Mil-Dots for ranging?

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by MSU Marksman, Aug 15, 2007.

  1. Yes, I use them to accurately calculate ranges.

    21.1%
  2. No, I use a laser range finder for that.

    78.9%
  1. MSU Marksman

    MSU Marksman Well-Known Member

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    I see that the majority of companies that make long range optics offer mil-dots on most of their models. I was wondering how many people here who own long range mil-dot optics, actually use them for range finding? Or do you still bring a laser range finder, and just figure the clicks accordingly?
     
  2. 300rum

    300rum Well-Known Member

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    Hi MSU Marksman,

    I use MilDot for ranging up to 800yrds on big games. I love to use MilDot for ranging, especially when your Rangefinder is out of battery or is TO COLD to operate.
    Usually I'm out with 20-30yards at 800yards, because the size of animals can vary from one to another.
    When you are using this techniques you have to see how old is your target (young or old game), because the size is always different, and after that you have to apply the MilDot technique for ranging.
    YOU NEED LOTS OF PRACTICE, PRACTICE AND PRACTICE...
    I USED MILDOT FOR RANGING IN CONJUNCTION WITH MILDOT-MASTER
     

  3. Hunter

    Hunter Well-Known Member

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    This is the kind of wording of a question that is terrible on a written exam. Yes, I use a MilDot for ranging while hunting and Yes, I use a laser Rangefinder for that. ;)
     
  4. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    mill dots

    I use the mill dots for shooting known distance out to
    700 or 800yrds .

    I use a range finder to verify the distance and beyond
    7 or 800 yrds use the scope turret's to adjust zero's.

    In the areas I hunt you may only have time to range
    and shoot,but in wide open areas I would allways
    prefer to adjust the scope.

    If the game is running and over 300 yrds away then its a
    moot point.( no shot ).

    Using a mill dot reticle to range is marginal at best in my
    opinion.

    After zeroing the scope I verify the zero of each mill dots
    yardage .

    J E CUSTOM
     
  5. sscoyote

    sscoyote Well-Known Member

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    Here's a link to a good discussion on reticle-rangefinding--

    http://www.longrangehunting.com/forums/f18/moa-reticles-23482/

    If you're gonna use the mil-dot for ranging i'd suggest using it at the scope's highest power whether it's mil-calibrated there or not. Check the optics catalogs for the reticle subtensions at the highest power, and then adapt the mil-ranging formula for it. Reticle ranging is more accurate at the scope's highest power (and consequently finer reticle subtension) most of the time.
     
  6. Rimfire

    Rimfire Well-Known Member

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    I believe as JE Custom said "Using a Mill Dot reticle is marginal at best in my opinion"

    I look at it this way, I spend a lot of time and money on custom rifles and load development. All of my long range rigs shoot 1/2 MOA on a bad day and 1/3 MOA or better on a good day. All shoot sub MOA at 1K. In ideal conditions.

    So why use Mills to range and as 300 rum said be off 20-30 yards at 800 yards? That is unexceptable in my book! In the non magnums I am shooting and even 300WSM that would ADD 1 MOA of error to the shot. And that IS NOT center to center that is a full 8" high or 8" low error at 800 depending if judged long or short. I just don't want to be off by that much from the start.

    For sniper matches have at it. It should be great fun. Or for what they were intended a 8" or 20" low shot is still a good hit on an enemy.

    I'll stick with my LRF.

    Funny thing is, I've had the chance to hunt with many LR hunters. Some from this board that even say they use Mills. I have yet to see a shot taken without a LRF.

    just my .02
     
  7. Rimfire

    Rimfire Well-Known Member

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    I believe as JE Custom said "Using a Mill Dot reticle is marginal at best in my opinion"

    I look at it this way, I spend a lot of time and money on custom rifles and load development. All of my long range rigs shoot 1/2 MOA on a bad day and 1/3 MOA or better on a good day. All shoot sub MOA at 1K. In ideal conditions.

    So why use Mills to range and as 300 rum said be off 20-30 yards at 800 yards? That is unexceptable in my book! In the non magnums I am shooting and even 300WSM that would ADD 1 MOA of error to the shot. And that IS NOT center to center that is a full 8" high or 8" low error at 800 depending if judged long or short. I just don't want to be off by that much from the start. that would instantly turn my true 1/2 MOA rifle into a 1-1/2 MOA.

    For sniper matches have at it. It should be great fun. Or for what they were intended a 8" or 20" low shot is still a good hit on an enemy.

    I'll stick with my LRF.

    Funny thing is, I've had the chance to hunt with many long range hunters. Some from this board that even say they use Mills. I have yet to see a shot taken without a LRF.

    just my .02
     
  8. Inukshuk

    Inukshuk Well-Known Member

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    I use mildots exclusively for ranging and using holdovers. Right now I can holdover up to 700 yrds comfortably. And for though's who say marginally at best well, have you tried it. To get good at it you have to practice. Now that I'm used to it I'm not even interested in LRF. With mildot ranging and holdovers I find it pretty fast.
    Tools to help in trainning
    Mildot Master
    ShooterReady
    And if your not in a rush another cool tool:
    https://www.511tactical.com/index.asp?dlrID=511&dept=53
    IOR - Valdada Premium European Optics
     
  9. Charles A

    Charles A Well-Known Member

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    Milling a live object over a couple hundred yards in the "real" world is at best less then optimal, and at worst downright useless.
     
  10. Inukshuk

    Inukshuk Well-Known Member

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    I would agree at that distance for any kind of ranging. Like for me I'm zeroed at 200 yrds and at 100yrds and 300 yrds I'm only -1 to +1 mil which isn't a lot and the prey is a goner.
     
  11. Michael Eichele

    Michael Eichele Well-Known Member

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    I use a LRF but practice ranging with Mildots. I typically run a 25 yard error at 750 yards. For a flatter shooting cartridge 25 yards at 750 is minimal on a deer or goat size critter. I practice using mils because you never know when an electronic device will fail. It still may limit your range but will at least keep you in the game. With even a little practice, using mils is very effective.
     
  12. Inukshuk

    Inukshuk Well-Known Member

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    Using the MP8 reticle from IOR with it's .5 mils helps in accuracy a lot compared to standard mil-dots.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Very precise with practice, and no batterries
     
  13. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    Those numbers don't look right to me in the MP8 chart above.
    Help me out:

    21600 MINs/circle
    6283.2 MILs/circle
    21600/6283.2= 3.438 MOAs/MIL
    An MOA=1.047"/100yds, so 3.438*1.047= 3.6"/MIL/100yds

    1MIL= 3.438 MOA
    1MIL= 3.6 inches @ 100yds

    1/4MIL= (3.6/4)/100= .009"/Yd, or 3.438/4= .86 MOA

    How do you get .837 MOA?
    Maybe if MOAs were 0.9/0.837, or 1.075"..
    How do you get .9"/yd?
    That would be 90" at 100yds!

    My precision must be off or something.
     
  14. Inukshuk

    Inukshuk Well-Known Member

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