Loads safe to shoot?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by arrow, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. arrow

    arrow Well-Known Member

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    Loaded up some 300 win mags in virgin Norma brass. I uniformed the primer pockets then just loaded them up like normal. After inspecting the loaded rounds I noticed quite a few of them had the primers sticking up above the head of the casing. The were seated with an rcbs hand seater. Long story short I found out my lee uniformer has apparently been worn down so much and so dull it wasn't removing the required material from the primer pockets. (I now have a redding uniformer on order) my question is, is there any reason why I can't or shouldn't shoot these? I am not worried about precision on these loads and I can uniform them again once fired. Obviously close the bolt on them slowly. Would these effect headspace on the fireformed brass, meaning are the shoulders going to be pushed back farther than they should because the head is not flush against the bolt face?

    Thanks
     
  2. jasent

    jasent Well-Known Member

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    I would THINK they would be safe to shoot. A pic would help. How far out are they protruding? My GUESS would be that they would squish the primer flat but I'm not certain if they will affect head space...im thinking your fire forming them. I'd shoot one and compare it to well fire formed brass before shooting them all. Jmo
     

  3. Lefty7mmstw

    Lefty7mmstw Well-Known Member

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    If they aren't used in an auto with a floating firing pin they will be fine if they chamber, but may have slightly different lock time from shot to shot; so accuracy may be reduced somewhat. We've seen this with 44 mags at one time or another when you forget to clean the pockets. The big thing with them is if the dang things stick up enough they'll bind on rotation.

    As to the headspace changing afterward, I doubt it, as the pressure exerted by firing is a hell of a lot higher than the primer's cup strength(it flattens when you fire it, right?). It may change your effective headspace before it is shot, but if it chambers and you are alright with a bit of accuracy loss, so be it...
     
  4. arrow

    arrow Well-Known Member

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    Any chance it could damage the brass or primer pocket? If the pocket is not deep enough and the primer is already seated to the bottom, could it push the pocket inwards?
     
  5. varmintH8R

    varmintH8R Well-Known Member

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    I have no science to base this on, just my opinion. If I even have to ask (thread title), the answer is no. Primers are cheap, the biggest cost in taking these rounds apart is your time. Certainly not worth an "oh s**t" event, or even ruining some good brass.

    My 2C
     
  6. Lefty7mmstw

    Lefty7mmstw Well-Known Member

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    I'm beginning to think this guy is right..........


    How bad are they if you have to ask more ???? about the damage; I'd assumed a couple of thou. over flush.
    The casing is a lot thicker than the primer cup and most of the dimension change would be the primer squaring to the boltface.
    If more than a couple of thou. over flush, pull the bullets, dump the powder, and seat them harder to pull them down. Neck or fl size, and re-load.
     
  7. JeffP40

    JeffP40 Well-Known Member

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    Won't hurt a thing, just shoot them. I am wondering why new brass has pockets that are too shallow? They should not be that way. I have never had pockets too shallow. Not saying it can't happen tho.
     
  8. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    Especially Norma brass. Something don't add up.
     
  9. arrow

    arrow Well-Known Member

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    Well I got my redding uniformer and did the rest of the Norma brass. I was amazed at how much material had to be removed. And yes I'm keeping the cutter straight. I don't have a depth mic to measure but I went back to look at the problem cases and it was only a couple out of 60 that weren't cut deep enough. You can barely feel a bump when you run your finger over it. From a side view they can barely be seen. So should be good to fire and then just recut all those primer pockets? Also how long does it normally take to cut a primer pocket uniform with a drill at low power? I have always used cheaper brass and it went pretty quick. This is my first time with premium brass and it takes about a full minute for the cutter to bottom out with medium pressure. How much pressure should be used?
     
  10. JeffP40

    JeffP40 Well-Known Member

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    If you have a decent set of calipers you can use the rear as a depth gauge. The slide will protrude when opened. I would have checked this when I first encountered the amount of material that had to be removed. Even mediocre brass should not have to have much removed. the procedure is to uniform them, not make the final cut. That should have been done already.
    Anyway, they are good to go.