a six year old" why this can harm their turrets. If they can make it make sense, I'll consider it. If not, I'll likely continue to believe that they're just trying to justify charging us 200 dollars (up from 175) for a zero stop... :eek:

    Scope manufacturers are pretty much like any other manufacturer out there... if they can find some reason to throw blame for a fault onto the user, and away from their product, they'll do it. Harley Davidson used to try to void warranty work if they found out you were using some other 20W50 motor oil (other than theirs)... so my guess is that Nightforce did find a problem with their scope, and fixed that... blamed it on the zero washers... and they probably sold the guy a 200 dollar zero stop in the bargain.

    Dan