MARKSMANSHIP BASICS - Firearm Support

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by Ian M, Sep 3, 2007.

  1. Ian M

    Ian M Well-Known Member

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    #1 What front and rear rests do you employ for long range hunting?

    #2 Do you always support the rifle at the front and rear when setting-up for a shot in the field?
     
  2. Rogue

    Rogue Well-Known Member

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    Firearm Support

    I use a bipod for the front rest.

    I like to pack light in the field, so no rear bag. I have a fleece vest that works well when rolled up tight.

    Not always. But for any shot past two hundred yards a front rest is a must have. The firing position dictates if a rear rest is employed. Any prone shot will be supported by a rear rest.

    Randy
     

  3. ss7mm

    ss7mm Writers Guild

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    All of my field guns have bipods on them and I prefer to use them when possible. That doesn't meant it gets used every time. Sometimes you just can't use the bipod but a rolled up coat, daypack etc. works better


    I always support both ends in some manner. I carry a small bean bag that clips on my belt and weighs practically nothing that usually gets used. Sometimes I use my hand to support the rear and I have used my hand and the bean bag together. If I can't support it I wont' take a shot that I can't hold absolutely steady. I have made shots using a bipod from the sitting position and this works pretty good but not at extreme ranges.
     
  4. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    I use a bipod or a poly bag on the front and a poly bag on the rear. I test my guns to see if they shoot the same both ways and if they don't like one type of front rest then I don't use it.
    Yes.
     
  5. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    #1 What front and rear rests do you employ for long range hunting?

    Bipod for the front and beanie bag for the rear.

    #2 Do you always support the rifle at the front and rear when setting-up for a shot in the field?

    Always!
     
  6. 41mag

    41mag Well-Known Member

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    #1 What front and rear rests do you employ for long range hunting?
    I use a variety of bi-pods type rest, from the Harris to a couple of different height Stoney Points, to a home made one. I hunt varied terrain and the cover dictates which will be used. If the area is open and grass is low I prefer the Harris, if the grass is tall, if I am still huinting or might be stalking I prefer the Stoney Point Detachable or the home made one.

    #2 Do you always support the rifle at the front and rear when setting-up for a shot in the field?
    Whenever possible, but I am comfortable out to 200yds standing and offhand with a couple of rifles. I do however prefer to have any sort of rest over not having one.
     
  7. Sidesy

    Sidesy Active Member

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    hi, i have made a wooden support so i dont over-reach when shooting from the drivers seat (rhs dont forget) through passenger window. I then have my right elbow on steering wheel and my left elbow on center console (raised in height with a window bag)

    works well

    i have been having an issue with trying to find "that" position from the driving seat after being a passenger for sooooo long [​IMG]

    To that end , after a little chat with my neighbour i came up with a solution that i hope may in turn may offer an answer for you aswell?

    My main problem was finding something that would be "easy" to take in and out of the vehicle and wouldnt damage the inside or require the normal self tappers / gaffer tape[​IMG] .....then, to link it someway to the cars existing fittings / interior to provide a rock-solid platform.

    I used 3" x 2" wood as it was stood in the garage but i'm sure there will be a whole medium of other stuff you may have that will do the job as well or , better[​IMG]

    The whole project hinges around using the bars of the headrest to provide a substantial fix.

    http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m...flerest003.jpg

    http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m...flerest004.jpg

    http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m...flerest002.jpg

    The finished article after a little spray (krylon / fern pattern - yes , i wont give duracoat a run for their money i know!) and i have added some anti slip covering to the wood where the foreend sits (the type you have on your dash to stop things sliding about). I have added two pieces of wood at different heights too so i have an option for adjustment of distance shots. There is some cushioning to sit on the dash (see pic). So, in essence, its fixed via the headest and straddles across to sit on the dash. This allows you to rest your rifle/s butt on car floor and mod against seat.

    http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m...flerest001.jpg

    Rocket science it aint BUT, its works and just needs a little "tinkering" and practice but it does give you a rock steady platform....

    If you have a headrest in your vehicle then this may be the answer.......[​IMG]

    Hope this helps someone[​IMG]

    Gary
     
  8. Rhino Hunter

    Rhino Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Maybe I'm missing something...but I gotta ask.

    What would you be shooting at from inside of your automobile?

    RH
     
  9. Sidesy

    Sidesy Active Member

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    foxes , rabbits , squirrels.......offers a rock steady aiming platform

    Gary
     
  10. Rhino Hunter

    Rhino Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I see. It is a nice looking set-up that should offer solid support.

    Here in Michigan the DNR is a little bit funny about shooting from an automobile.

    Thanx for the response.

    Take care,

    RH

     
  11. bigbrother

    bigbrother Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the type of hunting I'm doing. Fixed position long range in NW PA, we are typically shooting from a bench with a typical front rest and rear bag. OR from a tripod type shooting system that we can shoot standing up. This system supports the front and rear of the rifle in sort of a cradle.

    For my carry rifle it's either a Harris bipod on the front with rear bag or sticks with whatever....

    But YES, if it's over 200 yards, I'm supporting both ends of the rifle in some manner.
     
  12. eyeballjr

    eyeballjr Well-Known Member

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    LOL you would be a hero for some of the road hunters here in NE OK with a set up like that. I can't imagine the noise inside the cab of the vehicle
     
  13. drbill

    drbill Well-Known Member

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    Thats awesome and redneck in same sentence. I use a Harris swivel for prone to sitting position. I also carry Stoney point stix with tripod and extra short deal/leg off tripod. Works really well. Killed nice elk at over 600 yards at 35 degree angle uphill this year in Wyoming. The extra leg of tripod swivels and supports the back. Oh by the way I have used the mirror out the window but not on large game. lol :) I also use the stix as walking stick but pain when need to glass but i use them to rest my binos on them as well just like Jim Shockey.:)
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2011
  14. Guy M

    Guy M Well-Known Member

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    Wow - this thread has been going since '07!

    No - I seldom support the buttstock with anything but my shoulder. Up front I might use a bipod or shooting sticks. More likely to just rest it on my pack, or a rolled up jacket, or believe it or not, just use the shooting sling wrapped snug around my arm. All have worked for me.

    Depends on the time & natural rests available. Made a 400 yard shot in Wyoming, using a very handy tree limb, while standing. Worked great. My pard actually snapped a photo of me using the rest. I had just dropped the deer, and was waiting, ready to place another shot if necessary. It wasn't. The deer is just above that line of bright, bright morning sunshine and can't be seen:
    [​IMG]

    For ultimate accuracy, of course nothing beats a good solid rest. I just don't usually find a benchrest in the field. Odd...

    Regards, Guy